Sabtu, 27 Juli 2013

1980 Carburetor Troubleshooting

The vast majority of automobiles manufactured for the 1980 production-year were equipped with a carburetor, since fuel injection did not become a common feature until the later-half of the decade. Although the carburetor had been in use long before 1980, its basic design remained unchanged due to the component's relatively simple design. Troubleshooting a 1980 carburetor is a fairly straightforward process, but doing so should not be attempted without a familiarity with carburetors.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the carburetor from the engine with a wrench without draining the fuel from the carburetor bowl.

    2

    Examine the contents of the fuel in the carburetor bowl for contaminants, such as water, dirt and other foreign matter. Pass a magnet throughout the fuel bowl to capture any iron oxide dust that might cause a leak and the intake needle and seat.

    3

    Inspect the gasket surfaces on the body of the carburetor and on the underside of the air horn for burs or nicks. Smooth the damaged area with a file. Note that some carburetors produced in 1980 were equipped with a vacuum piston passageway. If a leak is present around the passageway due to an uneven gasket surface, the engine may hesitate when cornering.

    4

    Ensure that the carburetor flange nuts are tight with a wrench. If the flange is loose, air can enter the intake manifold from beneath the throttle plate and adversely affect idle quality and engine performance.

    5

    Fill the carburetor with clean fuel before installing it on the engine to prevent any dirt trapped in the fuel system from becoming dislodged by a sudden rush of fuel.

    6

    Run the engine at a low idle after allowing it to warm. Remove the choke heat pipe and block its opening with a finger. If little or no vacuum is detected, inspect the choke housing for leaks or a plugged vacuum passage. If vacuum is present, inspect the vacuum passages in the carburetor between the choke housing and the intake manifold for clogs.

    7

    Depress the throttle pedal to the floor and ensure that the throttle plates are wide open. Adjust the linkage if they are not, because high speed performance will be adversely affected.

    8

    Trace the carburetor's fuel line from the carburetor to the fuel pump while inspecting the line for sharp bends. Such a restriction can lead to vapor lock. Shorten or replace the line if you discover a bend.

Jumat, 26 Juli 2013

A 1999 Mercury Cougar Won't Crank

A 1999 Mercury Cougar Won't Crank

The Cougar is a sedan that was manufactured from the 1967-2002 model years by the Ford Motor Company under the Mercury brand. The 1999 Cougar is equipped with either a four speed automatic or five speed manual transmission. Depending on the package, the Cougar can either have a 2.0 L Zetec I4 or a 2.5 L Duratec V6 engine. Both engines may have problems cranking due to battery/alternator failure or ignition system issues.

Instructions

    1

    Try to jump start the Cougar's battery using jumper cables and another vehicle with a battery of comparable voltage.

    2

    Run the engine at an idle for several minutes if the jump is successful.

    3

    Turn off the Cougar's engine and disconnect the jumper cables.

    4

    Try starting the Cougar again. If it doesn't start at this point, the battery isn't holding a charge or the alternator isn't charging the battery. Auto parts retailers such as Auto Zone and Advance Auto Parts provide free testing services to determine which of these components is malfunctioning.

    5

    Consult a qualified automotive professional if the Cougar doesn't jump start. All components of the ignition system, including the starter and ignition switch, will need to be thoroughly inspected.

Kamis, 25 Juli 2013

How to Troubleshoot a 1998 Cadillac DeVille

Over time, your 1998 Cadillac Deville will encounter issues that will require you to spend time troubleshooting before you know what is causing them. By using the Deville's onboard diagnostic system, known as OBDII, you can find out what specific electrical or mechanical components are failing. Use an OBDII error code scanning tool to scan the diagnostic system for unique error codes that are sent out when components begin to stop working. When you know what specific parts are broken, you can begin the repair process sooner.

Instructions

    1

    Find the location of the OBDII port by feeling around the area below your Deville's steering wheel. The port will be placed in the area above where your right knee would sit if you were sitting in the driver's seat. It is rectangular in shape and will be about two inches wide by three quarters of an inch in height.

    2

    Plug the OBDII code scanning tool into the OBDII port and power the scanning tool on.

    3

    Insert the key to your Deville into the ignition and turn the ignition so that either the engine is idling, or if the engine will not start, to the position before the engine starts. Either will activate the car's electronic system and prompt the code scanning tool to begin its error code scan.

    4

    Take note of the error codes that appear on the display of the code scanning tool as the code scan is performed.

    5

    Determine what the error codes signify by bringing the list to a local dealership, repair shop, or auto parts store, all of whom will have reference materials that can tell you what each error code represents. You can also perform a web search using a search engine to determine what parts are failing by looking up each error code.

Rabu, 24 Juli 2013

What Would Cause an Antifreeze Leak in a 2005 Mustang With a V6 Engine?

While the fine SN-95 platform was hardly a living death for Ford's seminal pony car, the 2005 model year marked a serious rebirth for everything that made a Mustang a Mustang. While enthusiasts might view the car's history through rose-tinted V-8 lenses, Ford knew going in that most of its pony cars left the factory with six cylinders or less. While the Mustang's 210-horsepower, overhead-cam Cologne V-6 produced more power than many of its V-8 predecessors, it's also proven no less susceptible to coolant leaks and other minor failures.

Cooling System Basics

    The 4.0-liter Mustang's cooling system is much like any other designed in that it has a water pump, a thermostat to control fluid flow out of the engine block, hoses to carry the coolant to the heat exchangers, and heat exchangers to remove heat from the coolant and transfer it to the air. The Mustang typically has two heat exchangers: the primary cooling radiator and the heater core inside the HVAC system. The cooling system itself operates under continuous pressure, generally around 15 pounds per square inch at operating temperature.

Typical Failure Points

    Anywhere coolant system components meet is a potential failure point where leaks are concerned, but you're most likely to encounter them where system pressures are the highest. The thermostat housing probably is the single highest-pressure part of the cooling system -- aside from inside the engine block -- since that's where the hot coolant meets its greatest point of restriction. Apart from that, your most likely source of leaking is at the water pump. In this application, about half of the water pump case itself is incorporated into the timing cover; the "case" splits in half in the middle where the pump itself bolts on. This is a prime location for leaks.

The Thermostat Housing

    While the thermostat housing is, by nature of being a point of restriction, more susceptible to leaks than many other parts of the system, the 4.0-liter's thermostat housing is a particular example of what not to do to prevent leaks. This engine uses a two-part thermostat housing; the bottom half of the housing sits on the engine and holds the thermostat, and the top half serves as an attachment point for the radiator hose. The Mustang also uses an external bypass hose to return coolant from the housing to the pump. Between its two-piece design and external bypass, the thermostat housing offers plenty of opportunity for leaks.

Additional Sources

    The Mustang's cooling system gets rid of excess pressure through the coolant overflow tank; high pressures resulting from overheating easily can cause the overflow tank to dribble or spew coolant into the engine bay. Obviously, a damaged radiator, heater core or hoses cause a persistent coolant leak, as does leaking O-rings around the temperature sensor and coolant crossover tube. Very few coolant leaks on the V-6 are particularly life-threatening to the engine, but one at least could indicate something very serious. Fluid leaking from the head gasket, either outside the engine or into it, indicate a head gasket in need of immediate replacement -- a problem with earlier generations of the Cologne V-6.

How to Read Crank Bearing Numbers

Crank bearings come in several sizes to fit standard cranks and cranks that have been turned. The crankshaft journal may become scored over time. Instead of purchasing a new crankshaft, you can have it turned. When you have the crank turned, it removes a few thousandths of an inch of the material, which would make a standard bearing loose. If the bearings are too loose, the engine will not have enough oil pressure, which, in turn, decreases the life of the engine.

Instructions

    1

    Clean the oil off the bearing with the shop rag.

    2

    Locate the number near the end of the bearing. The notation will either be STD or have an number that looks like this: 0.30. If you have the letters STD instead of numbers, the crank has not been turned and it is using standard bearings. If the notation is a number, the crank has been turned. .030 means the crank has been turned 30 thousandths of an inch. .060 means the crank has been turned 60 thousandths of an inch.

    3

    Write down the number. You will need the number for the machine shop. The shop will turn the crank as much as needed, but depending on how much the crank has already been turned, it may not be able to turn it anymore. If you are simply replacing the bearings and not turning the crank, you will need the number to order new bearings.

My 1996 Ford Windstar Cranks Over But Won't Start

My 1996 Ford Windstar Cranks Over But Won't Start

Things can go wrong on older vehicles in just seconds, and a 1996 Ford Windstar fits that category. It may be perplexing to try to figure the problem out. Yet the fact that the vehicle cranks but won't run may not be as serious a repair as it may seem. A little vehicle detective work will get the Windstar back on the road in no time, even if you're not a professional mechanic. If nothing you try solves the problem, you should then call in a professional.

Instructions

    1

    Make sure there is gas in the tank. The gas gauge could be faulty and is not giving a true reading about the amount of gas in the vehicle.

    2

    Clean the battery post cables and tighten them if they seem loose. Battery cleaning tools are available at all auto parts stores.

    3

    Check the fuel filter for clogs that are preventing the fuel from getting to the fuel injectors. Listen for a humming sound when you turn on the ignition. This will indicate whether or not the fuel pump is working.

    4

    Examine the fuses and relays in the fuse box for a blown fuse. A bad fuse will cause an engine malfunction.

Bad Valve Seals Symptoms

Bad Valve Seals Symptoms

Valves regulate the amount of fuel and air mixture allowed in the cylinders for combustion. While the valves have guides or sleeves to keep combustion gases from passing through them, the seals on the top of the valves keep oil in the valve cover from being sucked down into the engine. Seals, typically made of high-strength rubber, fit over the top of the valve stem inside a small collar. When valve seals begin to wear or fail they produce some obvious and unique symptoms.

Cold Engine

    One of the most noticeable signs of worn or cracked valve stem seals will be just after a cold engine start. If the vehicle has been sitting for any length of time or even overnight, the top of the head inside the valve cover will be coated with residual oil that was pumped up earlier during running operation. The rubber valve seal has also cooled during nonoperation, which causes it to contract and leave a small gap. When the engine first starts up, residual oil gets sucked down through the bad seal and into the combustion chamber. A large cloud of blue-white smoke will be seen exiting the tailpipe just after start-up.

Idle and Stop and Go Driving

    Bad valve seals will show themselves during prolonged idling at stop signs or stop lights in congested city conditions. When the vehicle sits at idle for prolonged periods, high levels of vacuum at the intake manifold result because the throttle valve remains closed. The high vacuum attracts oil in the heads to congregate around the valve stems. Upon acceleration, the oil gets sucked past the eroding seal and down through the valve guide, where it burns in the exhaust. Huge clouds of blue-white smoke exit the tailpipe after each acceleration from a stop. The burning smoke will disappear during cruising or highway speed.

Off-Throttle Braking

    Evidence of valve seals being compromised will show up during off-throttle braking, especially when descending a steep downgrade where the accelerator pedal remains static. With the creation of high intake manifold vacuum, coupled with the downward slant of the engine, oil collects toward the front of the valve cover over the head. Upon pushing the accelerator after a long coast, burned oil will exit the tailpipe in copious amounts. The engine will continue to burn the oil longer in this case, but it will still be a temporary condition until finally the smoking stops under normal cruise.

Oil Consumption

    Bad valve seals will cause excessive oil consumption. In an otherwise normal engine with good compression, rings and valve guides, bad seals will cause a loss of oil that can be detected on the oil dipstick. By keeping an accurate record of oil level on the dipstick, a noticeable oil reduction due to the oil being burned along with the fuel will be discovered. Bad seals will be confirmed if no oil leaks can be found on the engine to account for the loss.

Excessive Smoke

    If the valve seals have deteriorated enough, the blue-white exhaust smoke will last longer after start-up and acceleration. Yet the smoke will eventually disappear after long engine operation or during periods of hot weather. Bad valve seals nearly always show an intermittent problem of oil burning, whereas worn piston rings and valve guides will smoke during all times of engine operation and never disappear.