Minggu, 28 Februari 2010

Transmission Problems in a 1992 3000GT

Mitsubishi has published technical service bulletins (TSBs) concerning transmission problems with its 1992 3000GT. The transmission problems have caused the jerking during shifting; transmission linkage failure, delay or hesitation when shifting gears; or complete transmission failure. None of these transmission problems have led to any recalls from the manufacturer.

Transmission Linkage Problems

    The transmission linkage enables you to switch gears in the transmission of your 3000GT. Linkage failure causes the Mitsubishi to jerk during shifting or lose gears completely. Once this linkage problem occurs, you must take your Mitsubishi to a qualified technician to prevent further damage to the transmission.

Delayed Shifting

    Some owners of the 1992 3000GT have reported delayed shifting between second and third gear, as well as third and fourth gear. The transmission in the Mitsubishi will begin to lose power and hesitate before catching the next gear. No specific cause has been attributed to this delayed shifting problem, but according to the TSB, it may require an adjustment in the automatic transmission clutch end.

Manual Transmission Difficult to Shift

    The manual transmission in the 1992 3000GT has been the subject of reports about the gears becoming difficult to shift. You may have to jerk the manual gear shift or push it harshly in order for the gears in the transmission to shift. This transmission problem creates an accident hazard by slowing down or stalling the Mitsubishi during normal driving conditions.

Drive Train Failure

    The 1992 Mitsubishi can have transmission problems on the all-wheel drive 3000GT because of mismatched tires. The mismatched tires cause the front and back drive train of the transmission to fight against each other. This fighting of the front and back tires causes the transmission to bind, eventually causing the transmission to fail.

Sabtu, 27 Februari 2010

C3 Corvette Headlight Problems

C3 Corvette Headlight Problems

The Corvette C3 series is a sports car produced by the Chevrolet division of General Motors. The C3 was produced from 1968 through 1982 and is known among Corvette enthusiasts as "The Shark." GM installed vacuum-activated, pop-up headlights that were prone to wear out and leave the headlights stuck either open or shut.

General Problems

    The vacuum system was both vulnerable and complicated. Over time, the rubber hoses and other components of the vacuum system wear out, resulting in lost vacuum pressure in the headlight actuators, which open and close the headlamp doors. Oftentimes, only one headlight would operate, giving the impression that the Corvette was "winking." The owner either has to pry the headlight open or force it to shut.

Repairing

    To test whether or not the vacuum has failed or has a leak (with the headlamps in the open and locked position), disconnect the large green hose and attach the vacuum pump. If vacuum pressure holds, the internal diaphragm and rear sealing grommet are both good. If the vacuum pressure drops, replace the grommet. Rubber kits to rebuild the actuators are available at Corvette parts stores. With headlamps in the closed position, disconnect the large red hose and attach the vacuum pump. If the vacuum pressure holds, the internal diaphragm is good. If the vacuum pressure drops, the internal diaphragm is leaking and the actuator must be replaced.

Replacement

    Due to the headaches resulting from fixing a worn out vacuum system, many Corvette C3 owners decide to replace the pop-up head lights with fixed, recessed ones. Simple conversion kits are sold at car expos and Corvette supply catalogs.

How to Know if the Mass Air Flow Sensor on Your 2007 Nissan Maxima Is Bad

How to Know if the Mass Air Flow Sensor on Your 2007 Nissan Maxima Is Bad

The name Maxima dates back to the old Datsun days, where in 1981, the top trim level of the Datsun 810 was the Maxima. The 2007 Maxima, which was three years removed from the seventh generational change of the Maxima, came standard with a 255-horsepower, 3.5-liter V-6 engine. A mass airflow sensor used a heated wire to measure the density and amount of air entering the engine, and the engine control module adjusted the fuel to compensate for the air. When your 2007 Maxima shows the symptoms of a failed MAF sensor, you have to make certain that the MAF failed prior to replacing it or you could be out a lot of money and still have a vehicle that doesnt run correctly.

Instructions

    1

    Trace the air filter outlet tube, the tube connecting the air filter box to the engine, until you find the hard tube with a wiring harness plugged into it. This is the mass airflow sensor.

    2

    Unplug the wiring harness from the MAF sensor and hold the sensor so the prongs are facing you and the locking clip is facing upward. Turn the ignition to the Run position and probe the second pin from the left on the wiring harness with the positive probe on the voltmeter. Touch the black probe to the negative terminal of the battery. Check for a voltage reading of at least 10.5 volts. If your reading is less than 10.5 volts, repair the short in the electrical system and repeat this step.

    3

    Plug the wiring harness back into the MAF sensor.

    4

    Connect a piecing attachment to the positive voltmeter probe and pierce the green wire with an orange stripe. Touch the black probe to the negative battery terminal. If the MAF sensor operates correctly, the voltmeter will read 0.4 volts. If the MAF has an incorrect reading, replace it with a new one. If the reading is correct, proceed to the next step.

    5

    Start the engine and allow it to reach operating temperature, roughly halfway up the temperature gauge. Probe the same green wire with the orange stripe with the positive voltmeter probe and touch the negative voltmeter probe to the negative battery terminal. If operating correctly, the voltage reading will show as 1.0 to 1.2 volts. If it is out of specification, the MAF sensor is bad and you must replace or clean it. If the MAF sensor is within specification, proceed to the next step.

    6

    Instruct an assistant to increase the engine speed to 2,500 rpm. Read the voltmeters output. If the MAF is operating correctly, the voltmeter will read 1.6 to 2.0 volts. If the MAF sensors voltage is out of spec, replace it or clean it. If it is within specification, proceed to the following step.

    7

    Tell your assistant to allow the vehicle to idle, then slowly increase the engine speed from idle to 4,000 rpm. If operating correctly. The voltage will slowly and smoothly increase from 1.0 to 1.2 volts at idle to about 2.4 volts at 4,000 rpm. If the voltage jumps up and down while increasing speed of does not meet the specifications, you must clean or replace the MAF sensor. If the MAF sensor is within specifications and you are still experiencing drivability issues, you have a problem other than the MAF sensor, such as bad ground, fail engine control module or other failed sensors.

What Happens When You Drive on Bad Bearings?

What Happens When You Drive on Bad Bearings?

If you drive your vehicle for 100,000 miles or more, its wheel bearings may deteriorate. Faulty wheel bearings can cause safety hazards and further wear and tear on your vehicles' frame. To avoid costly repairs and irreversible damage, replace bad bearings as soon as you notice any signs of deterioration.

Symptoms

    Several symptoms indicate bad wheel bearings on a vehicle. The most common sign is noises that occurs while you are driving. You may hear a squeaking, chirping or grinding noise coming from the wheels. These sounds usually happen when you make a sharp turn or increase speed. Also, you will often notice that the steering wheel veers to one side or moves uncontrollably when you press the brakes.

Hazards

    If you continue driving a vehicle with bad bearings, the symptoms will worsen and safety risks increase. The steering wheel may become harder to control. If this happens, navigating and steering the car will be difficult. A wheel may become loose and move around in the wheel arch, causing damage to hub and brakes. If the wheel remains unstable, it may eventually detach from the vehicle while you are driving.

ABS Issues

    Wheel bearings contain sensors that send a signal to the anti-lock braking system (ABS) when the tires spin or skid. Continuing to drive a vehicle with bad bearings can cause its ABS system to fail. When bearings are faulty, the ABS signal light usually appears on the dash indicating the disablement of the ABS system. This generally does not cause any interruptions in regular braking; however, it will suspend the ABS system's aid in emergency situations or while braking on wet or slippery surfaces.

Prevention

    It's impossible to determine how many miles a vehicle can go before faulty bearings fail completely. Consequently, you should never ignore the first signs of bearing problems. Monitor the bearings once your vehicle reaches the mile expectancy limit for replacing them, and have a mechanic check them regularly. This will help you determine their condition and prepare for replacement within a reasonable time frame. Although the average life expectancy of wheel bearings is 100,000 miles, they can last up to 150,000 miles or more depending on driving habits.

Troubleshooting Engine Problems on a Chevy Monte Carlo

Troubleshooting Engine Problems on a Chevy Monte Carlo

Your Chevrolet Monte Carlo may be experiencing engine problems, such as stalling, misfiring, knocking or poor acceleration. Troubleshooting the Monte Carlo's engine can mean searching under the hood, but for every symptom, there can be a couple of causes, and some parts of the engine can be hard to access. The Monte Carlo has an On-Board Diagnostic system. Using it can significantly cut down on the time spent troubleshooting the problem. However, how you use the OBD system depends on when your Monte Carlo was manufactured.

Instructions

1996 and After

    1

    Open the driver's side door and locate the Monte Carlo's Data Link Connection. The DLC is the gateway to all of the Monte Carlo' s diagnostic system. It will either be black or gray in color and has 16 receiving slots. It will be in the general vicinity of the left kick panel beneath the dash.

    2

    Hook an OBD-II scanner into the DLC. Turn the scanner on if the model you have does not come on automatically.

    3

    Insert your key into the Monte Carlo's ignition and turn it to the "Accessories" position. Some scanners may require that the engine is cranked. If you own one of these scanners, crank the engine.

    4

    Press the appropriate button to retrieve the OBD-II codes. You will have to do this if your brand of scanner does not automatically scan the system upon sensing a connection with the Monte Carlo's computer.

    5

    Consult the scanner's manual for OBD-II coding and code definitions. It will likely contain the generic OBD-II codes universal to all post-1996 vehicles. General Motors has supplemental codes, which you will need to look up online. Your Monte Carlo's manual will not have these codes.

    6

    Make a list of the codes and prioritize them. All trouble codes should be investigated first. These have occurred more frequently, causing the "Check Engine" light on the Monte Carlo's dash to illuminate. Next, write down all of the pending codes. These are problems that have occurred but not with the frequency of trouble codes. These codes could be trending toward trouble status.

    7

    Turn off the Monte Carlo and remove the key from the ignition. Unplug the scanner from the DLC outlet. Open the engine compartment, and use your list of codes and definitions for further troubleshooting.

1984 Through 1995

    8

    Locate the Assembly Line Diagnostic Link. The ALDL is a 12-slot outlet located beneath the steering column.

    9

    Bend a paperclip into a "U." Locate two slots at the end of the ALDL's top row of slots. These are next to each other to the far right. Insert the ends of the "U" into the two slots.

    10

    Insert your key into the Monte Carlo's ignition and turn it on but do not crank the engine.

    11

    Count how many times the "Check Engine" light flashes. General Motors' flash codes are two-digit numbers. The first number will be a long flash, and the second will be a short flash. There will be a pause between the end of a code and the beginning of another. Code 12 will appear at the beginning of the flashing sequence. Ignore this as this is common and does not correspond with an engine problem.

    12

    Write the code numbers down. Consult an online list of GM flash codes for definitions. Turn the Monte Carlo off. Open the engine compartment and use the list to focus your investigation.

How to Troubleshoot a Mazda MX-3

Mazda began manufacturing automobiles in 1920 in Japan and has developed a variety of different cars and trucks since that time including the MX-3. The MX-3 is comprised of a variety of parts and components. The complex makeup of the car can make it difficult to properly troubleshoot a problem you are having with your MX-3. One method to find what parts need to be replaced for a particular problem is by listening for sounds the MX-3 makes and where those sounds are coming from.

Instructions

    1

    Inspect the MX-3's battery when you hear a loud click from the engine as you start the car. The battery may be discharged or faulty. Look also at the starter motor to see if it is still working and, if you have an automatic transmission, find the flywheel to see if it is faulty. If you hear the loud click noise coming from the front wheels while you are backing the car out, look at the CV half-shaft to see if the JV joint is dry, damaged or worn.

    2

    Find the differential drive pinion when you hear a grinding sound from the rear axle area of your MX-3. Look at the pinion teeth to determine if any of them are worn, damaged or broken. You should also check the U joint for wear or damage as well.

    3

    Check the wheel nut and brake caliper when you hear a scraping noise from your tires as you drive. The wheel nut may be loose, worn or damaged and the brake caliper may have become stuck and is causing brake drag.

    4

    Examine the exhaust system of your MX-3 when it rattles underneath the passenger compartment while you accelerate the car. Check for leaks among the exhaust system components and look at whether the muffler is burned out or damaged. The serpentine hanger system may also be loose or the solenoid heat shield may be damaged.

    5

    Look at the pinion bearing if your hear a growling-type noise underneath the vehicle as you drive. The pinion bearings may have become worn or damaged. If the growling noise comes from the engine area while you turn your steering wheel check the power steering pump and power steering hose to see if these parts are leaking or damaged.

Jumat, 26 Februari 2010

Problems With the EGR Ford Powerstroke

Problems With the EGR Ford Powerstroke

The Powerstroke diesel engine is installed in Ford's heavy-duty lineup of trucks. The Powerstroke's exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system does have issues reported by many owners. The EGR system recirculates the truck's exhaust back into the engine cylinders, reducing vehicle emissions.

Clogged EGR Cooler

    The EGR on the Ford Powerstroke is prone to clogging because of debris buildup that can cause the engine's temperature to rise as well as loss of coolant. Once the EGR cooler fails, the engine will overheat, creating multiple problems including increased emissions and decreased fuel economy. The EGR cooler needs to be cleaned or replaced on a regular basis as part of the Powerstroke's maintenance schedule. The EGR coolers installed on 2004 models fail at a higher rate because of a design flaw. EGRs installed after 2004 are longer and square, which creates a bigger surface for debris to build up, whereas the EGR coolers installed in models made before 2003 are round.

Clogged EGR Valve

    The Ford Powerstroke EGR valve can clog up due to the quality of fuel used in the vehicle and excessive idling. Debris builds up in the EGR valve because diesel fuel burns at a lower temperature, creating more debris than with gasoline. The soot produced from diesel fuel can clog up the EGR valve quickly. This EGR problem in the Ford Powerstroke, in turn, causes problems with the turbocharger, such as stalling or misfires. A higher quality diesel fuel, such as a cetane level of 45 or better, needs to be used in the Powerstroke, and the EGR valve needs to be cleaned regularly.

EGR Failure

    A common problem with the Ford Powerstroke EGR is complete failure caused by a vacuum leak. The EGR takes the exhaust fumes and sends them back into the engine, which decreases the chemicals released through the exhaust system. A vacuum leak will cause the EGR to work harder, overheating the device. Once the EGR is working above normal engine temperature, it will fail. The EGR will need to be replaced, but this does not fix the problem until the vacuum leak is found and repaired.

Transmission Sensor Symptoms

Newer model vehicles rely on a variety of sensors and electrical components to maintain proper operations and functions. If any of the sensors that control and regulate your vehicle's transmission begin to fail or stop working, your vehicle will not drive or shift properly and your transmission may even incur damage due to wear caused by improper operation.

Shifting Problems

    If the sensors are not reading correctly, the transmission may shift at the wrong time or may not shift at all. Several different sensors work together to tell your transmission when it should shift. The transmission takes readings from the vehicle's speed sensor to determine how fast the car is going and how hard the engine is working, and then determines what gear the transmission should be in to account for the speed and power.

Overheating

    Automatic transmissions have sensors in them that keep track of the transmission temperature and make adjustments accordingly, such as switching into overdrive to reduce strain. If the transmission is allowed to work too hard, it will overheat and can be seriously damaged. In newer vehicles, the transmission temperature sensor is also responsible for triggering error lights in the dashboard to alert drivers if the transmission is becoming to hot.

Failure to Operate

    In extreme cases of transmission sensor failure, the vehicle may become stuck in one gear and not receive any signals to shift at all. In some cases, the vehicle may get stuck in park or reverse. If the transmission will not shift at all, the car is not operational and you will not be able to drive it.

Kamis, 25 Februari 2010

How to Identify What Brand of Ignition Coil I Have

How to Identify What Brand of Ignition Coil I Have

Ignition coils are not created equal -- some are manufactured to higher specifications, some lower. Some coils will last the life of the vehicle, some will have to be replaced. Occasionally, in an ignition system with multiple coils, only one will fail and need to be replaced. If you want to match the replacement coil to the existing coils, it is important to know what kind of coils are already in the vehicle. Determining the brand of an ignition coil is not difficult and you can do it in no more than a few hours.

Instructions

Remove the Ignition Coil

    1

    Determine where your ignition coil is. On late-model cars, it is common to have multiple ignition coils positioned above the spark plugs. Your ignition coil may also be in-line from the battery (a medium sized, round cylinder), or in the distributor. If the coil is not on the spark plugs or located before the distributor, then it is located inside the distributor.

    2

    Disconnect the positive battery cable, and remove your ignition coil. The manufacturer's name may be printed directly on the coil.

    3

    Write down any numbers printed on the coil, if the manufacturer's name is not present. Take your coil in to a local auto parts store and ask to compare it to coils they have in stock for the vehicle. Otherwise, you can search the internet for ignition coils for your particular vehicle and match the coil you removed with photographs.

    4

    Call a local dealership that sells your make of vehicle. If you provide them with the vehicle identification number, or VIN, they may be able to tell you what kind of ignition coil was installed at the factory.

    5

    Call the manufacturer and provide them with the VIN. Manufacturers often outsource electrical components rather than producing the parts themselves.

Rabu, 24 Februari 2010

How to Read the Check Engine Code on a 2005 Ford Escape XLT

How to Read the Check Engine Code on a 2005 Ford Escape XLT

When your 2005 Ford Escape XLT's "Check Engine" light comes on, it means you car's computer has detected a problem. You have two choices: you can either take the car to a mechanic and pay a diagnostic fee or you can take the money you would have spent and buy an Onboard Diagnostics-II (OBD-II) scanner. This computer device will end paying for itself, as it will save you from having to pay a diagnostic fee on any car.

Instructions

    1

    Located the Ford Escape's diagnostic outlet. It is under the dashboard on the driver's side of the vehicle.

    2

    Plug the scanner into the diagnostic outlet and turn it on.

    3

    Turn the car on.

    4

    Wait for the scanner to recognize the car. The error code should pop up fairly quickly. If it doesn't, look at the diagnostic port and ensure that the device is plugged all the way in.

    5

    Write the code down on a slip of paper and turn your car off. Turn the scanner off and disconnect it.

Selasa, 23 Februari 2010

Troubleshooting the Electric Fuel Pump on a 1995 Ford F150

Troubleshooting the Electric Fuel Pump on a 1995 Ford F150

Ford F150s manufactured in 1995 use an in-tank fuel delivery module, or FDM, that includes a high pressure pump, a venture pump, a pressure relief valve and shuttle selector valve all housed inside a canister. Dual tank models have an FDM mounted in each tank and a dash mounted selector switch. A faulty FDM will result in fuel pressure loss or a no run condition. Troubleshooting starts with a very basic test.

Instructions

    1

    Verify the fuel pump is operational in start up mode by turning the key to the on position but do not start the engine. You should hear a whirring noise as the pump pressurizes the system. The whirring sound should last one second. If the pump fails to run either the fuel pump or a portion of the pump circuit has failed.

    2

    Perform the engine off pressure test by causing the FDM to run continuously. Find the Data Link Connector, DLC, in the engine compartment; it is on the driver's side of the engine behind the air cleaner housing. Ground the fuel pump terminal of the connector and turn the key to on, this will cause the FDM to run constantly. Listen for the whirring sound as in the previous step. If the FDM fails to run then there is a problem in the fuel pump circuit or the pump needs replacing.

    3

    Perform the engine off pressure test by installing a pressure gauge to Schrader valve on the fuel rail. The gauge must be capable of reading pressures of 100 psi or above. Ground the fuel pump terminal of the DLC as in the previous step. The normal pressure range is 35 to 45 psi. If the pressure is out of this range then the problem is likely the pressure regulator.

    4

    If the check engine light is on then retrieve the diagnostic codes from the engine. This is done by attaching a code reader to the DLC. The codes for fuel system primary circuit failure are 87 and 556.

What Is the Meaning of Code 1250 on a 1999 BMW 323i?

Onboard diagnostics, Series II protocol represented a revolution in thinking from a government and automaker's perspective. In many ways, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 were something of a birth certificate for the modern automobile, an official recognition that computer controls were here to stay. While the Feds made sure to make emission-relevant codes accessible to everyone, automakers like BMW still retained the right to make everything else proprietary. This has created a whole host of code-reading problems, particularly when you don't know if the code you're getting is real or just a scanner-generated error message.

OBD Code Basics

    The federal government mandated a switch to OBD Series II programming language in 1996 to facilitate emissions testing. Before OBD-II, manufacturers were free to use any programming language or coding system they pleased, which meant emissions inspectors had to have a different computer for every make of automobile on the road. From 1996 and onward, manufacturers had to make codes relevant to emissions readable by any generic code scanner; but other codes were still left to the manufacturer's discretion.

Code Breakdown

    An Onboard Diagnostics code breaks down into four parts: the system code indicated by a letter, the code type indicated by the second number, the sub-system code denoted by the third digit and the specific fault indicated by the fourth and fifth digits. Code P1250 breaks down as P - 1 - 2 - 50 . That first number, the code type, is what's tripping you up when trying to locate this code. In this location, you'll always find a "1" or a "0" -- "0" for a generic or emissions code, and "1" for a manufacturer-specific, non-emissions code.

Code Scanners

    Any generic code scanner will read a code with a "0" prefix, since those are the ones related to engine function and emissions faults. But manufacturer-specific codes -- those starting with a "1" -- may still require a computer key-code to access. Generic scanners don't have these codes, so they'll either completely ignore a manufacturer-specific code, or they'll read it incorrectly. It all depends on the specific scanner's programming as to whether it tells you there's a 1-series code or not.

The 1250 Code and Generic Scanners

    There's a reason you can't figure out what a 1250 code means: It doesn't exist, unless you've got a BMW-specific code scanner. The "1" prefix tells you right away that it's a manufacturer-specific code, which by default means that a standard code scanner won't read it. So, if you're using a generic code scanner that produces any 1-series code, then there's a good chance you're getting a default code it uses when it detects any 1-series that it can't read. The only way you're going to pull the correct code is to take your car to a BMW dealership or a shop with BMW-licensed software capable of reading it.

The 1250 Code and BMW-Coded Scanners

    If you spend your daily latte budget on having your codes pulled at a BMW dealership or a shop that uses a BMW-coded scanner, a 1250 code means something else entirely. This frustrating code is like the Isla de la Muerte; only those who know where it is can find it. And those people are the pirates at BMW's service department. The 1250 indicates an excessively low output from the fuel level sending unit. This could mean one of two things: Either you've run the car out of gas, or the fuel sender or sender mechanism isn't functioning properly. If the code triggered because your car was low on gas, it should go away -- or get stored in the computer as an inactive code -- when you fill the tank.

Senin, 22 Februari 2010

How to Test a Fuel Pump Check Valve

How to Test a Fuel Pump Check Valve

Fuel-injected vehicles rely on a high-pressure fuel system to deliver the proper amount of gasoline to the injectors. The high pressure is provided by an electric fuel pump that operates as long as the vehicle is running. When the engine is off, a check valve prevents pressure from escaping back through the pump, making it easier to restart the vehicle. If your vehicle is hard to start when the engine is warm, a faulty check valve could be the problem.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle on flat ground and set the parking brake. Chock the wheels on the end of the vehicle opposite the fuel pump. Remove the fuel pump fuse and start the vehicle. Allow the vehicle to run until it stalls. Crank the engine for five seconds to remove residual pressure from the fuel system.

    2

    Raise the vehicle using a jack and support it securely on jack stands to access the fuel pump. Use a screwdriver, wrench or fuel line removal tool to disconnect the fuel line on the outlet port of the fuel pump. Beware of spraying or leaking fuel when disconnecting the fuel line.

    3

    Turn the check valve in the end of the fuel pump counterclockwise with an open-end wrench until it can be removed from the pump. Blow compressed air through both ends of the check valve. Verify that air can only travel through the check valve in one direction and is completely blocked in the other direction. Replace the check valve if air can pass through it in both directions.

    4

    Thread the old, or new if necessary, check valve into the pump and turn it clockwise until it's finger tight. Turn the check valve an additional 1/4 turn clockwise with an open-end wrench. Reconnect and tighten the fuel lines. Raise the vehicle with a jack, remove the jack stands and lower the vehicle to the ground. Remove the wheel chocks.

    5

    Reinstall the fuel pump fuse and start the vehicle. Allow the vehicle to run until the radiator fan cycles on and off. Turn off the vehicle. Check the fuel lines for leaks and tighten any leaking connections. Wait 10 minutes and start the car. Check the fuel system for proper operation. Continue troubleshooting the fuel system if the check valve functions correctly but a problem still exists.

My 2000 Camry Won't Start

My 2000 Camry Won't Start

The Camry, a mid-size sedan, is one of Toyota's most popular vehicles and enjoyed a long run as the top-selling sedan in the United States. The Camry has been in production since 1980 and is also a strong seller in overseas markets. While the Camry is known for its reliability, there are factors which can lead to the vehicle's inability to start up properly. Battery issues, ignition problems and fuel delivery issues are the most common culprits in this case.

Instructions

If the Engine Cranks But Doesn't Start

    1

    Check the gas tank to make sure it isn't empty. Being out of gas is a very common reason that a cranking engine won't start.

    2

    Obtain a spark tester and check the spark plugs. Replace any defective plugs.

    3

    Turn the Camry's key on to engage the electronics. If you don't hear the fuel pump pressurize, it may need to be replaced.

    4

    Check the timing belt to make sure it hasn't snapped.

If the Engine Doesn't Crank

    5

    Jump start the Camry as the battery could be dead.

    6

    Leave the Camry running for 15 minutes if the jump is successful.

    7

    Disconnect the jumper cables and turn the Camry's engine off. If it won't start back up, the battery will need to be replaced as it is failing to hold a charge.

    8

    Test the starter and ignition switch.

Minggu, 21 Februari 2010

Honda Diagnositc Codes

Honda Diagnositc Codes

As technology in automobiles advances, owners and repair professionals are given increasingly sophisticated tools for troubleshooting repair problems. Honda's diagnostic tools help pinpoint the source of a problem so mechanics can proceed more efficiently and correctly.

Identification

    When your Check Engine light comes on, the Honda has read a problem somewhere in the vehicle's operations. Your mechanic can scan the diagnostic codes programmed into the vehicle's computer through the use of a special scanning tool.

Features

    Each code is connected to a particular device, mechanism or system in the car. The codes are composed of the letter "P" followed by four digits.For example, P1121 warns of a low throttle position while P1300 indicates a random misfire in the automobile.

Procedure

    The mechanic needs an on-board diagnostics (OBD) II scanning device to read the diagnostics. The tool is attached to a connector located beneath the dashboard. The mechanic then must turn the ignition of the vehicle on before scanning the codes.

What Are Signs That My Master or My Slave Cylinder Is Shot?

What Are Signs That My Master or My Slave Cylinder Is Shot?

If you drive a vehicle with a manual transmission, your vehicle is equipped with a master clutch cylinder, master brake cylinder and clutch slave cylinder. Problems affecting any of these components can cause problems with your vehicle's basic moving and driving capabilities. There are several things you can look for if you suspect your vehicle has a damaged master or slave cylinder.

Leaks

    A car's clutch master cylinder, slave cylinder and brake master cylinder all contain hydraulic fluids designed to maintain pressure in the braking and clutch systems. If you notice puddles under your car, and are frequently having to refill brake or clutch fluid, chances are you may need to replace one of the cylinders.

Loss of Pressure

    Both your braking and clutch systems operate by using built-up hydraulic pressure to stop or engage the system. If your master or slave cylinder is failing or has failed, you will lose this pressure. As a result, your clutch or brake pedal may become soft, squishy and/or have some free travel before engaging. If any of these situations occur, you need to replace the malfunctioning component immediately.

System Failure

    If you press down on the clutch or brake pedal and absolutely nothing happens -- the car does not begin to slow down, the transmission does not disengage, or the pedal goes all the way to the floor without any resistance -- chances are one of your car's clutch or brake cylinders has completely failed. You will not be able to safely operate the vehicle, and in the case of the clutch master cylinder, the vehicle may not be operable even if you want it to be, because you will not be able to shift gears or take off.

Slipping

    If your clutch starts slipping, which is a term that commonly refers to not going into gear properly or promptly, there is a chance your car has a blocked master cylinder or a problem with the slave cylinder. The part causing the slipping will need to be replaced in most circumstances.

Sabtu, 20 Februari 2010

2007 GMC Sierra Electrical Issues

2007 GMC Sierra Electrical Issues

The GMC Sierra, a full-size pickup truck available in 1500, 2500 and 3500 models, was introduced in 1998. Edmunds.com contends that the Sierra is a flexible vehicle suitable for construction workers and families alike. Despite its versatility, the Sierra experiences multiple electrical problems.

Instrument Panel

    GMC technical service bulletins from 2008 to 2010 indicated that instrument panel failure is a common electrical issue with Sierra 1500, 2500 and 3500 models. Instrument panel failure includes poor backlighting, which makes gauges difficult to read.

Power Windows/Locks

    November, 2006 TSBs report that rear power-window and lock failure is common among Sierra 1500, 2500 and 3500 editions. TSBs indicate that the failure is likely the result of a blown electrical fuse. Aside from inoperative windows and locks, the window glass might fall into the door frame.

Exterior Lighting

    TSBs from 2007 and 2008 state that a common electrical issue with the Sierra 1500, 2500 and 3500 series is the turn signal. The Sierra's turn signal may experience improper illumination, which can be solved by replacing the upper-mirror glass. Turn signals might also exhibit increased flash rate, and require BCM reprogramming.

Jeep Code P0122

OBD II check engine codes warn drivers of many types of engine problems and are a standard system in all cars made after 1996. The Jeep code P0122 warns of an issue with the throttle sensor.

Trouble Code Decoding

    The "P" that appears in P0122 refers to a powertrain issue, the following "0" means it's an issue that isn't Jeep specific---it's a Chrysler-wide issue--- and the "1" that comes next means that this is an issue with the emission management system.

Scanner Readout

    An OBD II scanner that comes across a Jeep P0122 code should give the readout: "Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor/Switch A Circuit Low Input." This means that your Jeep's computer has detected a low voltage below the acceptable range, probably lower than between 0.17 to 0.20 volts in your Throttle Position Sensor.

Causes/Solutions

    A TPS not providing enough voltage may be caused by a faulty sensor or wiring or, if recently replaced, it may be improperly adjusted. Check with a trained mechanic to see if you need to replace your TPS. A replacement TPS is not a major investment, and can usually be purchased for much less than $100.

Considerations

    Driving with an improperly adjusted or faulty TPS could be dangerous for drivers as your Jeep could exhibit erratic or no acceleration, stalling problems or throttle surging. See a mechanic as soon as possible.

Tips & Tricks for How to Troubleshoot and Repair Small Engines

Tips & Tricks for How to Troubleshoot and Repair Small Engines

We use small engines for just about every general maintenance chore around the typical home that has a yard, to large lots and extensive farms that have that heavy overgrowth, bushes and trees. We rely on the performance of these engines to get a job done. When they fail to start or break, a few tips and tricks can save most engines from the junkyard and put them back in working order.

Spark Plugs

    Spark plugs work harder than any other electric component on the small engine. They cause no-start conditions frequently. Simply removing the spark plug and cleaning the electrode or replacing the spark plug can get the engine back in firing order. An engine that fails to start or sputters can be the sign of a fouled or dead plug. Removing the spark plug and grounding it against the frame (wire attached) and pulling the pull rope can tell you if it has spark to the electrode.

Air Cleaners

    Small engines suck in a lot of dust, sand and debris through the air cleaner intake. For a rough idle or no-start condition, remove the air cleaner element and attempt to start the engine. If it runs normally, then you know the air cleaner element is clogged. Wash or replace the air cleaner element.

Fuel

    Some see-through plastic gas tanks allow you to visibly gauge the fuel level. Gas might show near the bottom of the tank, but it's best to top the tank off and not depend upon a visual inspection. Most tanks have gravity flow designs and need more than the minimum amount of fuel to start and run.

Choke

    If the engine refuses to run in the "Medium-Choke" or "Run" position, and runs only with a full choke, you have a vacuum leak somewhere. The most probable vacuum leak location will be the mating surface of the carburetor and intake manifold. Tightening the carburetor mounting bolts can stop a vacuum leak. Replacing the carburetor base gasket ensures a leak-free seal. Spray carburetor cleaner around the carburetor-manifold joint. If the engine rpm (speed) picks up, it indicates a vacuum leak.

Exhaust

    The engine needs to exhale to expend burned exhaust gases. The baffles inside the small mufflers frequently rust and deteriorate, clogging the exhaust port. An engine that cannot emit exhaust will hesitate, pop and die. Simply removing the muffler and starting it will tell you if this problem exists. If the engine fires up after muffler removal, the culprit points to a clogged muffler.

Carburetor

    An engine with little or no power can point to a carburetor problem. Removing the air cleaner and spraying a small amount of carburetor cleaner or starting fluid into the carburetor air intake throat can tell if a carburetor circuit has malfunctioned. After spraying, any rise in rpm or performance increase means the carburetor has failed to deliver fuel. Tighten up all the carburetor housing bolts. Remove the fuel filter trap and dump it. Clean or replace the fuel filter trap or screen.

Plug Wire

    To check for spark at the plug wire, remove the plug wire from its connection to the spark plug. Attach a test light to the end of the plug wire connector and pull the rope starter. A flashing test light indicates current flowing through the wire. No current will indicate a problem at the coil or at the armature. Remove the pull rope cowl and sand the armature contacts on the coil, as well as the outside pickups on the end of the flywheel. This will sometimes restore current flow to the wire and plug.

Ignition Points

    If the spark plug electrode receives a yellow sparking arc (spark plug test) or no spark, and the spark plug wire has current to it, the ignition points will be the next thing to check. Remove the pull rope cowl. Remove the screws on the ignition point cover cap and put a test light probe on the main ignition point wire (red). Pull the starter rope. No test light flashes can indicate a bad condenser. Burned contact points will cause a no-start or poorly running engine. Sand the contact points and try a restart. If it runs, it means the points were burned and not making contact. Replace the points and condenser.

Top Engine Noise

    Cylinder heads undergo repeated vibration, expansion and contraction. A hissing "plap-plap-plap" from the top of the cylinder head points to a blown head gasket. Tightening the head bolts can lessen the noise or eliminate it completely. This means a head gasket seal has weakened from age or has cracked and blown. The head gasket should be replaced.

Bottom Engine Noise

    Use a stethoscope to check for noises in the bottom crankcase housing. Loud knocking or clunking will indicate a bad connecting rod bearing. Clicking or clattering will point to a slapping valve. To check for piston slap noise, a muffled knock, pour a cap of engine oil in the spark plug hole. Start the engine and see if the noise temporarily disappears just after start-up. If the noise disappears after start-up but comes back, the likely cause is a scalded piston skirt, worn piston pin or bad piston rings. Bad rings will emit blue-white smoke out of the exhaust when the engine runs at normal operating temperature.

Kamis, 18 Februari 2010

My 1997 Sebring Has No Heat Through the Heater Core

Heater failure may seem a bit irritating at first, but you can at least take comfort in the fact that your car isn't one year newer. In 1998, Chrysler introduced the sludge-bomb 2.7-liter V-6, for which the term "sludge" was practically coined. The 2.7-liter's sludge problems would often manifest as heater failure shortly before the engine seized up with no notice whatsoever. So, all things considered, a little heater malfunction on a 1997 model isn't necessarily something that has to ruin your day.

Heating System Basics

    A heating system is a kind of a second radiator contained in an enclosed air circulation system. When you activate the heater, you open a valve in a line that connects your engine's cooling system to the heater core. The heater core is a small radiator that sits in your car's ventilation system; coolant going through the heater core gets it hot, and the climate control system's blower pushes air through the core and out through the vents.

Stuck Heater Core Valve

    The valve is the primary gate in your vehicle's heating system. If it's stuck closed or doesn't open completely, coolant flow through the core ceases and the heat goes away. The easiest way to test the heater valve is to feel the tubes on either side of it. Locate the valve in the coolant line, turn the heater on and wrap your hands around the hose on either side of the valve. If the engine-side hose is noticeably hotter than the core-side hose, then the valve isn't opening all the way.

Thermostat Woes

    The thermostat is a temperature-actuated valve in the engine that controls coolant flow to the radiator. The thermostat contains a piston and a cylinder that actuates the coolant valve. There's a wax pellet inside that cylinder; when it gets hot enough, the wax will melt, expand and push the valve open. If the thermostat gets stuck open, coolant will constantly flow through the radiator and remain too cold to get the heater up to temperature. This is an easy test -- the temperature gauge on your vehicle's dash will remain in the cold range whenever you're moving.

Clogged Heater Core

    Heater core clogging isn't as unlikely as you might think, particularly with a 15-plus-year-old car that hasn't always used the factory-specified antifreeze and purified water. Clogs happen in a heater core for the same reason that buildup happens in your home water heater: dissolved calcium, lime and iron in the water stick to the hot metal. Over time, you get a coral-reef effect that will eventually block coolant flow through the core. The simple solution here it to fill the core with calcium-lime-rust remover, let it sit for an hour and back-flush it with a garden hose.

Trouble With Keyless Entry on a 1998 Honda Accord

Trouble With Keyless Entry on a 1998 Honda Accord

Diagnosing problems with keyless entry on a 1998 Accord can allow you access to your vehicle without a key. Diagnosing and possibly fixing the remote problem should take no longer than one-half hour. The materials needed for this job are available at auto parts stores.

Instructions

Replacing the Remote Battery

    1

    Remove the rear cover from your remote with a small screwdriver.

    2

    Remove the old battery and insert a new one.

    3

    Reinstall the rear of the remote and test it on the vehicle.

Reprogramming the Remote and Transmitter

    4

    Turn the ignition key to the on position, indicated by the number II on the ignition. Press the "lock" or "unlock" button on your keyless remote within five seconds of turning the key to the on position. This does not require the starting of the vehicle.

    5

    Repeat Step 1 three times.

    6

    Turn the key on after completing Step 1 three times in a row. The locks on the car will cycle through into programming mode at this point.

    7

    Press and hold the "Lock" button within 10 seconds of the car entering program mode. The power door locks will again cycle to confirm entry of this remote.

Rabu, 17 Februari 2010

Car Overheats When Driving at High Speeds

Car Overheats When Driving at High Speeds

Cooling systems are carefully balanced things, tuned very precisely to eliminate just enough engine heat within the packaging constraints of the vehicle. High-speed overheating isn't as simple a problem as low-speed overheating, and generally implies some sort of fluid or airflow restriction in the system.

Heat Exchanger Basics

    Your car's engine produces a lot of waste heat -- about 70 percent of the energy in gasoline goes into the cooling system or the exhaust rather than into the crankshaft to move the car. Engines get rid of this waste heat by dissipating it to the air either with metal fins mounted directly to the engine or through a radiator that carries hot coolant. Engines have to work harder at high speed, which means that they burn more fuel and produce more heat; any deficiency in either coolant flow or airflow will allow heat to build up in the engine rather than to dissipate as it should.

The Most Likely Cause

    Fluid restrictions are by far the most common cause for overheating at speed. Lack of coolant flow can happen for any number of reasons, prime amongst them being a clogged or damaged radiator and a malfunctioning water pump or thermostat. A thermostat stuck halfway shut and a worn-out fuel pump will reduce the volume of fluid flowing through the radiator, and clogs in the radiator will stop the fluid in its tracks when it does get there. You can diagnose a clogged radiator by looking at fluid flowing out of the input hose. If you see water gushing out of the upper radiator hose, then odds are that your thermostat and water pump are fine.

Airflow Restrictions

    Provided that you haven't blocked off the radiator grille or installed a new grille that limits airflow, then bent radiator fins are the likeliest cause behind a lack of airflow. Radiator cooling fins are very thin and fragile, and even the slightest brush with a metal object will bend the fins and inhibit flow. Once the fins bend, the radiator turns into a wall of copper instead of a heat exchanger, and airflow stops. The air conditioning condenser protects the front of the radiator, but it, too, is prone to the same sort of damage. The rear of the radiator is most vulnerable to this sort of damage, being exposed and as close as it is to the radiator fan. Keep an eye out for mud and dirt in the radiator fins as well, since they can have a similar effect.

What You Can Do

    Obviously, a bad water pump or thermostat warrant replacement, but clogged radiators can be flushed either professionally or at home using a radiator flush kit. You can straighten the fins on a radiator yourself, but be very careful -- bending the fins backward can rupture the coolant tube and damage the radiator. Spraying the radiator down with a hose may get rid of caked-on dirt, but you may need to pressure-wash it. If the problem remains after fixing the problem, installing a larger radiator and higher-capacity water pump should solve the problem. Otherwise, install functional, backward-facing hood or fender louvers to extract hot air from the engine bay. This will drastically drop the pressures under your hood, allowing air to flow through the radiator faster than it otherwise would.

Selasa, 16 Februari 2010

What Happens If Hub Bolts Are Damaged?

What happens if hub bolts are damaged is: nothing good. Hub bolt damage isn't the most obvious of mechanical faults, but its very insidiousness is part of what makes it so dangerous. Damaged bolt symptoms can closely approximate those of slightly less serious faults, including bad alignment and worn wheel bearings. If you suspect hub bolt damage, then the smart thing is to address it before an otherwise fine car winds up at the wrong end of a cliff.

Backing Out

    Depending on how the bolts are damaged, one of them may stretch slightly and back out of the retaining threads on the hub housing. Once that single bolt backs out and either loosens or vacates the premises, the other bolts will bend or stretch and create some clearance in between the hub flange's face and the hub mount. The hub will subsequently exert a shifting, lateral stress on the bolts, deforming them even more and galling the assembly.

Galling

    After the bolts have backed out enough to create clearance in between the hub and hub mounts, the car's vertical, lateral and longitudinal loads will transfer to the remaining bolt shafts instead of to the flat hub mount where it belongs. Those stresses will eventually bend the remaining bolt shafts, which will at that point go out of concentricity with their associated bolt holes. This will cause galling in the bolt holes, making them oblong and stripping the threads in the hole.

Snap

    After the threads have galled enough, one of two things will happen. Either the sideways stresses on your bolts will snap one or more of them in two, or torsional stresses on the hub or hub carrier will send cracks streaming through them. Once those stress cracks form, it's only a matter of time before the assembly splits like a log and loses its grip on the car.

Aftermath

    The wheel may or may not fall completely off the car, depending on the mechanism's exact design. The wheel bolts to your brake rotor, which holds to the hub via studs and a flange. The center hub bolt may or may not hold the wheel on the car; it may, if you've got CV joints and the axle nut holds the tire on. If your hub bolts fail on an axle which connects only to the hub -- as is the case on the rear of most front-drivers and the front of most rear-drivers -- then wave goodbye to the wheel as it rolls off into the sunset.

The Best Advice

    If you know someone who's driving around with damaged hub bolts, tell them to cough up $15 and buy a new set of bolts.

Senin, 15 Februari 2010

DIY: BMW Fuel Injector Testing

DIY: BMW Fuel Injector Testing

BMW fuel injectors connect to high-pressure fuel lines to deliver a fine mist of fuel for combustion. Injectors on some BMW engines may accommodate significantly higher fuel pressures than you would find in most other injectors. Regardless the fuel pressure used and the durability of the injector, the fuel injectors of a BMW operate in the same way as in other vehicles with fuel injection. The fuel injector solenoid, triggered by an electrical signal, opens a valve, allowing pressurized fuel to pass through nozzles to be injected into the cylinder.

Instructions

Solenoid and Valve Operation

    1

    Start the BMW's engine.

    2

    Hold the pad of a stethoscope against the top of the fuel injector. Listen through the stethoscope to the fuel injector. During normal operation, the fuel injector will make a clicking sound as the solenoid engages the valve.

    3

    Replace the fuel injector if the clicking sound is not present on any single injector.

Fuel Pressure Regulation Testing

    4

    Disconnect the vacuum line connected to the fuel pressure regulator.

    5

    Shine a light into the vacuum line connection hole. If fuel is present in the vacuum line the fuel pressure diaphragm is ruptured. Ruptured diaphragms may also result in gasoline fumes being drawn into the cabin of the vehicle.

    6

    Replace the regulator if the diaphragm has been ruptured.

    7

    Reconnect the vacuum line to the fuel pressure regulator.

Injector Resistance

    8

    Disconnect all fuel injector electrical plugs.

    9

    Set a multimeter to measure "Ohms." Touch both leads to the fuel injector's electrical plug terminal---one lead on each side. It does not matter which lead is connected to which side.

    10

    Read the multimeter output. Note the measure of resistance in Ohms. Repeat this process on all the fuel injectors.

    11

    Compare the resistance readings. All readings should be roughly equivalent. Fuel injector failure has occurred if one injector has a significantly higher or lower resistance than other injectors.

    12

    Replace injectors that fail the resistance test.

Voltage Feed Testing

    13

    Rotate the ignition key to the "On" position. It is not necessary to start the BMW's engine to test the voltage being transferred to the fuel injector's electronics plug.

    14

    Pull the electronics plug from a fuel injector terminal.

    15

    Set the multimeter to measure "Volts." Insert both the red and black leads into the electronics plug leading removed from the fuel injector. Either lead may be inserted into either side of the plug.

    16

    Measure the incoming voltage. The incoming voltage should be approximately 12 volts.

    17

    Replace any injector if the lead is providing 12 volts but the injector is failing.

Electrical Short Testing

    18

    Disconnect all electrical leads from the fuel injectors.

    19

    Set a multimeter to "Volts." Connect the multimeter's red lead to any fuel injector plug lead. Connect the multimeter's black lead to the positive terminal of the BMW's battery.

    20

    Engage the starter of the motor. The engine will not start, but electricity will flow to the fuel injector leads. Monitor the voltage being measured in the multimeter. The voltage should alternate between 0 volts and approximately 12 volts. You may need a friend to assist you with the engine ignition while you monitor the voltage. Leave the multimeter leads connected for the next step.

    21

    Connect a fuel injector lead to the fuel injector. Engage the starter while monitoring the voltage on the multimeter. The voltage should continue to alternate. Repeat this step until only the original lead remains untested. If the voltage fails to alternate when a fuel injector is connected, the fuel injector has electrically shorted and must be replaced.

    22

    Test the final fuel injector lead. Disconnect any other tested fuel injector. Connect the originally used lead to the respective fuel injector. Retest for alternating voltage with the original lead connected.

How to Reset the Engine Malfunction Codes for a Jeep

How to Reset the Engine Malfunction Codes for a Jeep

Disconnecting the battery in your Jeep or any other vehicle is generally not a good way to reset engine malfunction codes. It can cause havoc with other electrical systems in your jeep, such as your radio systems. For the best and most efficient way to reset this code, use an on-board diagnostics (OBD) scanner. It helps you determine what triggered the check engine light while only interacting with the diagnostic system, leaving your radio and other components untouched. The type of scanner you need depends on the year of the Jeep. Models from 1996 and later work with OBD-II diagnostic codes; with nything earlier, use an OBD-I.

Instructions

    1

    Open the driver's side door and locate the black plastic data link connection in the leg space beneath the steering wheel.

    2

    Attach the scanner's diagnostic cable to the data link connection.

    3

    Turn on both the scanner and the Jeep. Some scanners will self activate when they sense a connection to a diagnostic system, and some require the push of a button to power up. The connection between the scanner and the Jeep's system should only take a second or two to establish.

    4

    Press the "Clear" button on the scanner to reset the codes and turn of your "Check Engine" light.

    5

    Turn off the Jeep, and disconnect the scanner from the data link connection.

Saab 9-5 Piston Failure

Saab introduced its first-generation (1997 through 2002) 9-5 to the driving public in 1997. In 1999, Saab engineers noticed that the four-cylinder 9-5 models were exhibiting a high engine failure rate. In December 1999, Saab issued a technical service bulletin (No. 210-1991) to its dealers.

Oil Starvation

    Saab engineers and service technicians had observed a trend of oil starvation in the 9-5. Pistons sustained damaged when the engine was starved for lubrication. The piston head would break off, and the connecting rods would penetrate the engine wall, thus destroying the engine.

Shaft Busing Problems

    Failure of the rear balance shaft bushing also contributed to piston failures. The rear balance shaft bushings would wear out and cause poor oil circulation. This wear would reduce the pressure produced by the oil-squirting nozzle in the piston head, which in turn would reduce the lubrication between the piston head and cylinder wall, causing excessive clearances between the balance shaft and the engine block bushings.

Oil Pump Problems

    Saab engineers identified the problem as the oil breaking down into small, soft carbon particles, which would end up in the strainer of the oil pump, where they would accumulate and restrict the flow of oil to the rest of the engine. The remedy for this buildup involves removing and cleaning the oil pump strainer or replacing the strainer.

Troubleshooting a 1987 Ford Bronco II Fuel Pump

Troubleshooting a 1987 Ford Bronco II Fuel Pump

Fuel pumps typically operate by pressurizing the fuel line to create a vacuum, which pulls fuel from the fuel tank into the engine. The 1987 Ford Bronco II uses two fuel pumps: a low-pressure pump located inside the fuel tank and a high-pressure pump attached to the fuel line and bolted to the frame about midway up the body. Troubleshooting the fuel pump requires locating the diagnostic pressure valve (Schrader valve) located on the fuel supply manifold along the rail.

Instructions

    1

    Locate the Schrader valve. The valve is located on the fuel supply manifold (rail) on the engine itself. To easily locate, trace the fuel line into the engine. The Schrader valve looks like a metal valve stem and may have a plastic cap. Remove the plastic cap.

    2

    Attach the pressure gauge T80L-9974-B or equivalent to the Schrader valve. Purchase of the tool includes specific directions for use and interpreting the results. For simple testing of fuel pressure coming out of the fuel pump, an inexpensive pressure or vacuum gauge can be used.

    3

    Start the vehicle and monitor the pressure gauge. Pressure should be maintained between 35 and 45 PSI. Fluctuations within this range will occur. However, deviations outside of that range imply a fuel pump issue and most likely mean that you should replace the fuel pump.

Sabtu, 13 Februari 2010

How Do I Read the Check Engine Codes on a Ford F350 6L Diesel Truck?

How Do I Read the Check Engine Codes on a Ford F350 6L Diesel Truck?

Ford F350 6L diesel trucks are compliant with the OBD-II (onboard diagnostic) codes mandated by law. The truck's computer operates an OBD system that diagnoses problems automatically. So, if the check engine light illuminates on the dashboard, you will need to access the computer and read the code. All you need is an OBD-II scanner, available at any auto-parts store.

Instructions

    1

    Connect the OBD-II handheld to the diagnostic jack. This outlet will be on the driver's side, near the steering column.

    2

    Turn the handheld on.

    3

    Place the key into the F350's ignition and turn the truck on.

    4

    Wait a few seconds as the handheld and the truck's computer talk to each other.

    5

    Write down the code that pops up on the handheld. You can reference the codes online through automotive OBD-II coding sites, or by merely typing the trouble code into Google, Bing, Ask or another search engine.

Jumat, 12 Februari 2010

My Pontiac Won't Shift Out of Park

My Pontiac Won't Shift Out of Park

Diagnosing transmission problems can be a daunting task. However, problems shifting out of park in you Pontiac might not be a difficult transmission problem. By checking a few things that relate to your automatic transmission, you can often fix shifting problems or narrow the problem possibilities down before taking your car to a mechanic. If your Pontiac won't shift out of park, the problem could be as simple as spilt soda or low fluid levels.

Instructions

Check for Debris

    1

    Remove the plastic pieces around your shifter. Use a flat-head screwdriver to pop out any light components or tabs that might be preventing you from removing the plastic. Center console components can block the view of the base of your shifter.

    2

    Clear any debris from the base of your shifter. Use the multi-purpose cleaner to cut through any dried-on liquid by spraying it onto the area and wiping it clean with a paper towel. Any sugary drink that is has been spilled in the shifter area, like soda, can leak through plastic components and dry onto the base of the shifter. Dried-on soda or juice will make the inside of the shifter base sticky, resulting in a harder shift from park.

    3

    Check to see if this fixed the problem by starting your car, pushing on the brake and trying to shift out of park.

Check Your Transmission Fluid

    4

    Open the hood of your car and secure it so it doesn't fall on you. There will be a dipstick designated for checking transmission fluid in the engine compartment of your Pontiac.

    5

    With your engine idling, pull the transmission dipstick out of the tube it is in and wipe the excess transmission fluid off with a paper towel. Replace the dipstick in the tube for a few seconds and pull it back out.

    6

    Tilt the dipstick into the light so that you can see the transmission fluid on the very end of the stick. Keep the dipstick level so that you get a proper reading.

    7

    Look at the base of the dipstick, the end opposite of the handle, for the level markings. These markings will show when your transmission fluid is low when the fluid on the end of your dipstick covers no more than the "Low" end of the spectrum. Low transmission fluid levels can cause your transmission to not shift into gear.If the fluid is low, fill the transmission fluid reservoir with transmission fluid approved for your car.

    8

    Check to see if this fixed the problem by pushing on the brake and trying to shift out of park.

Check for Broken Cables

    9

    Jack your car up. Once the car is jacked up you can place jack stands on either side of the car's frame to safely keep it elevated while you work.

    10

    Crawl under your car so that you are positioned under the transmission of your Pontiac. This will be in about the center of the underside of your car.

    11

    Feel on the side of your transmission, by the pan that holds the fluid, for a cable that is hooked to an assembly that moves back and forth, lengthwise of your transmission. This cable is the shifter cable and connects your shifter in the car to the transmission. This shifts the car from gear to gear, including to and from park.

    12

    Pull gently on the cable. If it is really loose or hanging down from the transmission, the cable is probably broken, causing there to be no connection from the shifter to the transmission.

    13

    Move the assembly manually by putting the shifter inside the car into neutral and pushing the assembly on the side of the transmission down two notches to get it into the highest gear. This is only a temporary fix that will allow you to drive to a mechanic to get this fixed.

Take it to an Auto Mechanic

    14

    Hire a professional to fix your car. Fixing internal transmission components requires someone with the skill and knowledge of transmissions to diagnose and fix. You can check with the Better Business Bureau for licensed mechanics in your area.

    15

    Call your auto mechanic and arrange for someone to come look at your car or get it towed into the shop. If your car won't shift out of park and your shifter, transmission fluid and shifter cable are all in proper working order, there is probably a problem with an internal component of your transmission.

    16

    Tell the auto shop that your car will not shift out of park. If your car needs to be towed in, it is helpful for the shop to know what the problem with the car is so they can bring the right equipment to load the vehicle or even fix your vehicle on the spot.

The Signs of a Bad Ball Joint and Spindle

The ball joint and spindle are components of your vehicle's steering and suspension system. A bad ball joint or spindle can cause problems with your vehicle and greatly increases the chances of being involved in a serious accident due to loss of steering control. There are several things to look for if you suspect that your car has a malfunctioning or broken ball joint or spindle.

Tire Wear

    A bad ball joint or broken spindle can cause your vehicle's tires to wear unevenly. If your car's tires appear to have more tread left on the inside than the outside, you should check the ball joints and spindle, along with the rest of the suspension.

Steering Problems

    Your car's ball joint is an integral part of the steering system. If the ball joint is extremely worn out or breaks, you can expect to have steering problems with your vehicle. In some cases, you may be completely unable to steer the vehicle. This is why you should have your ball joints periodically checked and replaced by a mechanic. AA1Car recommends replacing the ball joints when your car has racked up between 70,000 and 150,000 of mileage.

Noises

    Broken or malfunctioning ball joints and spindles can cause your car to make strange noises when driving down the road. Grinding, popping or any other noises that seem to be coming from your wheel or tire area need to be checked by a mechanic as soon as possible.

How to Troubleshoot a Four-wheel-drive in a 2000 Dodge RAM

How to Troubleshoot a Four-wheel-drive in a 2000 Dodge RAM

Some of Chrysler's Dodge Ram trucks are equipped with four-wheel-drive systems. The transfer case can be manually shifted with a lever, or on some models, electronically shifted through dashboard controls. Problems with a four-wheel-drive system in a 2000 Ram can be related to the controls and the environments necessary for shifting between the different types of four-wheel-drive. These kinds of issues can be corrected through troubleshooting.

Instructions

    1

    Allow the front or rear wheels to stop spinning if the truck won't shift into four-wheel-drive. The Dodge truck isn't equipped with synchronization, so the front and rear driveshafts must be spinning at the same speeds for the shift to take place.

    2

    Keep speeds below 25 miles per hour when you operate the truck in the "4LO", or four-wheel-drive low, position if results are unexpected. The engine speed is three times that of two-wheel-drive when in "4LO."

    3

    Check for correct tire pressure, uneven tire wear, excessive loading or cold temperatures if the truck delays in shifting out of four-wheel-drive. Check the information sticker on the driver's side door pillar for tire-inflation requirements and for weight of the vehicle and load. Remember that weight maximums include passengers as well as cargo.

    4

    Use the correct variant of two- or four-wheel-drive if traction is poor. Use "2H," or two-wheel drive high, for regular dry pavement. Use "4H" for slippery conditions. "N" is the neutral position for being towed and "4LO" is for deep sand, mud, water or steep inclines. You can also use it for towing heavy equipment.

How to Troubleshoot a 2000 Dodge Truck

How to Troubleshoot a 2000 Dodge Truck

The 2000 Dodge Ram pickup was manufactured in 1500 and 2500 models. The 1500 has a 5.2-liter V8 engine and the 2500 has a 5.9-liter V8 engine. The pickup is a powerful model with four wheel drive and a five speed manual transmission or a four speed automatic. Troubleshooting the pickup requires the ability to monitor the transmission and engine performance on a regular basis. You also must have access to an electronic reader to test the sensors.

Instructions

    1

    Plug the electronic reader into the outlet located beneath the driver's side dash. Turn on the reader and turn the key to engage the power. Allow the reader to communicate with truck and follow the on-screen directions. The reader will run an initial test before instructing you to start the truck. Leave the truck running until the reader has completed all of the tests. Read the results to determine if any sensors require replacement. The crankshaft position sensor is a common issue in the 2000 Dodge Ram.

    2

    Replace the starter if the engine will not engage and the battery and alternator are good. The starter will make a clicking sound if it is not completely dead. Hit the starter with a hammer and attempt to start. If the starter continues to fail, remove the two bolts with a socket wrench and have it tested by a mechanic.

    3

    Monitor the engine temperature gauge as you drive the truck. If the temperature gauge shows a high reading, stop driving the vehicle and check the coolant level. Also, inspect the manifold gasket and engine compartment for leaks. The manifold gasket is a common issue in the Dodge and may require replacement.

    4

    Accelerate and decelerate as you drive. If the transmission vibrates when it shifts, the Output Shaft Speed Sensor may be intermittently failing. This is a common problem in the 2000 Dodge pickup, but it will not be detected by the reader until the sensor has completely failed.

    5

    Pump the brakes several times to test for damage. Squeaking and grinding indicate normal wear in the brake pads and the rotors, but hard vibrations and loss of pressure in the brake indicate a failing axle speed sensor.

Kamis, 11 Februari 2010

1995 Ford Explorer Transmission Problems

1995 Ford Explorer Transmission Problems

The 1995 Ford Explorer has several recalls on the vehicle as of 2010; Explorer owners should check with their local dealership to ensure these recalls no longer apply to their vehicle. Ford has recalled the Explorer for problems with the headlights, the suspension and the hatchback lift support, as well as other items such as the factory tires and front air bags. Unfortunately, none of these recalls have dealt with the transmission problems many Explorer owners have complained about.

Low Transmission Fluid

    One of the biggest problems with the 1995 Ford Explorer transmission centers on its transmission fluid leaking or running low, causing problems. To check the transmission fluid level properly, Explorer owners must pull the dipstick and clean it with a paper towel while the Explorer idles. Excessively low transmission fluid levels can create multiple transmission problems such as slipping gears or slow start-up when the drive pushes the accelerator from a stopped position; in some cases, the Explorer will not move at all. Explorer owners should refill the transmission fluid to the proper level, ensuring that they do not overfill the transmission. Check the color and smell of the transmission fluid to ensure you do not need to change it. If the transmission fluid is dark brown or smells burnt, flush and change the transmission fluid.

Transmission Filter

    The 1995 Ford Explorer's transmission contains a filter that filters out debris stemming from general wear of the gears. Damage to or clogging of this filter can cause transmission problems in the Ford Explorer. The transmission filter will cause the Explorer to jump or stall because of overheating, and the vehicle will even lose power when accelerating. Drain the transmission fluid through a drain plug located under the vehicle, then remove the pan that covers the transmission filter. You can easily remove and change the filter once you remove the pan.

Seals Leaking

    A 1995 Ford Explorer can come in four- or two-wheel drive, which makes a difference in the number driveshaft seals on the transmission. These seals have a tendency of wearing out quickly on the 1995 Explorer; Ford has not given a reason for this transmission problem. When the seals are leaking, you will notice droplets of transmission fluid under the vehicle when the Explorer has sat in one place for a while. Four-wheel-drive Explorers will have front and rear seals, while two-wheel-drive will only have a rear seal. These seals can deteriorate over time, causing the transmission fluid to leak out and create multiple issues with the transmission such as slippage or slow start-up.

Signs & Symptoms of a Bad Catalytic Converter

Signs & Symptoms of a Bad Catalytic Converter

A catalytic converter is a part in your car that reduces the toxicity of the emissions produced by your engine. Catalytic converters first made it to the United States in 1981, and today more than 95 percent of new cars sold worldwide have catalytic converters. The converters remove up to 98 percent of the pollution created by your car and help the engine perform more efficiently. Pay attention to several signs and symptoms of a bad catalytic converter and take your car to a mechanic to get it replaced if you notice them in your own ride.

Poor Engine Performance

    A bad or restricted catalytic converter will hamper the performance of your engine. You'll notice a loss in power at higher engine speeds, or that the engine may be difficult to start. You may also find it difficult to accelerate. You may get fewer miles per gallon on the car as well.

Hot Engine

    If you notice your engine running hotter than normal at constant cruising speeds, this may indicate you have poor efficiency. That's another sign of a bad catalytic converter.

Foul Odor

    If your catalytic converter has gone bad, you may notice a rotten egg odor, which is the result of too much hydrogen sulfide production due to an imbalance in the air and fuel mixture or a high fuel sulfur content. If you do not deal with this problem, the converter may melt down.

Very Hot Converter

    If the converter is red hot, that is an indication that the converter is being exposed to raw fuel. Left unsolved, this will cause an excessively rich air and fuel mixture or an engine misfire, which may lead to a restricted converter.

Rattling

    If you have a monolith-type converter that rattles when you tap it with your fist or a mallet, your converter may have become "cold-quenched." This is when your red-hot converter contacts snow or ice, leading to a sudden contraction in the converter housing and causing cracks.

Ford Windstar Dome Light Problems

Ford Windstar Dome Light Problems

The Windstar is a family mini-van manufactured by the Ford Motor Company. Reports concerning dome light problems in the Windstar are found on many car review websites including Edmunds. The dome light illuminates the interior of the Windstar. Reported dome light problems range from bulb problems to major wiring problems.

Blown Bulb

    The Ford Windstar has two dome lights, one located toward the front of the van and one at the rear of the van. Some Windstar owners may experience a prematurely blown dome light. This dome light problem occurs in the front dome light as well as the rear dome light. No specific cause is attributed to this dome light problem and can be easily repaired by replacing the bulb.

Light Remains On

    Many complaints are reported by Ford Windstar owners concerning the dome light remaining on after the doors are closed. This dome light problem is attributed to a switch problem in the door panel. The switch is breaking or cracking, causing the contact of the switch not to engage. When the contacts do not engage, the dome light remains on. Because the contacts are not engaging, the dome lights still receive voltage.

Dome Light Flickers

    The Ford Windstar could have a problem with the dome light flickering during normal driving conditions. A technical service bulletin was published concerning this dome light problem. The TSB states that a wiring problem is causing many of the trouble codes, warning lights and dome lights to intermittently flicker. This electrical problem can only be repaired by a qualified technician.

Dome Light Fuse

    A TSB published on the Ford Windstar concerns the dome light fuse failing. Once the fuse fails, the dome lights do not illuminate. An overcurrent charge is causing the fuse to blow and is primarily happening during start-up. The fuse protects the dome light from this sudden surge of current, but blows. No specific cause is attributed to this sudden surge of voltage.

What Could Happen if You Drive a Car With a Bad CV Joint?

Constant velocity joint failure generally starts out as a set of fairly predictable symptoms, but will always end in a very predictable fashion. The CV joint is one of the most constantly and highly stressed components in your vehicle's drivetrain, and it's certainly among the most important. Play with CV joint failure at your peril, or fix it and make it home.

CV Joint Basics

    Most automobiles that use constant velocity joints use at least two of them: one on the inside, near the transaxle, and another on the outside just behind the wheel hub. An axle shaft connects the two. The inner CV joint is usually a simple "tripod" design that permits enough movement to allow the suspension to go up and down without binding. The outer CV joint -- usually a more complex Rzeppa joint -- is under a lot more stress, tasked not only with handling suspension movement, but doing so while allowing the wheels to turn.

Inner Joint Wear

    CV joints maintain very tight internal tolerances, generally close enough that only grease will fit within them. If the CV joint wears excessively, then those tolerances will open up and allow the wheel and transmission output to spin at slightly different speeds. When the two do engage, one hammers on the other and imparts an impact force onto it. Inner CV joints exhibit a fairly standard set of symptoms when they wear, tapping or clunking when a driver hits either the brake or the gas. In more extreme cases, the inner CV joint may rap or pop when the driver hits a bump. At that point, the joint is thoroughly hashed.

Outer Joint Wear

    Outer joints will typically manifest with the same symptoms as inner joints, with one exception: Because the outer joint also bends to permit steering, it'll pop and snap more when a driver turns the wheel. Turning the wheel puts more lateral stress on the joint, which twists its internal components out of shape and causes them to bind. Inner CV joints may also pop a bit when you turn the wheel, but not nearly as much as outer joints.

Troubleshooting Outer Joints

    A car's inner steering wheel (the left wheel in a left turn, the right in a right turn) turns at a sharper angle than the outer wheel, which puts more stress on the joint. If the tapping is louder when you turn left than right, then the bad joint is on your left-front. When testing for the CV joint, make sure to drive in very slow circles in an empty parking lot; otherwise, you'll end up transferring some of the car's weight to the other joint and confusing the test.

Total Failure

    Continuing to drive a car with a bad CV joint will ultimately lead to complete axle failure. The hammering impact forces in the initial stages of failure will eventually break the joint outright, at which point it is only held together by the rubber dust boot. The dust boot will hold it together for a little while, but most automotive differentials will route power through the twisty CV joint rather than through the one on the other side. This will eventually either cause it to slip on the axle shaft or rip it in two. The former will leave you stranded on the side of the road, while the latter will leave your axle in the road after you run over it.

Alternatives to R12 Refrigerant

R12 is a type of refrigerant that was used in air conditioning systems of older cars sold in the United States. Today, R12 refrigerant is no longer available due to its environmental impact, so you may want to consider using one of the alternatives which are cheaper, legal to acquire and more environmentally friendly.

R134a Refrigerant

    The direct alternative to R12 refrigerant is R134a refrigerant, which does not typically require you to modify your air conditioning system. Additionally, it's the only refrigerant that's approved as a replacement for R12 by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. Depending on the design of your car's air conditioning system, you may need to perform specific retrofitting procedures before you can begin using R134a as a replacement.

Refrigerant Blends

    Non-EPA approved replacements for R12 refrigerant include several brands that contain a mixture of R134a, HCFC-142b or R22 refrigerant. The advantage of using a mixture is that you can sometimes avoid having to perform any retrofitting to get it to work with your existing AC system. The suppliers of mixture alternatives claim that they are refrigerants than R134a.

Alternative Examples

    Three examples of mixture R12 alternatives are Free Zone, Freeze 12 and FRIGC. Free Zone is a combination of 79% R134a, 19% FCFC-142b and 2% lubricant. This is much different than the FRIGC compound, which is 59% R134a, 39% HCFC-124 and 2% butane.

Illegal Refrigerants

    There is also a group of illegal alternatives to R12 refrigerant that do not meet EPA standards. These illegal replacements include refrigerant mixtures of OZ-12, HC-12a and R-405a. It's important to avoid these because they can pollute the environment due to the fact that they contain excess hydrocarbons. Illegal refrigerants also pose as a fire risk if the vehicle is involved in a front-end collision and the air conditioning lines are ruptured, exposing the flammable gas to potential elements that could ignite it.

My 2005 Jeep Liberty Won't Start

My 2005 Jeep Liberty Won't Start

There are a number of things that could cause a Jeep Liberty to fail to start, though with modern cars the most common reason is a dead battery. However, if your SUV has not been well taken care of with regular maintenance, then there are more complex problems that may be responsible. Generally, in a well maintained vehicle the problem will be in the electrical system; however, in a neglected one, there will most likely be mechanical problems preventing it from starting.

Instructions

    1

    Sit in the Jeep and turn the key to the "On" position to crank the engine. If none of the dashboard lights comes on, the engine doesn't turn over and the the headlights don't come on, then there is a problem with the electrical system, most likely the battery.

    2

    Take the keys out of the ignition and pop the hood of your Jeep to inspect the battery. If there is foam on the battery, then you need to call a tow truck. The battery is leaking acid, and you need a professional car mechanic to fix it because of the potential for acid burns. However, if there is no foam, then you can thump the battery posts with your shoe or a rubber mallet to reconnect the posts. Try to turn on the SUV; if the lights come on, then the problem is not in the electrical system. If the engine turns over but does not start, then you may have a dead battery and need a new one. The battery can be removed by unscrewing the battery posts and retaining clamps by hand, though a flat head screwdriver can be used for leverage. Slide the battery out by pulling on its built-in handle then sliding the new battery into place. Reconnect the retaining clasp and post clamps by hand, then try turning the car on again.

    3

    Turn the car off if the Jeep Liberty won't start after installing a new battery but the electrical system is functional. You may have a flooded engine, which means that the spark plugs are wet and cannot generate a spark. To dry the plugs, you need to enable the Clear Flood mode by depressing the accelerator all the way to the floor first then continually turning the ignition on and off. This will cause the motor to pump air instead of fuel through the cylinders and will dry off the spark plugs. After a few minutes, take your foot off the accelerator and the key out of the ignition. If your Jeep Liberty does not start after this, you have a mechanical problem and will need to use custom diagnostic equipment to properly troubleshoot the issue.

How Do I Diagnose Car Trouble for a 1981 Camero?

How Do I Diagnose Car Trouble for a 1981 Camero?

In 1981 Chevrolet began installing onboard computers into the Camaros Z28 models. This onboard computer is called the ECM or Engine Computer Module. The ECM was connected to many of the electrical components of the Camaro. In theory, the ECM provided a fast diagnosis as to potential problems with the vehicle by hooking it up to a larger computer that would read the error messages generated. There are a number of areas to look for in problems with a 1981 Camaro. For most vehicles, it's either the energy flow, the air flow or the fuel flow. With a 29-year-old vehicle, there are other issues.

Instructions

The Basics

    1

    Turn the key in the ignition just far enough to turn on the interior electronics. Check the radio, lights and signals to make sure each turns on. The first basic issue you are checking is the energy flow. The electricity travels from the battery to each electrical component in the engine and to the fuse box. If the interior electronics are working and the electrical components of the engine are working, the energy flow should be fine.

    For a closer diagnosis, check the distributor cap, the spark plugs and connector wires for rust, rot or damage. The second generation Camaro from 1981 had the side mount style batteries. The factory-installed battery was the Delco Freedom type.

    2

    Inspect the air flow of the vehicle. Open the hood and remove the air filter. Check for holes or encrusted debris in the filter; this may need to be replaced. Check the air intake hoses behind the air filter for leaves, dirt or anything else that may block air flow into the engine. If you cannot find blockage and the filter is in reasonably good condition, purchase a carburetor cleaner from an auto supply store and following the directions. The Camaro's ECM was connected to the carburetor and controlled the mixture of air and fuel in the right proportions to generate the small explosion necessary to start the engine.

    3

    Check the fuel flow of the vehicle. Inspect the fuel filter, which is located in the front of the rear axle. The fuel pipe line runs from the gas tank into the fuel injection system. The fuel filter screens the particles of dirt and rust from the fuel before it reaches, and potentially damages, the engine. Remove the fittings whether they are metal or plastic. Use a twisting motion to remove the filter. Check the seals on both ends of the filter for debris or wear. Replace the filter. Check the fuel line for leakage, splits, broken fittings and rot.

Beyond the Basics

    4

    Flush the transmission with either a commercially purchased product or have a professional do it. Flushing the transmission removes built-up sludge and helps in locating leaks in the transmission lines and the clutch system. Inspect the transmission cables for wear and rot, as this can prevent the changing of gears. Old cable of copper and insulated wire covering can malfunction easily.

    5

    Inspect the brake pads and rotors for wear. Both should be smooth, dry and without flaws. If you notice fluid has leaked or is leaking onto the pads or rotors, find and fix the leak and then replace both pads and rotors.

    6

    Investigate the "Check Engine" light if it is on. The ECM will prompt the "Check Engine" light if it detects an issue on one of the many electrical components it is hooked to. Sometimes the message generated means that the ECM itself is not working. Checking the basics first, and moving on to the other alternatives will help you avoid an inaccurate reading on the ECM.

Rabu, 10 Februari 2010

How to Troubleshoot Low Power in a 2002 Dodge Grand Caravan

How to Troubleshoot Low Power in a 2002 Dodge Grand Caravan

Driving power is important. If you are driving your 2002 Dodge Grand Caravan and you can't power out of the way of another vehicle, then you could have an accident. If you want to try and figure out why your vehicle has a loss of power, you can try some troubleshooting ides before you send it off to the repair shop.

Instructions

    1

    Take your Caravan to the gas station and fill up with premium fuel. Add the bottle of fuel injector cleaner to the fuel tank.

    2

    Drive the vehicle as you normally do until the tank is almost empty. Fill the tank back up with premium fuel. See if the fuel injector cleaner made a difference. If not, then move on to the next troubleshooting step.

    3

    Replace the spark plug wires with the new ones. Remove them one by one so that you don't forget where they go back. The spark plug wires run from the distributor to each spark plug. The distributor cap looks something like an octopus. Drive the Caravan and see if you now have power. If not, move on to the next troubleshooting step.

    4

    Replace the spark plugs with the new ones. Remove each spark plug one at a time with the spark plug socket and ratchet. The socket slips over the spark plug and you turn the ratchet to the left to remove it. Replace it with the new one in the reverse of removal. Drive your Dodge Caravan to see if you now have more power.