Kamis, 30 Desember 2010

How to Troubleshoot a 1990 Chevy 1500 Truck

How to Troubleshoot a 1990 Chevy 1500 Truck

The 1990 Chevy 1500 features the squared body design and a 4.3 liter, V6 engine. The vehicle was introduced as a fuel economy vehicle without sacrificing the hauling and towing capabilities. Troubleshooting engine problems is achieved through listening and feeling for changes in the performance. Troubleshooting breakdowns is achieved by using the process of elimination to separate functioning parts from failing parts. The vehicle does not use a computer diagnostics system and owners can make repairs without an electronic reader.

Instructions

    1

    Turn the key and test the battery by turning on the interior light and radio. If the lights are weak and they flutter while attempting to start, charge the battery with jumper cables and a running vehicle. If the battery does not hold the charge, replace it with a new one. Replace the alternator if the battery continues to lose the charge.

    2

    Turn the key to start the engine. If the engine cranks but does not fire, replace the spark plugs. If the plugs do not help, clean the fuel injectors. If the truck continues to fail, replace the fuel pump.

    3

    Replace the starter if the battery and alternator are good but the engine will not crank when you turn the key. The Chevy truck is likely to require a new tarter every three or four years. The starter is especially likely to fail in cold environments.

    4

    Test drive the truck on a flat surface and vary the speed to test the transmission. If the transmission is in bad condition it will grind and jump gears. The transmission should shift smoothly without excessive revving and overworking.

    5

    Feel for pulling and vibrating as you drive. The four-wheel drive lockers will stick on the hubs if the transfer case malfunctions. Shift the vehicle between two wheel drive and four-wheel drive several times release the lockers from the hubs. Have the transfer case serviced if the four wheel will not release.

Troubleshooting Auto Turbochargers

The turbocharger is the heart of the turbo system, forcing pressurized air into the engine for substantially increased horsepower. However, due to the extreme heat and pressure the turbocharger experiences under normal operation, problems with the internal turbo components can develop over time. Additionally, problems with the intercooler system and other supporting components can cause your turbocharger to perform poorly. Troubleshooting many of the common problems that develop with turbo systems is made easy by observing your vehicle's boost gauge, as it gives you a real-time readout of the turbocharger's performance. If your vehicle lacks a boost gauge, you can still troubleshoot most turbocharger issues by paying close attention to the turbo's sound and performance.

Instructions

Inspection

    1

    Ensure that the engine is fully cooled down so that you can safely inspect the turbo system. Open the hood and check every vacuum line for signs of damage. Since vacuum lines are generally made of rubber, they are prone to developing cracks over time due to the extreme temperatures reached in the engine bay. Make sure each vacuum line is securely connected to its proper location. A loose or damaged vacuum line will allow for boost leaks, which lead to numerous turbocharger performance problems.

    2

    Inspect the turbocharger unit for signs of oil or coolant leakage. If there is fluid buildup on or around the turbo unit, it likely indicates worn internal seals. Have your turbocharger rebuilt as soon as possible if this is the case, as improper lubrication will lead to worn internal components over time, as well as overheating issues.

    3

    Remove the turbocharger so that you can inspect the internal components. The removal process varies between engines, so refer to a shop maintenance manual if you are unsure of the required procedure. Generally, you have to remove the intake system, exhaust heat shield and any other components obstructing movement of the turbocharger. Then, detach all oil and coolant lines from the turbo housing. (Some engines require that you drain the oil and coolant before detaching the lines.) Finally, remove the four bolts that secure the turbocharger to the exhaust manifold, then remove the entire turbo unit.

    4

    Grip the shaft that connects the turbines by reaching into the turbocharger inlet. Check for shaft play by attempting to wiggle the shaft up and down. Any movement in the shaft indicates worn bearings in the turbocharger that must be replaced immediately to avoid damage to the turbines or housing.

    5

    Peer into the turbocharger inlet and outlet to inspect the internal components. Nicks in the turbine blades or housing indicate shaft play, as the turbine blades are likely rubbing against the housing when in operation. Alternatively, any debris in the turbo housing can cause nicks and dents on the turbines.

    6

    Look for any oil buildup inside the turbo housing. The presence of oil on the turbines or housing indicates that the shaft seals are leaking and should be replaced immediately. This is especially common on the compressor side of the turbocharger due to the pressure levels it experiences.

    7

    Inspect the entire turbo housing closely for signs of cracking. Cracked housing can be caused by the extreme heat levels generated by the turbocharger. If cracks are present, the housing needs to be repaired or replaced immediately to avoid worsening pressure leaks and other performance issues.

Driving Tests

    8

    Start your vehicle and allow the engine to reach normal operating temperature. Drive to a safe and legal location at which you can accelerate the engine to redline.

    9

    Accelerate to redline and note any unusual noises coming from the turbocharger. An excessive whining noise indicates that the bearings are becoming worn. If the bearings are failing, you will hear an occasional metallic grinding noise. This is due to the turbo shaft or turbines grinding against the turbocharger housing.

    10

    Note any acceleration issues the engine experiences. Failing turbo components and boost leaks will make the engine feel hesitant under full acceleration, as the turbocharger is unable to provide the proper level of boost.

    11

    Note boost spiking or creeping behavior as indicated by the boost gauge. Often caused by an improperly actuating wastegate or boost controller, a boost spike causes the turbo pressure to briefly rise several psi above the proper setting when the engine is fully accelerated. Extreme boost spikes can lead to a damaged turbocharger and/or internal engine components. Boost creep is a situation in which the turbo pressure reaches its preset maximum value, then slowly increases until the engine redline. This is often due to the wastegate failing to open properly.

The Reasons a New Battery May Drain on a 1990 Chevrolet Corvette

The Reasons a New Battery May Drain on a 1990 Chevrolet Corvette

The 1990 Chevrolet Corvette has reports of the battery draining, and the manufacturer has even published technical service bulletins (TSBs) concerning this problem. A 1990 Chevrolet Corvette's new battery may drain for a number of reasons. Most problems stem from the wiring problems the Corvette found in this 1990 Chevrolet.

Accessories Draining Battery

    New batteries installed in 1990 Chevrolet Corvette commonly drain due to the memory required for the power seats and stereo. Most 1990 Corvettes have a memory program in the automobile's computer used for stereo and seat settings. The memory can drain the new battery when used excessively. You can install a battery disconnect switch to correct this power drain problem, or you can add a trickle charger to maintain the new battery's voltage.

Wiring Harness Problems

    The wiring harness on the 1990 Chevrolet Corvette causes the new battery to drain voltage. According to reports from the manufacturer sent out in technical service bulletins (TSBs) to dealerships, the wiring harness under the dash or instrument panel causes the new battery to lose voltage when the Corvette is not operating. This problem occurs when splices in the wiring harness are not installed properly, which causes a short that operates accessories when the Corvette is not turned on. The only correction for this voltage problem involves having the entire wiring harness replaced by a qualified technician or at the Corvette dealership.

Lighting System Problems

    Another TSB published on the 1990 Chevrolet Corvette concerns a problem with the lighting under the hood remaining on and draining the new battery of voltage. In these cases, the mercury switch that controls the lighting under the hood either shorts or partially engages, causing the circuit to remain open even when the Corvette is not in operation. This open circuit allows the light under the hood of the Chevrolet to remain on and drains the voltage from the new battery. If your Corvette has this problem, you must replace the mercury switch so the battery will not lose its charge overnight.

Rabu, 29 Desember 2010

How to Troubleshoot a '93 BMW 325

How to Troubleshoot a '93 BMW 325

The BMW 3 series represent a high point of small sports car design. The car's balance, frame and suspension all work together to give the car excellent handling. However, the 325 is the base model with the lowest output engine. The 325 is a best-selling model and is cheaper than the 330 or M3. There are a number of issues that can crop up with a 1993 325 as it ages. The automatic transmission has proven to be problematic and the fuel pumps are a problem across every BMW model.

Instructions

    1

    Inspect the car while it is parked on a flat surface so that you can judge each suspension corner equally. Even with the base engine, the 325 preserved a close to 50/50 balance between the front/rear and the left/right. If the 325 is sitting lower on one corner than any of the others, then there may be a problem with the suspension on that well.

    Look inside the wheel well. If any of the control arms are broken, then the car must be flat-bedded to a mechanic as it is unsafe to drive. If the spring suspension has lost tension, then the car can be driven to a mechanic for replacement if it is within a few miles.

    2

    Open the hood and inspect the engine bay. The battery should be free of corrosion and acid foam. If there is corrosion, then the car may refuse to start. If the battery is bubbling, then you need a mechanic to properly handle a leaking battery. Inspect the air intake for any cracks. The engine will still run, but it will be short on power due to the lack of air. The air intake can be patched, but it is best to replace it (they are relatively cheap). Look at the radiator for any damage to the cooling fins. If the fins are bent, then the car could overheat and damage the engine.

    3

    Turn the 325 on and listen for the engine to turn over. If the engine does not turn on then the fuel pump may broken. The pump may not be supplying the proper amount of gas to the ignition chambers. The fuel pump will need to be replaced by a BMW dealership, as it is not sold on the open market to non-BMW dealers.

    4

    Shift the car into "Drive" if it is an automatic. Listen for the gears to change over. If there is a load clunk, then the automatic is on its last legs. If the car does not drive forward after being put into "Drive," then the transmission is shot and needs to be replaced. If the car is a manual, then shift into first. Press the clutch down and feel for the clutch plate to engage. If the clutch does not engage, then the friction pad on the clutch is worn out and needs to be replaced as soon as possible. If first gear will not engage, then the teeth on the gears may have broken off. The transmission needs to be replaced if the gears are broken.

Selasa, 28 Desember 2010

My Chevy Lumina Stops Running and Won't Start Until Cooled Down

The Chevy Lumina was General Motors' answer to the Ford Taurus. It was a front-wheel drive sedan based on the near ubiquitous W-body platform. Unfortunately, it was made during the 90s, the low point of GM reliability. As a result, the Lumina has not aged well. There are a number of issues that could cause the engine to stop running and not start until it cools, the most likely being the radiator. GM used very cheap hoses on the radiator lines and they have a tendency to become brittle and break, thus leaking radiator fluid.

Instructions

    1

    Drive the car somewhere out of traffic and where it will not block anyone in. If the car is disastrously broken, then it may not be mobile for some time. Pull the emergency brake before you shut the car off to be safe. Pop the hood of the sedan and prop it up with the hood prop stick that lies on the side of the engine bay.

    2

    Inspect the radiator fluid reservoir in the back of the engine bay to see if it is full. If it is empty, then you have a leak somewhere. If you have not filled your reservoir up for some time, then you have likely baked the engine oil and that will need to be changed soon. Inspect the tank itself for any leaks. Then run your hands back along the coolant lines to the radiator, feeling for any leaks. If the line feels hard, then it is starting to go brittle and must be replaced; it has already started to leak fluid out through evaporation.

    3

    Inspect the radiator for any leaks or damage. The fins should all be straight and there should be no radiator fluid coming out anywhere. If any of those flaws exist, then the radiator needs to be replaced. In addition, look at the engine itself for any coolant leaks. The head gasket in the Chevy Lumina was made of paper and will go bad after a few years. If there are coolant leaks coming out along the seam between the intake manifold and the engine block, then the head gasket has failed and needs to be replaced.

What Are the Dangers of Running Lean?

What Are the Dangers of Running Lean?

In combustion engines, "running lean" goes beyond using gas efficiently. In effect, that status makes the engine perform with less gasoline than it needs to operate properly, and it increase the amount of friction between the engine's moving parts. Running lean can damage an engine.

What Running Lean Involves

    When an engine runs lean, there is an imbalance in the air/fuel mixture. Particularly in two-stroke engines, the term refers to the engine not receiving enough gasoline compared to the amount of oxygen used in the combustion process. Very little gasoline is required for combustion, but enough is needed to keep piston chambers cool while operating. Modern engines added additional cooling systems to help with that problem, but a lean running engine can still occur due to improper fuel mixes.

'Soft Seize'

    A "soft seize" signifies the damage caused by excess friction between an engine piston and the piston cylinder wall. At some point in the piston cycle, a momentary dry spot occurs where the metal rubs together. That rubbing can cause burns or friction scoring on the side of the piston. If sufficient fuel flow returns, the piston will work as normal, but the damage remains. Eventually, the pistons in lean-running engines will develop enough damage to fail.

Hard Seizure

    In a hard seizure, the engine is running so lean that the piston and chamber have heated up more than tolerances will allow -- the piston basically grinds against the cylinder wall until it sticks fast. The crankshaft arm then can bends and snap or the connecting rod can break. The damage is severe and will require the engine to either be rebuilt or replaced.

Engine Cut Out

    When the engine fuel supply is so lean that combustion can't even occur, the engine dies out and stops working. In comparison to seizing, this lean-running danger is actually better because the operator can quickly put the vehicle in neutral before the engine stalls completely. When the fuel flow is restored to a sufficient level again, the engine will run as normal. Engine cut outs are warnings to check the fuel system and make necessary repairs or adjustments.

How to Test for Exhaust Leaks

How to Test for Exhaust Leaks

A vehicle's exhaust system has a two-fold purpose -- it quiets engine noise while pushing toxic fumes away from the car's interior. Leaks in the exhaust system could allow the gases to waft into the passenger compartment, injuring or even killing riders with enough exposure. Mufflers and exhaust pipes break down with age. Winter weather, especially regularly driving on salted roads, exacerbates the decay. Always check your exhaust system for leaks if you hear noise from the area, or feel dizzy or nauseous while driving -- these could be symptoms of carbon monoxide in the passenger cabin.

Instructions

    1

    Park your vehicle on a flat, paved surface and wait for it to cool completely before testing it. Put on protective eye wear, such as safety goggles, then slide under the car so you have a good view of the exhaust system.

    2

    Shine a flashlight on the exhaust system, starting at the tail pipe and working back toward the manifold. Check for a white powdery substance on connections between the exhaust system components. This indicates a leak in the manifold region.

    3

    Apply even pressure with pliers at several points along the exhaust system pipes. Stop immediately if any pipe gives under the pressure. Yielding pipes are signs of decay and indicate a leak is likely at that point.

    4

    Tap a wrench firmly along the exhaust system components, listening for a ringing sound that indicates the parts are not leaking. Thuds, on the other hand, signal corrosion and possible leaks. Do not tap the catalytic converter -- it will damage the part.

    5

    Slide out from underneath the car and kneel by the car's side so you have a good view of the exhaust system. Ask an assistant to start the car and stare at the exhaust area. Check for puffs or steady streams of smoke that come out of anywhere except the tail pipe. Errant smoke release is a sure sign of exhaust leaks.

Senin, 27 Desember 2010

Plymouth Breeze Speedometer Problems

Plymouth Breeze Speedometer Problems

The Plymouth Breeze has several reports and technical service bulletins (TSB) concerning the speedometer problems Breeze owners are experiencing. Both mechanical and electrical problems are occurring with the speedometer of the Breeze. The speedometer on the dash panel of the Breeze informs the operator of their current speed and miles driven.

Speed Sensor Problem

    The Plymouth Breeze is having a continuous problem with the speed sensor corroding. Once the speed sensor corrodes, it affects the speedometer and cruise control and makes it difficult to shift gears. The speed sensor is located on the transmission and is susceptible to road debris that can corrode the connection of the speed sensor causing the it to fail; if poor contact is made at the connector contact points the speedometer does not work properly. The Plymouth owner needs to take the Breeze into the dealership to have this part replaced and the connections cleaned.

Wiring Problems

    A TSB is published by the manufacturer of the Plymouth Breeze concerning wiring problems that are affecting the instrument panel. The speedometer and the other gauges may not be working because the wiring harness is not properly spliced. Two TSBs are published as to the correct way technicians are to splice the wiring harness, and if the splicing does not correct the problem, then a complete new wiring harness needs to be installed in the Breeze.

Speedometer Mechanics

    The speedometer on the Plymouth Breeze is failing because the mechanics of the instrument is breaking. This device utilizes a needle which points at number on a dial; the needle mechanics on the speedometer has been the subject of reports and complaints of breakage during operation. Many of these reports state that the small gears which turn the speedometer needle are coming loose or breaking entirely under normal driving conditions. The only correction for this speedometer problem in the Plymouth Breeze is to have the entire speedometer device replaced.

What Happens When a Water Pump Breaks?

Water pumps circulate water between a motor vehicle's radiator and engine to cool the engine. When a water pump breaks, that typically causes engine temperature to rise, and the overheating can lead to a breakdown.

Indications

    The most common indications are a steady increase in temperature, and leaking from the radiator, cooling hoses, or the pump itself, according to the website AA1 Car. These are often accompanied by an initial screeching sound. As the engine gets hotter, a knocking sound might follow.

Oil

    When the pump fails and the engine temperature increases, the heat starts breaking down the oil. This makes it a less effective lubricant. This increases friction, causing the temperature to rise and engine parts to wear.

Breakdown

    If engine becomes too hot, the mixture of gas and air can ignite prematurely. This can raise the temperature of the pistons so much that they begin to expand and become too large to move through the cylinders. This stops the engine.

Sabtu, 25 Desember 2010

Symptoms of a 1994 Honda Civic Fuel Pump Failure

Symptoms of a 1994 Honda Civic Fuel Pump Failure

Fuel pumps should give you thousands of miles of trouble-free service. To ensure that possibility, there are preventive measures you can take to protect your fuel pump. The 1994 Honda Civic models' fuel pump is located inside the gas tank. If you continually allow your tank to get extremely low, the fuel pump is sucking sediment from the bottom of the tank, clogging your fuel filter and damaging your fuel pump. On the other hand, if you are already having problems you may be noticing distinctive symptoms.

Hard Start

    Your 1994 Honda Civic has an electric fuel pump. When you turn on the ignition, the fuel is ready to go, unlike in older cars when you had to pump your gas pedal. However, when the fuel pump is failing the flow of gas is not steady and your vehicle may be hard to start or it stalls.

Sluggish

    If your Civic is sluggish when you step on the gas or it misfires, these are symptoms that your fuel pump maybe having problems. Always use the correct octane of fuel in your vehicle and purchase gasoline from a name-brand gas station to prevent getting low-quality fuel. (It may have dirt and water in it.)

Check Engine Light

    When your Civics' electric fuel pump is having problems, your vehicle's computer sensors will get a signal. The message will be relayed to you on your instrument panel, causing the check engine light to come on.

What Kind of Problems Does a Worn CV Joint Cause?

What Kind of Problems Does a Worn CV Joint Cause?

A Constant Velocity joint is vital to a car's normal operation and usually creates a few noticeable problems when it becomes worn. Identifying problems as warning signs before your CV joint fails will prevent you from being stranded.

Noises

    You will notice loud noises coming from the front end of your car like clicking, clunking, popping or ticking that usually indicate a worn CV joint. The noises are most noticeable when turning during tight corners but could also be heard while driving down a straight road.

Torn CV Boot

    A worn CV joint can often cause a worn or torn CV boot and cause the CV joint to lose lubrication and shorten the joint's life dramatically. A CV boot can be repaired, and this can prolong the life of a CV joint. You can notice a tear in a CV boot after the CV joint has lost too much lubrication by a puddle of fluid on the ground, and the CV joint most likely will need replacing to function normally.

Why Replace a Worn CV Joint

    Replacing a worn CV joint when the problems first arise can save you the trouble of dealing with a completely failed CV joint. A completely failed CV joint will leave you with a car that will not be able to move on its own. The problems a worn CV joint creates are not urgent and don't require instant fixing but are a definite sign of the part failing. Have your mechanic visually inspect your CV joint at every oil change.

Jumat, 24 Desember 2010

What Are the Causes of Low Idle in a Subaru Outback?

What Are the Causes of Low Idle in a Subaru Outback?

The Subaru Outback uses the same reliable four or six cylinder opposed engine as its companion models. It is computer controlled and uses several sensors to communicate with the programmable control module. Diagnosing a low idle condition requires reading the data stored in the computer.

Computer Code Readers

    Getting information from the computer requires the use of an OBD-II scanner. While the dealers use expensive proprietary machines, inexpensive consumer-grade models are readily available at any auto parts store. The devices come with a book or website that will explain the trouble codes.

Minor Problems

    A leaking vacuum hose or fitting, a leaking EGR valve or clogged air filter can be a cause of poor idling. These issues are easily repaired with simple tools.

Serious Issues

    Low fuel pump pressure is considered serious because the pump replacement procedure is labor intensive. Leaking head gaskets, worn camshaft lobes and worn timing belts require expensive repair procedures and specialized equipment.

Troubleshooting Guides for Brake Systems

Troubleshooting Guides for Brake Systems

Every motorist understands the importance of the automobile braking system. The driver's worst nightmare comes true when the brakes do not behave as expected. When the brakes squeal we wince with embarrassment. When the brakes vibrate we shudder with apprehension, and if the brake pedal sinks to the floor our hearts stop and our lives flash before our eyes. Fortunately, basic troubleshooting of the brake system is a simple task that every vehicle owner can learn to do for themselves.

Instructions

    1

    Listen for noises from your wheels while driving, and especially when braking. The most common noise made by the brakes is a high-pitched squeal. If the squeal can be heard even when the brakes are not applied it may be caused by the metal-leaf wear indicators that some pad manufacturers include in their pads to warn the driver that the pads are worn out. If the pads are new, you should expect a slight brake squeal for the first 300 miles or so of driving while the new pads wear in. Otherwise, adding soft, noise-reducing shims to the backs of the shoes can quiet most squeals. If you hear a scraping or grinding noise it likely means that one or more of the pads has failed completely and the brakes should be inspected immediately. A clunking noise probably means something in the brake is loose, and again an immediate inspection is called for.

    2

    Check whether the brakes pull to one side or the other during braking. The most common cause of brake pull is a seized front caliper on the wheel opposite the direction of the pull. If the pull is combined with a drastic reduction in brake performance, it may be caused by the failure of one of the two master cylinder chambers, or by brake fluid leaking from one of the brake cylinders onto the pads and rotor. If a grinding or scraping noise accompanies the brake pull, it can mean that the brake pads on one wheel have failed or worn out completely. Other possible causes of brake pull include a plugged brake line or a seized brake cylinder on one wheel. Possible causes not directly related to the brakes are improperly inflated tires and incorrect front-end alignment.

    3

    Check whether the brakes grab suddenly. This can be caused by a buildup of dust and dirt on the rotor and pads, or inside the drums, which often results from extended driving on dirt roads. Grabbing brakes can also indicate a problem with the power booster or the proportioning valve. If the grabbing is accompanied by a loud scraping or grinding noise, it can indicate that the brake pads have failed.

    4

    Check for pulsation or vibration during braking. Vibration can be caused by a disc rotor that is misaligned, warped or cracked, or by a brake drum that is cracked or out-of-round.

    5

    Test the operation of the power vacuum booster and master cylinder. Hold the brake pedal down with the engine running. The pedal should have a firm feel and it should not drop toward the floor with time. A spongy feel can indicate air trapped in the brake lines, while a hard feel can indicate a defective power booster. If the pedal feels normal but slowly sinks toward the floor, it can indicate an internal leak in the master cylinder. Now stop the engine while continuing to hold the brake pedal down. The pedal should stay in one position. If it slowly rises with time, it can indicate a leak in the power booster or a bad booster check valve. Now pump the brakes a few times and note where the brake pedal stops. It should stop in a slightly higher position with each pump. As a final test, hold the brake pedal down and start the engine. The brake pedal should drop about 1/4 of an inch, indicating that the booster is operating properly.

    6

    Check the level and condition of the brake fluid. Park the vehicle, open the hood and locate the brake fluid reservoir. It is usually located near the rear of the engine compartment on the driver's side. Open the cap and look inside. The fluid should have a clean and homogeneous appearance. If the fluid is brown or if you see scum or contamination floating on the surface, then the fluid should be replaced. The fluid level should be between the maximum and minimum marks on the reservoir. A low fluid level can allow air to enter the master cylinder or brake lines, and it also usually indicates that there is a leak in the system. Be sure to use brake fluid that meets the manufacturer's specifications when topping the reservoir. Also, thoroughly check the system for leaks, paying particular attention to the connections between the brake lines and the master cylinder as well as the brake lines and cylinder seals at each wheel brake.

Problems With Windshield Wiper Motor Plugs

Problems With Windshield Wiper Motor Plugs

Windshield wipers may not seem like a big car maintenance and repair topic, but nothing protects you more than windshield wipers on a rainy or snowy day. Without the windshield wipers, you would probably be driving blind and likely cause an accident, injuring yourself and possibly others. Among the things that can go wrong with windshield wipers are the wiper motor connections. Problems with these connections can render your wipers useless.

Corrosion

    The windshield wiper assembly has two connectors that attach to the windshield wiper motors. Corrosion can occur on these connections, inhibiting the transfer of electricity to the motors and rendering the windshield wipers useless. By simply removing the connector on the bottom of the motor and cleaning the corrosion off with a brass bristled brush, you will keep the connection intact and uninterrupted.

Disconnection

    The connectors for the windshield wiper motor are crimped onto the low-voltage power distribution wires. Sometimes, the wire connector is not crimped onto the wire tightly enough and falls out of the connector, keeping the windshield wiper from functioning. A new connector will need to be inserted on the tip of the wire and crimped to it so that the exposed portion of the wire is touching the connector. When this is plugged back into the motor, the windshield wiper should function properly.

Rust

    On older vehicles, the windshield wiper motor is fully exposed on the underside of where the hood attaches to the vehicle. When the seals deteriorate around the windshield wipers on the top side of the vehicle, water can drip down the motor and wick underneath the motor, causing the connectors to rust. In this situation, the connectors will have to be replaced, and the windshield wiper motor may need to be replaced as well.

Kamis, 23 Desember 2010

What Makes Power Steering Pumps Leak Out of the Reservoir?

The power steering system on your vehicle is made up of three main components: the power steering pump, pump reservoir and steering rack. On occasion, the power steering pump reservoir can leak, potentially causing problems.

Cracks

    Most power steering reservoirs are made of plastic. Over time, this plastic can become brittle from the constant heat under the hood. This can cause cracking that creates a power steering leak.

Seals

    The power steering reservoir has several rubber seals that keep the fluid inside. With age, these seals may become weak or brittle and begin allowing power steering fluid to leak from the reservoir.

Cap

    The power steering reservoir has a plastic cap that keeps the fluid inside but allows for periodic inspection. This cap can become distorted and allow the fluid to leak.

Hoses

    There are rubber hoses on some power steering units that transfer the fluid from the reservoir to the pump. With age, or due to impact, these hoses may become brittle and begin leaking from where they connect to the reservoir.

How Can I Tell If a Windshield Is Defective?

How Can I Tell If a Windshield Is Defective?

Your car's windshield is made of two pieces of safety glass that have a plastic laminate layer in between them. On occasion, a car is manufactured with a defective or flawed windshield. Often, you will not realize your windshield is defective until you have a problem with the windshield or it breaks and has to be replaced. If you suspect your car has a defective windshield, there are several signs that you should look for.

Instructions

    1

    Look for flaws in the windshield. If the windshield appears wavy, uneven or to have wrinkles in it, its likely that glass is defective. Defective windshields should be replaced immediately because they are weaker than normal windshields and more prone to incur damage due to normal use.

    2

    Check the area around your windshield for leaks. If your windshield is slightly flawed, is not exactly the right size or has been improperly installed, your windshield may not fit the car properly. If your windshield does not fit the car properly, there is a good chance it will leak when it rains or the car goes through a high-pressure car wash. Take a vehicle with a leaking windshield in for repair immediately, as water can damage the inside of your car.

    3

    Look for cracks or other signs of damage on your windshield. All windshields are susceptible to damage from flying rocks and debris, but if your windshield is very easily damaged or cracks without a perceptible cause, your windshield may be defective.

Rabu, 22 Desember 2010

What Could Cause the Horn Not to Work on a 1988 BS10 Blazer?

What Could Cause the Horn Not to Work on a 1988 BS10 Blazer?

An inoperative horn may seem like a minor annoyance, but it is actually a serious safety concern. The inability to warn pedestrians and fellow motorists of one's presence might result in dire consequences. Municipalities that require vehicle inspections consider a working horn to be a basic safety device, and passage of the inspection can be denied for this shortfall. The horn circuitry in a S-10 Blazer was rudimentary in 1988, and the steering wheel is uncluttered by other electronic controls or air bags. Still, you might consider seeking professional assistance with repairs inside the steering wheel or column.

The Beeper

    Diagnostic efforts could be wasted if the entire horn circuit is examined without first ensuring that the horn itself is not at fault. Horns that fail to sound when battery voltage is applied to them are most likely in need of replacement. A horn with a weak response may benefit from adjustments to the small tone screw that extends out of the horn body. The mounting bracket for the horn also provides the electrical ground for the attached beeper, as long as it is in the original position, and free of corrosion. Jumper wires or test lights can be used to confirm good grounds and voltage delivery. Replace a horn that does not respond to adjustments or direct voltage application.

The Supply

    The horn circuitry of an S-10 Blazer of this model year is protected by a fuse in the main fuse block. The fuse spade lugs plug into receptors in the block, and the lugs and fuse link are encased in colored transparent plastic. The color of the plastic fuse body helps determine the load rating for the fuse, should the numbers embossed on the top of the fuse be illegible. A small metallic band connects the two spade lugs inside the fuse body and is visible through the colored plastic. Any break in this small strip denotes a "blown" fuse. Replace a blown fuse with a new one that matches the rating that is inscribed on the fuse block, or specified in the truck owner's manual.

The Relay

    Another protection device in the horn circuit is the relay. The relay is constantly energized, and it transfers power to the horn when electrical ground is supplied. Depressing the horn button completes the ground circuit to the relay. Any arcing or heat generated by power distribution is contained in the relay, rather than the horn button. Substituting a known good relay, like the one in the headlamp circuit, can help eliminate the relay as the circuit fault. This method is fine for temporary diagnostic purposes, but a replacement relay must match the specifications for the circuit. Replace the horn relay with the proper part, if a substitute restores function. Otherwise, return the relays to their original positions.

The Wheel Deal

    There are moving parts in both the horns and the relays, but the circuitry in the steering wheel are subject to more frequent manipulation. Constant steering wheel movements and adjustment to the tilting steering column can fatigue the wires, contacts and switches therein. A replacement fuse that blows upon installation can indicate a problem anywhere in the horn circuit. Horns that sound continuously after a new fuse is installed usually signal problems in the horn button assembly, or steering column wire harness. It may be necessary to remove the steering wheel to effectively diagnose or repair these parts. Seek professional assistance if you lack the special tools or familiarity needed to complete this procedure.

Causes of Lower Ball-Joint Failure

Causes of Lower Ball-Joint Failure

Ball joints connect a car's control arms to the wheels. They can swivel in any direction on the axis and rotate as the wheels are steered. Lower ball joints are extremely important because if a lower ball joint fails, the end wheelpoint that goes with it can turn in any direction and make steering impossible. It can also release and eject the spring. Springs are usually ejected with great force that can badly damage other parts of your vehicle or other vehicles or even injure nearby pedestrians.

Worn-out Ball Joint

    Ball joints wear out just like any other piece of machinery, especially one in a car. The ball joint itself can become worn over time or damaged; you may even receive a rare defective lower-ball joint, which is more prone to failure. In this case, the defect usually isn't obvious until the joint has already failed. If you have your car repaired for another reason or just want it checked by a mechanic, request a lower ball-joint inspection.

Damaged Boots

    The rubber boots sealing the lower ball joints can become old and worn, cracking and allowing dirt, water, and other debris onto the lower ball joints. This causes them to wear out quickly.

    If you notice that your rubber boots seem worn or cracked, replace them immediately to prevent an accident or to save a life.

Car Accident

    If you have a car accident, your lower ball joints could fail. It could be from the impact of the accident if it was bad enough. The failed rubber boots allow water, dirt and debris to enter and wear out the lower ball joints, but when you have any sort of accident of high impact or even water submersion, it could cause enough damage to allow such matter to enter and wear out the lower ball joints.

Water Engine Damage

Water Engine Damage

Getting water inside your car engine, due to driving in extreme conditions or suffering from flooding, provides a bad recipe for disaster. Particularly if the vehicle has been submerged for any period of time, water can work its way into much of the engine system.

Signs of Damage

    The most immediate signs of engine damage from water exposure will likely be found in the engine oil and transmission fluid. By just checking the fluids with a dipstick you can see if there has been exposure. Water will make the transmission fluid look milky in consistency. Water in the oil pan will also dilute the engine oil as well.

Impact

    Water damage can affect the lubrication system and electrical wiring. As the engine parts malfunction odd and loud noises will likely be heard after a car engine has been exposed. The noise can come from the alternator, the belts, or the air conditioner among a number of possibilities.

Repair

    The best approach with engine water exposure involves not starting the car at all. Instead, the car should be towed to the nearest mechanic to be looked over first. Trying to start the car if there is water inside will likely contribute to serious damage as lubrication may fail and engine parts may grind.

How Do You Know If Your Water Pump Is Out?

Cooling systems comprise two basic parts: the radiator -- aka heat exchanger -- that sheds heats from the coolant into air passing through, and the water pump, which delivers coolant to the radiator. Water pumps and radiators generally don't tend to outright fail so much as they do fade away by degrees. Diagnosis is generally a simple affair; all you really need are a few basic guidelines to troubleshoot the assembly.

Shaft Play

    Water pump shaft bearings take a beating, and they will fail over time. Shaft failures generally start out as a squeak or whine and then progress to a constant squeal that precedes water pump failure. One way to check shaft play and bearing wear is to remove the water pump drive belt and try to move the shaft up and down, into and out of the housing. A used water pump will have a bit more in-and-out play than a new pump, but any amount of up-and-down play -- aka "wobble" -- is a sign of severe bearing wear.

Seal Failure

    Bearing failure usually comes in tandem with main shaft seal failure, as one can easily cause the other. Excess bearing play can damage the shaft seal, resulting in a water leak around the shaft where it goes into the housing. Water leaking past the seal and into the bearing will drastically accelerate wear inside the bearing, causing premature failure. The short story is that, if you see coolant coming out of anywhere on the water pump, then the seal is shot.

Impeller Damage

    The pump's impeller is its "water wheel," the fan-like device that pushes water through your engine. Impeller wear isn't uncommon, particularly in the case of plastic impellers. A worn or broken impeller will reduce pumping efficiency, allowing water to leak around the impeller instead of going through the radiator as it should. The symptoms here are generally fairly subtle unless something suddenly breaks, in which case you may notice an immediate rise in coolant temperature. Cavitation is a condition wherein the pump doesn't get enough water flow for its rpm, causing it to churn the water and turn it into steam. Cavitation is often audible, and sounds like a loud whine or hiss that rises or falls in sync with engine rpm.

Lack of Flow

    The ultimate test for any water pump is to test whether or not it's actually pumping water. The easiest way to do this is to take the radiator cap off of your radiator, get the engine up to operating temperature to open the thermostat and watch for water coming out of the upper radiator hose. At anything above idle, the water should come out with enough force that it splashes in the radiator and possibly out of the cap. If your water is coming out as a trickle at 4,000 rpm with the engine overheating, then you've got a problem.

Selasa, 21 Desember 2010

Trailer Hitch Wiring Problems & Solutions

Trailer Hitch Wiring Problems & Solutions

Judging from the number of trailers traveling the highways with no rear lights or improperly working lights, you might think that getting them to work properly is a difficult or highly technical procedure. In reality, it's a simple matter of getting 12 volts of electricity to a properly grounded lightbulb.

Function

    Most trailers operate on a four-wire system that connects the tow vehicle's wiring system to the trailer's wiring system. One wire (usually brown) runs to the tail or running lights and is energized whenever the parking lights or headlights of the tow vehicle are switched on. Another wire (usually green) runs to the right taillight and is energized whenever the brakes are applied or the right turn signal is actuated. A third wire (usually yellow) runs to the left taillight and is energized whenever the brakes are applied or the left-turn signal is actuated. The final wire (usually white) is the ground and connects the trailer's light fixtures to the tow vehicle's electrical grounding system.

Check Vehicle

    Tow vehicles will either have a plug on the end of a four-wire harness or a receptacle on the rear bumper to which a matching plug at the end of the trailer's wiring harness can be inserted. Attach the grounding clip on a 12-volt test light to the ground on the tow vehicle's connector. Have an assistant turn on the tow vehicle's headlights, and touch the tester's probe to the slot on the connector into which the brown wire fits. The test light should activate. Have the assistant step on the brake pedal. The test light should turn on when inserted into the green wire slot and yellow wire slot. With the vehicle's key turned to the "run" position, have the assistant turn on the right-turn signal, then test the green wire's slot. Turn on the left-turn signal, and test the yellow wire's slot. If one of these tests fail, the problem is in the tow vehicle's wiring. If the tests show the wires on the vehicle are working, move to the trailer.

Trailer Wires

    Connect the trailer's wiring system to the tow vehicle's receptacle or plug. Go to the rear of the trailer and have your assistant run through the light tests again (headlights, brakes, turn signals), and note which function properly and which seem to be broken. Access the wires leading to each taillight assembly as close to the assembly as possible. Connect the grounding clip to the frame of the trailer or the bolt that holds the light assembly to the trailer. Make sure it's well-grounded by testing one of the wires you know is working by puncturing through the wire's insulation with the sharp tip of the test light. Now test the improperly working wire or wires by puncturing through their insulation with the test light probe. If these wires are energized to the rear of the light assembly, the problem is with the light fixture or lightbulb inside. If the wire is dead, it needs to be replaced in the trailer's wiring harness.

Considerations

    Corrosion on the trailer's electrical plug and vehicle's receptacle is often the problem. Before performing any tests, clean them off and see if the problem goes away. If the lights flicker, grow dim or brighten up when the brake lights are applied or both lights blink when a turn signal is applied, the problem is in the ground wire between the trailer and vehicle. Many boat trailers have sealed taillight fixtures, and many newer trailers have LED lights instead of bulb-type lights. Neither sealed nor LED fixtures can be disassembled to repair the inside; the whole fixture needs to be replaced if something internal goes bad. The lightbulb inside older, non-sealed fixtures should have two filaments. Usually both filaments fail simultaneously, but occasionally one will break and the other continue to function. Hold the bulb up to the sky, and make sure you can see both filaments.

2000 Ford Focus Ignition Problems

2000 Ford Focus Ignition Problems

Your 2000 Focus' ignition system is comprised of the ignition switch, the battery, several sensors, the ignition coil, and the spark plug wires and plugs. These are all linked to the car's fuel injection system and the Powertrain Control Module.

Starter Circuit and Components

    If your Focus' engine is not turning over at all, it could mean that you have a faulty battery or starter. Have your battery tested for charge and/or the starter motor and solenoid tested. Otherwise, you could have an opening in the starter circuit, which can be tested for using a high-wattage test light.

Connection Problem

    The components in the ignition system are mostly electrical, such as the sensors that send the Powertrain Control Module information to regulate the ignition timing. If the engine is turning slowly, misfiring or won't start, you may want to check all electronic connections to see if any are loose, filthy or damaged.

Spark Plugs and Wires

    The spark plugs and spark plug wires can be the cause of a few different ignition problems such as when the engine will not start, engine misfires and lack of engine power. You may want to inspect and/or replace the spark plugs and their wires if starting problems, as well as other engine problems, occur.

2002 Corvette Major Transmission Problems

The 2002 Corvette is the premier sports car manufactured by General Motors and released by Chevrolet. Major transmission problems have been reported by Corvette owners, and the manufacturer has published 128 technical service bulletins on problems with the Corvette. Several of these bulletins concern the major transmission problems experienced by Corvette owners.

Shift Solenoid Malfunction

    One of the main concerns published by the manufacturer concerning major transmission problems on the 2002 Corvette is the shift solenoid malfunction. According to Edmunds, the Corvette loses third and fourth gear during normal driving conditions, and a bulletin covers this transmission problem. The shift solenoid on the Corvette helps shift the transmission into the desired gear. The bulletin states that shifting into third gear and into fourth gear feels like the vehicle goes into neutral, causing the transmission to quit working and forward motion to be lost. This transmission problem is attributed to the shift solenoid because the connections are being contaminated with fluid, shorting out the connections as well as causing the solenoid plunger to become stuck. The only correction for this major transmission problem in the 2002 Corvette is to have the shift solenoid replaced.

Transmission Case Cracked

    Another major transmission problem reported on the 2002 Corvette is the transmission case becoming cracked and losing transmission fluid, creating internal transmission problems. One of the technical service bulletins published for the Corvette covers the transmission case cracking. No specific reason is given for the transmission case cracking, but it is attributed to more than one cause. The transmission mounts come loose, causing the transmission to vibrate and cracking the case.

    Another problem attributed to the transmission case is that the transmission assembly is not being heat-treated properly during the manufacturing process, which causes the case to crack when the internal heat of the transmission begins to rise. When a crack develops in the transmission case, the entire transmission needs to be replaced.

Transmission Bands Damaged

    The transmission bands on the 2002 Corvette can be damaged, causing the transmission to slip when the gears are shifted. The transmission bands are metal internal components that hold one gear in place as the other gear is shifted. When the bands expand, the transmission does not hold the gear in place while the other gear is shifted.

    The bulletin published by the manufacturer discusses this major transmission problem, which shows up primarily when the transmission gears are being shifted up during acceleration. Transmission slippage occurs when the operator attempts to shift gears and the Corvette hesitates between gears, then jerks when the gear is engaged. The transmission needs to be completely replaced when the transmission bands are discovered to be damaged.

Senin, 20 Desember 2010

Head Gasket Sealing Problems

Head Gasket Sealing Problems

A head gasket creates a seal between the engine block and the cylinder head. Though the gasket is simple and inexpensive, the difficulty of replacing the gasket makes getting a proper seal the first time important.

Block and Head Inspection

    Chances are that a head gasket failed due to an engine being overheated. This overheating may cause physical damage to the block or head, which will cause the gasket to not properly seal. The surfaces of the block and head that contact the gasket should be inspected for cracks or warping before the gasket is installed.

Cleaning Head and Block

    The surfaces of the head and block that contact the gasket should be cleaned to remove any debris from previous gaskets or sealants to allow for a proper seal. A plastic scraper might be necessary to free some debris, but avoid using any object that will scratch the surface.

Bolt Torque

    Head gasket bolts should be tightened to the proper torque to assure that the gasket seals without being damaged. Torque data for head gaskets can be found in model-specific repair manuals. Bolts should be lightly greased with 30W engine oil before being inserted and tightened.

Minggu, 19 Desember 2010

How to Troubleshoot Jeep Wrangler Speakers

How to Troubleshoot Jeep Wrangler Speakers

Chrysler's Jeep Wrangler vehicles can include media centers with AM/FM radio, satellite radio, HD radio, six-disc CD/DVD players and MP3 music player auxiliary jacks. The stereo outputs audio to built-in speakers you can control using the head unit in the center of the dash. Problems with the speakers can can prevent them from performing as expected. Diagnose and, if possible, correct these kinds of problems through troubleshooting.

Instructions

    1

    Turn the electronic volume control to the right to increase the volume through the speakers if you can't hear anything at all. Don't turn it so far that sound distorts.

    2

    Adjust the "Balance" and "Fade" functions if audio is coming through the wrong speakers or the sound balance (left and right) or fade (front) and rear isn't right. Push the "Tune/Scroll" knob four times until the word "Balance" appears on the display. Turn the "Tune/Scroll" knob to the right or left to adjust the sound from the right or left speakers. Adjust the fade by pressing the knob a fifth time until the word "Fade" appears. Turn the knob to adjust the sound level between the front and rear speaker. Push the button again to exit the "Fade" function.

    3

    Move your cell phone away from the speakers if their sound deteriorates when you make a call. These speakers can pick up stray radio frequency interference -- a problem that can also manifest itself as booming when you use two-way radio equipment such as CB radios. Simply turn the Jeep Wrangler electronic volume down while on a call or transmitting via radio.

What Are the Causes of Oil on the Spark Plugs for a 1997 Chrysler Sebring?

Sebring coupes and convertibles of the 1997 model year share their suspension platforms and some engine options with Mitsubishi models of the era. Few reports of engine problems have been registered, regardless of configuration. Smooth operation is offered by V6 mills, which were exclusively mated to automatic transmissions. The four-bangers horsepower ratings neared that of the larger engines, and they could be partnered with manual transmissions, yielding a more spirited disposition. A Sebring of this vintage that has been favored for daily use, may well be in need of some scrupulous maintenance. Certain systems or items, left unattended, can be to blame when oil contaminates the spark plugs of this Chrysler.

Plugs and Boots

    Discovering oil on the family farm may be cause for celebration, but engine oil seen on the exposed surfaces of spark plugs is never a welcomed sight. Leaking engine gaskets can allow errant oil to collect on the portion of the spark plug that protrudes from the cylinder head. Oil amassed on the ceramic shell of the spark plug may conduct plug wire voltage away from the intended target, causing a misfire. Damage to the plug wire rubber boot is also probable, and might be just as disruptive. Valve cover gaskets are the most likely cause of such contamination, but any external engine gasket could be responsible.

Huff and Puff

    An engine crankcase is rife with fumes and solids left behind by the lubrication and combustion processes. Sebring engines contain these pollutants in a closed ventilation system, and mixes them with the air and fuel that feeds the combustion chamber. In normal doses, the sooty discharge is consumed with the other combustibles in the cylinder. Excess fumes or solids may foul the mixture in the combustion chamber, where the business end of the spark plug resides. The spark plug may be unable to ignite all of the deposits, and an oily or ashen film can form on the plug electrodes. Restrictions in the crankcase ventilation system devices or filters can cause the formations, and the symptom may worsen as the spark plug becomes less effective.

Head Aches

    Certain gaskets are tasked with sealing the passages that allow coolant and oil to reach the cylinder heads. A head gasket can fail in various ways. One type of deficiency can cause oil to accumulate on a single spark plug, if an oil passage seal next to that cylinder becomes compromised. Adjoining spark plugs that exhibit oil deposits may indicate a gasket disruption between those cylinders. This type of head gasket failure can result in decreased compression for both cylinders, and testing the pressures produced by those cylinders can help confirm this particular malady.

Job Hunting

    Engine valve stems slide through a tubular opening in the cylinder head as the valves operate. These valve guides are fitted with seals to keep engine oil from being pulled through the guides by the suction produced by piston motions. Both the seals and the guides can become worn, and allow oil into the combustion chamber. This type of engine wear is repaired in the course of a "valve job", and might be considered normal maintenance for engines with extremely high mileage. The need for this repair can be signified by uniform amounts of oil deposits on all spark plugs, but the symptom might also indicate a need to replace the piston rings. The latter service is sometimes referred to as a "ring job", and is normally only performed during a complete engine overhaul.

Sabtu, 18 Desember 2010

Problems With Remote Starts on Chryslers

Problems With Remote Starts on Chryslers

Remote starting a Chrysler has become a common feature on the new models, but many Chrysler owners are experiencing problems with the remote start in the Pacifica, Dodge Durango and Sebring, according to the Car Complaints website. Since remote starts have been introduced into the Chrysler line of vehicles problems have occurred and most of those problems are discussed in the owners manual that comes with the automobile. A Chrysler owner must look at this manual before taking it to the dealership because the problem may be something simple.

Remote Start in Cold Weather

    Most Chrysler owners find problems with the remote starts in cold weather, according to Car Complaints. The remote start makes the vehicle honk the horn twice notifying the owner that the automobile is going to start-up. Many times in cold weather environments, the Chrysler owners only get one honk of the vehicle without the car starting and complain about this reoccurring problem. Chrysler notifies owners that the remote start does not work if the voltage is low in the car battery. When the weather is cold the battery on every automobile reduces the longer the car sits without being started and the alternator recharging the battery to its typical voltage.

Key Starting the Chrysler

    A Chrysler needs to be started with the key periodically as part of the safety feature of the remote start mechanism. The manufacturer's owner manual explains that the remote start will not work until the car is started with the key every once in a while. This feature was built into the remote start mechanism to ensure that the automobile owner is the one who is utilizing the remote start on the Chrysler.

Battery

    The remote start mechanism has a battery inside the handheld device that needs to be replaced periodically. When the Chrysler owner pushes the remote start button and does not even get one honk of the car horn, they should try the other buttons on the handheld device to see if the car unlocks remotely or the remote trunk button works. If none of the remotes work, then the battery may be to blame and should be replaced.

Programming

    Many times the remote start needs to be reprogrammed because the Chrysler owner dropped the handheld device. This can only be done by the dealership, but the automobile still operates with the use of the keys. If a Chrysler owner finds that they have to stand closer to the vehicle for the remote start to work or they have to point the remote start directly at the automobile to ensure that the device is working, then there may be a problem with the signal. The receiver located on the vehicle is the most likely culprit of this remote start problem. If the signal is the remote starting problem, the Chrysler needs to be taken to the dealership.

Signs & Symptoms of Improper Fuel Injector Lag

Signs & Symptoms of Improper Fuel Injector Lag

The fuel injector is the part in your engine that mixes air and gasoline and sprays this mixture into the engine's pistons. The fuel injector has small holes that can clog and cause your car a variety of issues that, if you notice them early, can save you a considerable amount of money in auto repair.

Weak Engine

    A clogged fuel injector will cause a lag in fuel injection where not enough fuel will reach the engine, causing a loss in engine power. The decrease in gasoline inside the pistons translates to less power, because with less gas to burn there is less heat and pressure created to move the pistons and consequently move the car.

Engine Misfires

    An engine misfire sounds like a gunshot just went off inside of your engine. Your car's internal computer carefully coordinates the movement of the pistons in your car. The computer uses expected levels of fuel to estimate how much power each piston will be creating. It then adjusts how much fuel to put into each piston to make the engine run smoothly and efficiently based on these estimates. However, when a clogged fuel injector injects too little fuel into one of the pistons, its power can differ significantly from the computer's projections and cause an engine misfire.

Uneven Idle

    Your car is idle when the engine is on but your car is in park. A clogged fuel injector can cause the spray of fuel to be erratic as well as slow, and when your car is idle your engine's revolutions per minute (RPMs) may begin dipping and coming back up because of the clog.

Engine Shake

    When your fuel injector is clogged and spraying erratically into a piston in your engine, there is a difference in power output between that piston and the rest of the engine. Instead of causing a misfire, this power difference can instead lead to your engine or entire car shaking quite vigorously while you are driving or idle.

How to Troubleshoot Solenoids

How to Troubleshoot Solenoids

Troubleshooting single and dual coil solenoids requires a systematic approach, whether you pull the solenoid out for bench testing or test it while installed. The most common solenoid "pulls" the energized plunger in toward the solenoid and can be switched on internally or externally. Push solenoids push the plunger out and can only be externally switched. The most common solenoid is used within your starter. It is an "energized-to-run" application, meaning when you turn your ignition key to on, the solenoid energizes to turn on your starter, which in turn, starts your engine.

Instructions

    1

    Analyze the symptoms of the problem. Determine whether your car houses a single or dual coil solenoid.

    2

    Visually scan the solenoid and its immediate setup. Broken parts, like a torn rubber boot, can allow dirt to coat the plunger, decreasing its efficiency by increasing friction and drag.

    3

    Check for broken wires, blown fuses, loose connections, pungent odors and misaligned mounting. Your solenoid may be burned out. Misalignments reduce your solenoid's energy to force ratio.

    4

    Check the voltage. Disconnect solenoid, apply power. If the solenoid doesn't pull in, check to see if there is enough voltage getting to the system. Readings should be a minimum 10 Vdc on a 12 Vdc system and 20 on a 24 system. If the readings are unacceptable, the battery may need to be replaced. If readings are good, but the solenoid doesn't pull in, then bench test it.

    5

    Check to see if the solenoid is wired to the starter's "S" terminal directly or by relay. If it is, the pull coil is incorrectly wired and may negate your manufacturer's warranty. Check your manufacturer's manual for any specific testing to check the connection.

    6

    Measure coil resistance using an ohmmeter. The solenoid must be at room temperature (70 degrees Fahrenheit/21 degrees Celsius) before checking. Refer to your manual for your specific wire color schematic and coil resistance value chart.

    7

    Check the linkage setting. The linkage connects the plunger to the engine control lever. If misaligned, the linkage will not allow the solenoid's plunger to bottom out, causing unresponsiveness.

How to Troubleshoot an Automatic Transmission and Torque Converter

How to Troubleshoot an Automatic Transmission and Torque Converter

The transmission and torque converter work as a unit to transfer engine combustion energy to the rear wheels. The transmission transfers this energy through a series of graduated gears that start with lower gears and end up with higher gear ratios. A separate reverse gear allows for reverse travel. The torque converter serves as a fluid coupling device between the engine and transmission, allowing a gradual, smooth force of energy, rather than a sudden shock of pressure to the transmission. Both can have their problems; and if you know what to look for, you can avoid costly repairs.

Instructions

Transmission Diagnoses

    1

    Look for a "check engine" light. If you see one of these, the vehicle will have to be plugged into a code scanner to obtain the exact trouble code. It could reveal that you have a transmission-related problem. Cars equipped with a separate transmission overdrive light will instantly direct you to the culprit.

    2

    Use a code scanner to check for all solenoid and sensor readings. Electronic transmissions use speed sensors to send commands for shifting. If they fail or short out, shift patterns can change or leave the transmission in second or third gear as a default setting.

    3

    Drive the vehicle using a slow, gradual acceleration. Feel and listen for each individual automatic shift. By the time the vehicle has reached 40 to 50 MPH, the transmission should have reached its top gear without rough shifting or skipping any gears.

    4

    Look for any type of transmission fluid leaks in or around the transmission. Check the filler tube base for a seal leak. Check the transmission tail shaft for any seepage and the front of the bell housing that contains the transmission input shaft seals. Any standing fluid on the floor, when the vehicle has sat overnight, can indicate a worn seal or gasket. The transmission pan housing bolts should all be present and tight.

    5

    Check the transmission fluid level on the dipstick with a running, warm engine. The level should be topped off at the "Hot" indicator line. If it reads below this line or cannot be seen on the stick, it means additional fluid must be added. Low transmission fluid levels can cause slippage in gear, or the vehicle may not move when put in gear. High-speed slippage occurs when you suddenly push the gas pedal and the vehicle fails to shift, and the engine RPM raises without the transmission engaging.

    6

    Examine the transmission fluid. Any fluid that looks muddy, frothy or discolored means that it has become contaminated, and the transmission pump will not function normally. Old fluid or fluid that has become a dirty brown color with a burnt smell to it indicates contaminated fluid.

Torque Converter Diagnoses

    7

    Listen for the vehicle making any noise while in gear. If the noise disappears after placing the gear selector in neutral, the torque converter needle bearings may be worn, causing excessive movement and misalignment in the parts. The needle bearings separate three major torque converter components; once they have worn, this affects all operational modes of the torque converter.

    8

    Shift the vehicle in drive, neutral and then in reverse and listen for any loud clanking or clunking noises. These sounds usually indicate a bad torque converter. This generally occurs when the fluid clutches have become worn or damaged, or indicates a broken mounting bolt or misalignment or a broken mount between the torque converter and the flywheel.

    9

    Drive the vehicle and come to a gradual stop, noting any shuddering or stalling. This may point to a bad lockup solenoid, a shorted solenoid or a sticking lockup valve. Lockup shudder can also cause the vehicle to vibrate unnecessarily and indicates a torque converter part that has bent under extreme load or force. Howling or whining noises make come from a defective torque converter or transmission.

    10

    Look for any leaking transmission fluid at the drainage hole in the bottom of the bell housing. Cracked torque converters will lose fluid and leak from a small drain inspection hole in this area and might have a burnt smell or dirty brown color.

Jumat, 17 Desember 2010

Trooper Transmission Problems

Isuzu has not produced the Trooper since 2002, and the manufacturer has made only a few recalls on this automobile. Several Trooper owners have complained about transmission problems, according to Edmunds. These transmission complaints deal with everything from complete transmission failure to a more minor problem with the transmission fluid.

Transmission Slipping

    Edmunds reports that some Trooper owners have had problems with the transmission slipping. Though Isuzu has not issued a recall for this problem as of 2010, Edmunds attributes the slipping to the transmission bands wearing inside the Trooper. The transmission bands sit on the inside of the transmission; each gear has a band that holds it in place as the driver shifts into another gear. Worn bands can cause the Trooper's transmission to slip.

Low Transmission Fluid

    Many transmission problems in the Isuzu Trooper are attributed to low transmission fluid, with reports indicating that a leaky valve could be the problem. A Trooper can slip gears, jerk when gears are shifted or not let the Isuzu move at all. The Trooper owner needs to check the transmission fluid level. The transmission fluid level dipstick, with lines indicating level, is located under the hood. These lines show whether the transmission fluid level is low or at an acceptable level. The Isuzu owner must add transmission fluid when the level falls below the top line of the dipstick, but he is warned against adding fluid in excess of the top line.

Transmission Failure

    Isuzu Trooper owners have complained about transmission failure attributable to overheating of the unit due to its being operated with a clogged transmission filter. The transmission filter collects most of the debris made by wear of the gears. Once the filter becomes clogged with transmission debris, it does not allow the flow of clean transmission fluid inside the gears. The gears begin to create more friction causing the transmission to run hotter. The Trooper owner can see this overheating development on the dipstick of the transmission fluid, as the fluid will smell burned, or small particles will be visible in the fluid.

Kamis, 16 Desember 2010

How to Compare OBD Scanners

How to Compare OBD Scanners

There are a variety of on-board diagnostic (OBD) scanners for use. Which to buy depends on the model and year of vehicle it will be used on, as well as the type of diagnostic functions needed.

OBD History

    The Unites States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) required OBD to become standardized in 1996. Vehicles 1995 and earlier use use diagnostic systems unique to their manufacturer. For example, diagnostic procedures for a 1990 Ford and a 1990 Chevy Blazer are not the same. Vehicles after 1996 use the same process and system of codes.

OBD-I Only Scanners

    Vehicles predating 1996 can be placed into self-testing mode. Trouble codes are conveyed by a flashing check engine light. There are scanners available for these vehicles, but each vehicle needs its own dedicated scanner. The question here is whether or not it is worth buying a scanner at all, due to their limited use and functionality.

OBD-II Only Scanners

    Most OBD-II scanners are not reverse compatible. They will not be able to read code from vehicles predating 1996. They can be widely used on makes and models after 1996, however. When comparing scanners, a potential buyer needs to assess how much they will use it. Scanners can be simple code readers, good for only retrieving active codes from the OBD-II system. More expensive scanners record and display live data from a vehicle's array of sensors.

Multi-Functioning Devices

    As technology becomes more advanced and sophisticated, OBD scanners become more complicated. Some scanners can be programmed to interact with other diagnostic systems, like anti-lock braking systems brakes. There are also other devices called micro-tuners. Not only can these read code and monitor sensor data, but they can be used to reprogram your vehicle's powertrain control module.

Comparison Shopping

    Make a list of everything needed. Consider the following questions: How many cars will it be used on? Will it be used for more than just OBD coding? Will it be needed to monitor sensors? This list can be used as a reference point while shopping online or in an auto parts store.

Rabu, 15 Desember 2010

What Causes Gas Filled Spark Plugs?

What Causes Gas Filled Spark Plugs?

A spark plug is an electrical device that provides, as the name suggests, the sparks needed to ignite the gasoline in an engine, which in turn powers the vehicle. However, while the spark plugs typically are designed to be kept dry so they can continue consistently producing sparks, they can get soaked with gasoline. The culprit for gas-soaked spark plugs is a flooded engine.

Flooded Engine

    A flooded engine is most typically caused by the driver excessively pressing on the gas before turning the ignition in the car. As a result, too much gasoline enters the car's carburetor without being ignited and burned. Then, when the spark plug enters the carburetor to provide the spark that will ignite the mixture of gasoline and air, it can dip into the excessively high level of gasoline.

The Problem

    If a spark plug gets gasoline in it, the significant problem is that the moisture created by the gasoline makes it impossible for the spark plug to generate sparks. As a result, the next time the spark plug enters a carburetor to ignite the gas, no spark is made, so there is nothing there to ignite the gas. The gasoline-and-air mixture will simply remain that, and the lack of ignition will deprive the car of any power to drive it.

The Fix

    How to fix a spark plug that has been soaked in gasoline depends on the severity of the problem. If the plug was only soaked in a small amount of gasoline, it may be possible to simply leave the car alone for a period of time, allowing the gasoline to evaporate off the plug and for the plug to dry. Then the spark plug should be able to generate sparks again, returning to working order. Prolonged soaking of a spark plug can require more extensive repair, however. Wiping a soaked plug clean with a dry rag, and then leaving it out in the air to dry could repair the problem. But in extreme circumstances, the plug may need to be replaced.

Car Generator Problems

Car Generator Problems

Cars don't just need gasoline for energy. They also need electricity. The generator that produces a cars electricity is called an alternator. It also recharges the car's battery. The spinning of the alternator that produces electricity is driven by the car's engine. Many factors can effect the performance of this generator.

Effects

    A drained battery can often be a sign of a malfunctioning alternator. Blown bulbs and battery damage can also indicate alternator problems. Dim lights and other electrical components operating improperly can also be symptoms of a faulty alternator.

Causes

    A slipping drive belt can cause an alternator to undercharge the battery. Worn brushes and other internal components can hinder an alternator's performance. An alternator can also overcharge a car's battery. This could be due to a faulty voltage regulator, which is sometimes contained within the alternator, but can be a separate component.

Solution

    The easiest solution is to replace an alternator. They are only attached by one or two bolts. Confident mechanics can also choose to rebuild an alternator. But no matter what solution a car owner chooses, he should test the alternator's output first.

Why Does My 2002 Oldsmobile Alero Engine Die When I Am at a Stop?

The 2002 Oldsmobile Alero comes fitted with a 2.2-liter, four-cylinder engine standard, and had an option of changing that to a 3.4-liter V-6. Both engines are fueled through sequential electronic fuel injection. When there is a problem in this system, the engine will die at a stop.

Fuel Pressure

    The fuel pressure is delivered by the fuel pump, and regulated by the fuel pressure regulator. On the 2002 Alero, the fuel pump is in the fuel tank, and the regulator is between the fuel rail and the intake manifold, on top of the engine. The 2.2-liter engine requires 50 to 60 psi of fuel pressure to run properly, while the 3.4-liter engine needs 41 to 47 psi.

Fuel Injectors

    The 2.2-liter engine has four fuel injectors and the 3.4-liter engine has six injectors. These injectors must properly deliver fuel to the cylinder for the engine to run properly. If an injector becomes partially clogged, the engine will be starved for fuel, and may die at a stop.

Idle Air Control

    The idle air control valve and motor are attached to the throttle body, and regulate how much air enters the combustion chamber. This component also regulates the idle speed, and failure will cause the engine to die when idling at a stop.

Selasa, 14 Desember 2010

The Effects of a Bad Distributor

The Effects of a Bad Distributor

Distributors are an essential ignition system component, as they direct the spark to the spark plug wires and ultimately the spark plugs, which initiate combustion. When distributors go bad, the engine is plagued by a number of performance issues. Beginning in the 1970s, distributors were improved, from the old point system, to the electronic models of today.

Engine Starting

    Bad distributors commonly cause engine starting problems. Dirty, corroded, or worn distributor caps and rotors prevent the spark from reaching the spark plugs, and cause firing issues that prevent the car from starting. Moisture may build up in distributor with a damaged or cracked cap, also preventing the engine from starting. In this case, thoroughly drying the inside of the distributor allows the engine to start, but this is only a temporary fix until the distributor cap is replaced.

Engine Timing

    As the distributor sends the spark to the spark plugs, it does so in proper time. Timing issues are commonly caused by a distributor that is faulty or set incorrectly. By adjusting the distributor, engines are timed to their proper settings. A bad distributor may send the spark at irregular intervals, especially if the rotor is not spinning properly, or if the rotor and distributor cap are dirty and corroded. Effects of improper timing include both rough, shaky idling and misfires.

Poor Gas Mileage

    Bad distributors are directly related to poor gas mileage. If the spark is not timed correctly, or is weak, it translates to poor combustion in the cylinders. Incorrect spark timing causes cylinders to misfire, and not run properly, while a weak spark does not ignite all of the fuel in the combustion chamber, causing fuel to be wasted and poor miles-per-gallon numbers.

Other Issues

    Problems originating from a bad distributor create a domino effect, affecting the engine's performance. Improper timing and poor spark caused by a bad distributor affect engine power and throttle response. An engine not properly igniting the fuel in the combustion chamber is doomed to have decreased horsepower problems and frequent stalling issues.

Senin, 13 Desember 2010

Chevy Malibu Troubleshooting

Chevy Malibu Troubleshooting

A lot can go wrong with a Chevy Malibu, due to just normal wear and tear. Checking the entire vehicle by hand can be time consuming, especially if you do not know the exact problem. There is a way to speed up the process. The Chevy Malibu is equipped with a number of diagnostic computers and sensors. These systems can provide you with a list of all the problems that have recently developed. Accessing each of these systems requires the same procedure.

Instructions

    1

    Open the Chevy Malibu's driver's-side door. Take a seat behind the steering wheel and insert your key into the ignition. Start the engine. The dashboard will light up. Let the lights settle, but take notes on which warning indicating lights remain active. For example, an active "service engine soon" light means you will have to access the car's On-Board Diagnostic system. An active ABS light means you will have to check the antilock braking system.

    2

    Turn the engine and electrical system off. Leave the key in the ignition.

    3

    Find the Malibu's Data Link Connector. The DLC can be found beneath the dashboard and to the left of the steering column. No matter the system and scanner you select, the DLC is the gateway to be used. For example, OBD-II, ABS and Tire Pressure Monitoring System scanners all go through the DLC.

    4

    Attach your diagnostic scanner to the Malibu's DLC port. All scanners use a diagnostic scanner that ends in a 16-pin plug. Insert this plug into the DLC.

    5

    Switch the scanner on. Turn the key in the Malibu's ignition and bring up the car's electrical system. Some types of diagnostic hardware will also need an active engine. If you are using such a device, start the Malibu's engine.

    6

    Enter a "read" or "retrieve" command into your device. How to do this not only differs by the brand of device you use, but the system the device is intended for. Follow the exact instructions offered in your manual.

    7

    Give your device a second to interface with its intended diagnostic system. Once trouble or fault codes are displayed on your device's screen, copy them onto a separate sheet of paper.

    8

    Look up the coding definitions for each of the codes you copied. Some codes can be looked up on the manual sold with your diagnostic hardware. This information may not be complete, however. An OBD-II scanner's manual, for example, only contains basic, standard OBD-II trouble codes. General Motors has a separate set of codes. Most diagnostic codes can be easily found online.

    9

    Investigate the components specified by the codes on your list. For example, if you have OBD-II codes that indicate trouble with a specific ignition cylinder, check all of the cylinders. If you find a problem with one tire sensor, check the others as well.

    10

    Keep the problem list. Should you need to involve a mechanic, this list will defray any diagnostic fees.

Minggu, 12 Desember 2010

Intrepid Car Problems

It is important to keep your Dodge Intrepid well maintained. Common automotive concerns involve engine, steering and suspension and electrical problems, which are made up of various components that can become defective and would need replacing.

Engine-Related Problems

    Symptoms that can lead to engine problems vary. Some of which include stalling, no-start, lack of power, backfiring or noise during acceleration. Unless it is a problem, such as low compression (inside the engine), many engine-related problems can be remedied by inspecting and/or replacing components in the places, like the fuel system and ignition system.

Steering and Suspension Problems

    You would know if your Intrepid is experiencing faults in its steering and suspension because you would be able to feel them. Symptoms include wander or pull (improper steering stability), bottoming the car, vibrating, and tire wear. Inspecting or replacing your Intrepid's tires, brakes, steering linkage, shock absorbers and ball joints would be ideal to lessen these problems.

Electrical Problems

    One main cause for problems in your Intrepid's electrical system would be a faulty charging system, namely the alternator. A low or dead battery would be obvious: no power at all. Signs for a fault in the electrical system include lack of power while driving and the battery doesn't remain charged.

Sabtu, 11 Desember 2010

How to Troubleshoot Low Oil Pressure in a Chevy 305

How to Troubleshoot Low Oil Pressure in a Chevy 305

The oil system is a crucial component of any engine, including the Chevrolet 305 CI engine. A lack of (indicated) oil pressure can be caused by several things---from a simple faulty oil pressure sending unit to failed main or rod bearings.

Low/No Pressure Indication

    Do not operate the engine without verifying the cause for the warning: it may be a simple problem or it may be something severe. Engines with high mileage are prone to reduced oil pressure from normal wear of internal components. However, if the engine has begun making unusual noises (clattering, ticking or knocking sounds), it is a situation that needs immediate attention.

Isolating Instrument Problems

    First, check for the correct oil level. If the engine appears to be operating normally without unusual noises, the instrumentation may be faulty. A sending unit (a "sensor" near the oil filter) sends an electrical signal to the gauge or warning light. With the key on/engine off, disconnect the wire to the sending unit (located near the oil filter) and observe the gauge---it should stay at zero. If good, the gauge can be isolated. Next, test the gauge (again, key on/engine off) by grounding the wire end to any metal part of the car. If good, it should read zero pressure when grounded.

Mechanical Diagnosis

    If the sensor/gauge is working properly, a mechanical gauge should be installed in place of the electrical sensor to accurately determine the exact oil pressure. If readings are low, the problem may be a plugged or restricted oil filter---replace the filter and verify. If the low pressure accompanies abnormal engine noises, the likely cause is lack of oil, increased bearing clearances, faulty oil pump, damaged bearings or a restriction of oil flow back to the sump/oil pan.

How to Troubleshoot a 2001 Dodge Truck Transmission

How to Troubleshoot a 2001 Dodge Truck Transmission

Transmission issues can be quite alarming because transmission repairs can be very costly. You can save money by troubleshooting your 2001 Dodge truck transmission at home before taking it in for a costly repair. There are some reasons why your transmission might be acting up. Many times the fix is as simple as adding transmission fluid. Be prepared to spend about an hour troubleshooting your transmission.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the ground where your truck is parked overnight. You want to see if there are any leaks. If you see a spot on the ground, dip your finger in it and look at the color. If the color of the fluid is red, then you know that you have a transmission fluid leak.

    2

    Drive your truck for five miles to get the transmission hot.

    3

    Lift the hood of your Dodge truck and locate the transmission dipstick, located on the driver's side of the engine towards the firewall and labeled with the word "transmission."

    4

    Pull the transmission dipstick out while the truck is running. Smell the transmission fluid. If the fluid smells burnt, you could have internal issues. Wipe off the dipstick with the rag and reinsert it into the dipstick tube. Pull out the dipstick again and read the level of fluid on it. You will see a line on the dipstick for "add" and one line for "full hot." If the fluid is low, this could be the reason for your transmission issues.

    5

    Park your Dodge truck and let it cool down. Slide under the vehicle on a creeper. The creeper allows you to lie on your back and roll around under the truck.

    6

    Shine the flashlight all around the transmission. The transmission is attached behind the engine. You are looking for any wires that have come loose around the transmission. It is possible that a connection has worked its way loose, causing your transmission issues.

    7

    Look at the linkage on the side of your transmission with the flashlight. The linkage is used to connect the transmission to the shifter to change gears from park, drive, reverse, etc. Sometimes this linkage can come loose and cause issues with the transmission.

Kamis, 09 Desember 2010

How to Troubleshoot a General Motors Trunk Lock

How to Troubleshoot a General Motors Trunk Lock

General Motors sells sedans with trunks under the Chevrolet, Buick, Pontiac, Cadillac and Oldsmobile brands. Features of the trunk locks include remote trunk releases, a trunk release lockout option, optional trunk release handles and a trap-resistant trunk kit. Problems with the trunk lock systems can include the lock elements malfunctioning. Problems like these can be corrected through troubleshooting.

Instructions

    1

    Change the battery on the remote keyless entry transmitter if the trunk won't unlock. You can test whether the problem is with the transmitter or not by seeing if it opens or locks the doors when you press the button. Open the transmitter and remove the old battery if you suspect it's dead. Replace it with a new one.

    2

    Switch the remote trunk release lockout to the "Off" position, if you try to unlock the trunk from the remote trunk release switch on the driver's door and it won't open the trunk. The lockout is designed to immobilize the remote operation and force the trunk to be unlocked with the key at the trunk itself. Look under the trunk lid and see if there's a lockout switch there. It will be marked and located at the latch. Move the switch to the "Off" position if it's installed.

    3

    Turn the ignition off, or engage the parking brake, if the remote trunk release still won't unlock the trunk.

    4

    Fully close the trunk from the center if the trunk won't latch. Be sure it latches before trying to lock it.