Selasa, 31 Agustus 2010

Does a Bad Lifter Get Worse When the Motor Warms Up?

Every engine on the road today that has a block mounted camshaft has lifters, be it solid or hydraulic. The general purpose of the lifter is to convert the rotational movement of the camshaft to the linear movement required for the valve train. There isn't a prescribed time to the life a lifter, but like all moving components in an engine they can fail over time. Lifter noise is often confused with other common noises, so its important to know what symptoms come from a faulty lifter. It's also important to understand how the valvetrain as a whole works and operates.

The Job of a Lifter

    A lifter serves as the link between the camshaft and the push rod. As the camshaft lobe pushes upward on the lifter, movement is transferred to the push rod and then the rocker arm. The rocker arm pivots downward, working against the valve spring and opens the valve. A hydraulic lifter uses a cushion of oil, to fill the gap in the clearances of the valvetrain. As the Lobe pushes upward on the lifter, and clearance from wear and engine expansion is overcome by the oil inside the lifter, making it as if there is no clearance between valvetrain components at all.

The Failure

    Lifts can fail for a number of reasons. Sometimes, lack of proper lubrication from a gunked up engine will prevent oil from entering the lifter, essentially eliminating the oil cushion. This goes right along the line with dirt contamination in the oil and blocked oil passages to each lifter. The basic engineering of a hydraulic lifter includes four pieces: the socket, plunger, valve mechanism and body. If at any time the plunger becomes loose inside the body or the valve mechanism fails, the lifter can collapse and create chatter every time the camshaft raises the lifter. Lifters can also become stuck inside their bore during movement and prevent a valve from opening or closing properly. A failed lifter can cause bent push rods, damaged rocker arms, and even valve damage if a valve is stuck open during the combustion process.

Tale Tale Signs

    Most can confuse an engine knock or even spark knock with a faulty lifter. The valve train in any engine is known for creating a ticking noise any time there is excessive clearance. The ticking noise of a lifter fault will come from mid engine level or at the very top of the engine below the valve covers. A sticking or otherwise faulty lifter will often result in its related cylinder misfiring and overall sluggish engine performance. In the end, anytime these signs begin to surface, it should be fixed quickly to prevent further engine damage and excessive repair bills.

Starting Up to Warm Up

    Sometimes slightly clogged oil passages will cause lifter ticking for the first minute or two until the engine warms up. This happens because the oil is thicker when cool and as the oil warms it can work its way through clogged passages and the lifter can work as normal. In most cases if a lifter has actually failed or is worn enough to make noise, the noise will remain roughly the same regardless of engine temperature. On the other hand, if your oil hasn't been changed and has lost its lubrication properties extra chatter could be created from lack of lubrication. The same concept goes for situations where too thin of an oil has been added to the engine, preventing proper lubrication.

Problems With the Transmission in a 2003 Honda Civic

Problems With the Transmission in a 2003 Honda Civic

Transmission problems with 2003 Honda Civic have been an issue that Honda owners have complained about most, according to Car Complaints. These transmission issues have run from a major problem, such as the torque converter, to Civic owners not checking the transmission fluid, causing the Honda to vibrate on take-off. The 2003 Honda Civic has 16 different recalls, but none of these concern problems with the transmission.

Torque Converter

    The biggest transmission problem with the 2003 Honda Civic has been with the torque converter in the automatic transmission, according to Honda Problems. The torque converter allows the engine to continue to run while disengaged from the transmission when the car is stopped. The torque converter has been failing, causing the transmission fluid to burn and damage the transmission beyond repair. This is not a problem with the manual transmission.

Jerking When Shifting Gears

    Some of the 2003 Honda Civic's jerk when the transmission has shifted gears, especially from first gear to second gear, according to Car Complaints. The transmission bands have been the major culprit when this begins to occur. The bands wrap around the gears to hold them in place while shifting gears. This defect or transmission problem with the 2003 Honda Civic has required the transmission to be completely replaced. According to Honda Problems, the manufacturer has been willing to discount the new transmission replacement by as much as $1,000 as of 2010.

Vibrating From Take-off

    Another problem has been the vehicle vibrating during initial take-off because of low transmission fluid. The Civic does take-off from a standstill, but vibrates during the shift from first gear to second gear. Maintaining the transmission fluid at the appropriate level prevents this transmission problem from occurring, but if the transmission is run while the transmission fluid is low, the transmission will fail. The low transmission fluid is also being attributed to the torque converter beginning to go out on the Civic. Honda owners must check the transmission fluid level every time they check the engine oil level. If the transmission level is low, then the Civic owner should add new transmission fluid into the reservoir and not overfill above the top-off line on the dip-stick. The Civic owner should also smell to see if the transmission fluid is burnt, which is another sign that the torque converter is going bad.

Senin, 30 Agustus 2010

My Power Window Is Stuck Down & Won't Come Back Up

My Power Window Is Stuck Down & Won't Come Back Up

If your car has power windows, you may be aware that when you lower them, sometimes they don't come back up immediately. No one wants to end up with a perpetually open car window, especially during cold or rainy weather. There are a variety of reasons why your power windows can get stuck in the down position. Although these situations may come without warning, the information below will help you diagnose the cause and make a few quick fixes to temporarily secure the situation.

Instructions

    1

    Observe whether your power window moves a few inches, stops, then moves a few more inches and stops again. Replace the power window motor if this is the case.

    2

    Turn off your car's engine. Turn on both the headlights and interior lights. Check whether any of the interior lights dim when you push the window switch. Dimming or flickering lights mean the window switch is working and the motor is the problem. Replace the window switch if the lights do not dim or flicker.

    3

    Listen for sound of the motor when pushing the window switch. Replace the regulator if you can hear the motor whirring or grinding and the window appears to be off track.

    4

    Move the window manually while simultaneously holding down the power switch. If the window is merely stuck, this method can resolve the problem. This most often happens with infrequently used windows. Loosen the window tracks--the rubber guides attached to the fabric on the door--with a clear silicone spray.

My 1991 Ford Taurus Won't Start

My 1991 Ford Taurus Won't Start

The Taurus is a sedan that is manufactured and sold in America by Ford Motor Company. The Taurus has been in production since 1985 with the 1986 model being the first to be released. Just as with any sedan, the Ford Taurus may have trouble starting on some occasions, especially if your model is a little bit older. Before calling a professional, you can save time and money by checking a few things yourself.

Instructions

    1

    Turn the key in the ignition to try and start the engine. If the key won't turn at all, this may be the reason you are unable to start the engine. If the steering column is not in the correct position, the key may not turn at all. Try turning the steering wheel to the left and right until you hear a click indicating that the steering column is correctly positioned and then try to turn the key again.

    2

    Add one gallon of appropriate fuel to the tank to be sure that there is enough gas in the car for the engine to start properly. The gauge may be incorrect and if there is not enough gasoline in your 1991 Ford Taurus, the engine may have problems starting. After adding the gallon of fuel, try starting the engine again.

    3

    Release the hood by pulling the hood release lever inside the car. Open the hood and locate the oil and coolant dipsticks. Pull each one out and check to be sure that the fluids are fill at least to the minimum fill lines. There could be a leak or problem with the engine if the fluids are not fill properly. Fill them with the appropriate fluids and try to start the engine of your Taurus again.

    4

    Check the battery of your Ford Taurus. Turn the key to the "accessories" position and turn on the headlights or interior lights. If they do not light up, there may be a problem with the battery. In some cases it may need to be jump started or charged but in an older model, the battery may need to be replaced completely.

    5

    Attempt to start the engine by turning the key in the ignition. Listen for any sounds that may be a sign of certain problems with the ignition switch, starter, or fueling system. No sound at all could mean a bad ignition switch. Clicking sounds could indicate a bad starter. If the engine starts briefly but then shuts off or sputters out, there could be a problem with the fueling system which includes a fuel pump, filter, and line.

    6

    Call on a professional mechanic by having your 1991 Ford Taurus towed to a garage or dealership. With an older model, there could be any number of issues when the vehicle won't start. The Ford dealership will be able to do any special diagnostic testing or repairs related to the car's age or model.

What Is a Motor Encoder?

What Is a Motor Encoder?

A motor encoder is essential to the functioning of a vehicle's transmission and its four-wheel drive. It consists of a gear-reduction assembly and a permanent magnet motor.

Location

    The encoder motor is located inside the transfer case, a device that promotes the sharing of a vehicle's power between its two axles. The transfer case is mounted between the transmission and the drive shaft.

Purpose

    The motor encoder is responsible for regulating the timing and gearshifts of a vehicle's transmission. It also works in conjunction with the transfer case to regulate axle shifting on four-wheel-drive and all-wheel-drive vehicles.

Function

    When a driver shifts gears, the encoder motor is triggered to turn to the proper gear position. By using an attached brake, the encoder then locks the chosen gear position into place. If a driver shifts into four-wheel drive, the transfer case commands the encoder to shift to the proper position and lock accordingly.

How do I Check Common Engine Problems on a 2004 Chevy Silverado?

How do I Check Common Engine Problems on a 2004 Chevy Silverado?

Common engine problems can occur after years of wear and tear, even with a 2004 Chevrolet Silverado that is well maintained and well taken care of. Still, finding and repairing the problems can be time consuming if you do not know exactly where to start. A 2004 Chevrolet Silverado is compliant with the second generation of On-Board Diagnostics, so the vehicle's computer can assist greatly. While it will not answer all your repair questions, it can quickly rule a lot of engine components. Also, accessing the system takes only a few minutes.

Instructions

    1

    Place your key into the 2004 Chevrolet Silverado's ignition and start the engine. What till all the systems are up and running and look at the instrument cluster behind the steering wheel. Is the check engine light on? If so, there are active trouble codes within the OBD-II system. If not, there still may be codes stored in the computer that the scanner will read. Trouble codes are often recorded malfunctions. Pending codes are malfunctions that have occurred, but not with the frequency the OBD-II system requires for "trouble" status.

    2

    Turn the 2004 Chevrolet Silverado's key to "Off." Connect your OBD-II scanner's diagnostic cable to the Silverado's Data Link Connection. You will find the DLC port right above the parking break, to the left of the steering column.

    3

    Power on your OBD-II scanner. You may not have to do that, depending on the hardware you own. Some diagnostic scanners are preset to switch themselves on once they detect a live data stream from a vehicle's computer.

    4

    Insert the key in the ignition to the "On" position and activate the Silverado's electrical system. This should wake up the OBD-II system. If it doesn't, then you own a scanner that requires the engine started. If that is the case, start the Silverado's engine.

    5

    Look at the scanner's display. If the scanner hasn't automatically fetched the codes out from the Silverado, then your scanner requires you to issue a retrieval command. Operations, layout, buttons, and the entire system varies by a scanner's brand and model. For the precise way to do this, consult your scanner's handbook.

    6

    Scroll through the codes on the scanner. The codes will be differentiated on the display. You will be looking for "P" (powertrain) codes. Your scanner will also differentiate between "trouble" and "pending." On a sheet of paper, write down all the trouble codes first. Then, write down all the pending codes beneath.

    7

    Turn the key in the Silverado's ignition to "Off." Remove the key and remove the OBD-II scanner's diagnostic cable from the DLC port.

    8

    Consult your scanner's handbook for generic OBD-II code meanings. There should be an appendix towards the rear of the handbook that contains a list of these meanings. Copy them out ont the list you started in Step 6. All General Motors vehicles, Chevrolet included, use additional OBD-II codes that you may have to look up. Neither the scanner's handbook nor the Silverado's owner's manual will contain these codes. The cheapest option includes looking them up on the internet (See Resources), and then adding the coding definitions to your list.

    9

    Return to your Silverado and open the engine compartment. Follow the order of your list, and investigate the portions of the engine that correspond with the codes you have retrieved.

Minggu, 29 Agustus 2010

Mitsubishi Galant AC Problems

Introduced in the U.S. 1989, the Mitsubishi Galant is an affordable family mid-sized vehicle. Currently available as a four-door sedan, the Galant is available in a V6-engine and 5-speed semi-automatic transmission. Despite its various features and low-price, the Galant suffers from several A/C-related problems.

R-12 Refrigerant

    The 1989-1993 Galant models originally were charged with R-12 refrigerant (Freon-12), which is no longer being manufactured. Although R-12 is not being produced, it still is available, but costs $25-$50 per pound. The average Galant vehicle requires approximately 2-5 pounds to be charged fully. Aside from purchasing R-12, you can convert your A/C system to use R-143A refrigerant, which costs approximately $100-$250 for parts and labor.

A/C Condenser

    Auto Recalls For Consumers indicates that the main issue reported with post-1993 Galants is the A/C blowing hot air. Drivers reported hearing "clicking" noises from the A/C system when attempting to use the A/C function. An A/C blowing hot air requires a new A/C condenser, which costs approximately $350-$451 for parts and labor.

Leaking

    Auto Recalls For Consumers also indicates that Galant drivers reported the A/C evaporator leaking under the passenger's side. Fixing the leak requires a new A/C compressor, which costs approximately $863-$1041 for parts and labor.

How to Troubleshoot a Honda Accord Speed Sensor

The speed sensor on a Honda Accord, like other sensors, is electronic. You cannot "see" a problem with the sensor. It might give off clues, such as stuttering or, more commonly, having a dead spot at a certain speed, but you must use a scanner to tell if it is bad. Some mechanics have a computer that hooks up to the OBD diagnostic link connector, such as Snap-On's Vantage or Matco's 4000. Some of the computers only give parameters, which means you must know the specifications of the speed sensor in order to properly diagnose it without a code scanner.

Instructions

    1

    Hook the code scanner to the OBD diagnostic link connector under the dash and just to the left of the steering column.

    2

    Press the "Read" button. The scanner will read the codes given by the computer. The code for the speed sensor on the 1998 Honda Accord is P0500. If the code comes across the scanner, the problem is with the sensor. If another code appears on the scanner, repair the other problem first then start the vehicle to see if the speed sensor code appears. If not, there is no problem with the speed sensor.

    3

    Replace the speed sensor. Plug the scanner into the OBD diagnostic link connector. Press the "Erase" button to erase the code. Start the engine. If the check engine light does not come back on, test-drive the Accord. If the light comes on, repair any problems with additional sensors.

Sabtu, 28 Agustus 2010

Problems With Vortec Injectors

Electronic fuel injection atomizes the fuel through a tiny nozzle and injects it into the air just before it enters the engine's combustion chamber. Vortec injectors are used on GM engines with good results; however, they can run into a number of problems, especially in older models.

Dirty Injector Assemblies

    Injectors and the filters which clean the fuel entering the injector can become fouled with carbon or impurities in the gasoline and won't spray enough fuel into the air entering the combustion chamber. Fouling can also cause the spray pattern to become distorted. The air entering the combustion chamber isn't uniformly filled with fuel. Both situations can cause misfires, rough idling, poor performance and increased pollution.

Electrical Problems

    Injectors are controlled by wires coming from the Power Control Module and receive power to operate from a power relay. If the wires corrode or fail or the power relay breaks, the injector will fail. A short in the wiring of the injector can disable the PCM.

Tubing and Seal Problems

    Injectors can lose the seal between the injector and the tubing leading to the injector from the fuel pump causing a lean mixture of fuel/air and wasted gasoline. This will result in poor performance and increased pollution.

1989 Integra Fuel Pump Troubleshooting

The Acura Integra was a small, sporty vehicle that was primarily sold as a hatchback. It was manufactured from 1986 until 2001 and also came in a four door configuration. The Integra line was equipped with an electronic fuel pump that sat inside the gas tank with the top sticking out. The fuel pump connects the gas tank to the fuel lines and pulls fuel from the tank into the engine. The pump does fail from time to time, and may need to eventually be replaced. Before taking the time to remove the pump, it is important to troubleshoot and see if there are other reasons why your Integra is experiencing fuel problems.

Instructions

    1

    Test the fuel pressure of the Acura. Locate the schrader valve inside the engine. It looks just like the air valve you connect to when you inflate tires in your car or bicycle. Screw on a fuel pressure gauge to the schrader valve, turn the car on and read the gauge to see if the fuel pressure is too low. The 1989 Integra should have between 36 and 41 pounds per square inch of fuel pressure.

    2

    Inspect the fuel pressure regulator of the Integra if you have low fuel pressure. Many people believe that the fuel pump is causing low fuel pressure when the regulator may be the problem instead. The fuel pressure regulator is connected to a black fuel line near the top of the engine block. Gently squeeze the black fuel line next to the regulator with some pliers while the engine is running. Look at the fuel pressure gauge and see if the fuel pressure rises when you squeeze the fuel line. If the fuel pressure rises then the regulator should be fixed, not the fuel pump.

    3

    See if there are any symptoms of a fuel pump failure. The two major symptoms are the car refusing to start and the Acura failing to accelerate when the acceleration pedal is pressed down.

    4

    Listen to see if the fuel pump begins pushing fuel into the fuel lines before the Acura starts. Turn the ignition key one setting to the right. This will turn on the car's battery but not the engine. The fuel pump will engage with the key in this position. You should listen for the pump in a quiet setting or else it may be difficult to conduct this particular troubleshooting test. You may find it easier to hear the pump if you have someone else turn the key inside the car while you stand by the fuel tank and listen for it to turn on.

Jumat, 27 Agustus 2010

How to Troubleshoot Alternator Issues

How to Troubleshoot Alternator Issues

The alternator in your vehicle is designed to convert the mechanical energy provided by the engine into electrical energy. This electrical energy is used to sustain the vehicle's battery, as well as to provide extra power to run the accessories, such as lights, stereos or other optional equipment. If your alternator isn't working as it should, the vehicle is in trouble. The battery will eventually drain and the engine won't have enough energy to turn over. There are some basic troubleshooting techniques for checking your alternator.

Instructions

Test the Voltage Output

    1

    Turn your vehicle and all of its accessories off. Open the hood and access the battery. Depending on the year, make and model of your car, you may need to remove various guards or shields to access the terminals of the battery. You may need small wrenches or screwdriver to remove the guards.

    2

    Hook the negative and positive leads/clamps of a voltmeter to the negative and positive terminals on the car battery. With the voltmeter turned on and set to measure the voltage of a 12-volt battery, you should see a voltage reading for the battery in the area of 12.5 to 12.8 volts.

    3

    Unhook the voltmeter from the battery and start your vehicle. While the vehicle is running, reconnect the voltmeter to the battery. With the engine idling, you should see a voltage output approximately 1.5 to 2 volts above your previous reading. The exact voltage will vary, but if you do not see an increase or the increase is above 3 volts, you may have a faulty alternator.

Test the Load

    4

    Start the engine and connect the voltmeter's positive and negative leads to the battery. Turn on the headlights and switch them to the high-beam setting. Check the voltmeter. With the high beams on, you should see a reading in the area of 13.8 to 14.2 or 14.5 volts.

    5

    Put the vehicle in "Park" and set the emergency brake. Have your helper get behind the wheel and press on the accelerator so that the engine revs to approximately 1,500 RPM. You should now note a voltmeter reading of approximately 14.2 to 14.6 volts. A reading of less than 14.2 volts may indicate a faulty diode within the alternator.

    6

    Tell your helper to turn off the headlights while maintaining the vehicle's rpms at 1,500 for approximately one minute. Watch the voltmeter. If the alternator and voltage regulator within the alternator are working correctly, the reading should not be above 14.8 volts.

How to Check the Engine on a 1998 Ford Explorer

How to Check the Engine on a 1998 Ford Explorer

A 1998 Ford Explorer uses a central computer to monitor engine functions. This computer performs a set of routine checks and self-tests, and it is an asset when it comes to checking the engine. Vehicle diagnostics is often a dicey proposition and it's quicker than testing every engine component by hand. This system is also helpful if you are not troubleshooting a specific problem and you just want to make a precautionary check of the system.

Instructions

    1

    Start the engine on your 1998 Ford Explorer. Wait for the dashboard indicators to light and then turn off. If the "Check Engine" light remains lit, then trouble codes need to be pulled from the system and examined.

    2

    Look beneath the 1998 Explorer's steering column and then slightly to the left. Locate a black plastic outlet set into the dash panel. This is the Data Link Connection (DLC). Connect your OBD-II scanner to this outlet.

    3

    Turn the OBD-II scanner on and allow it to begin diagnosing the electrical system. Scanners vary by brand and year of manufacture, so check the product documentation for specific operating instructions. Some scanners do not need to be turned on by hand and will auto-activate. Other scanners may need more than just the electronic system enabled -- the engine must also be running. Carefully review the scanner's user manual and follow the exact instructions found there.

    4

    Enter a "retrieving" command on your scanner. The scanner's button and cover plate configuration may also differ by brand and model, so the exact buttons you need to push will vary. Again, refer to the user manual for your scanner.

    5

    Study all the codes the scanner has reported. If you own a higher-end OBD-II handheld, the code definitions may be programmed into the device. In any case, you can look up OBD-II codes in the back of the scanner manual. To interpret Ford's special and supplemental OBD-II codes, you will need to go online since neither the scanner's manual nor the Explorer's owner manual will have this information.

    6

    Turn off the Explorer's electrical system and/or engine. Disconnect the scanner from the DLC outlet beneath the dash. Now that you've diagnosed the malfunctions currently affecting your vehicle, you can decide on an appropriate course of action. You can investigate further, do the repair work yourself or take your Explorer to the repair shop for professional service.

Kamis, 26 Agustus 2010

How to Troubleshoot a Jeep Quadra-Trac

How to Troubleshoot a Jeep Quadra-Trac

Chrysler's Jeep Quadra-Trac system is found on some of its Jeep four-wheel drive vehicles. It's a fully automatic all-time four-wheel drive system with only three possible positions: four-wheel drive high, neutral and four-wheel drive low. There isn't a two-wheel drive mode unlike a classic four-wheel drive system. Quadra-Trac is distinct from the Jeep Quadra-Drive system which is a torque balancing system for the axles. Problems with the Jeep Quadra-Trac system can include issues with shift positions, driving and road conditions. These kinds of problems can be corrected by following some troubleshooting steps.

Instructions

    1

    Use the correct shift lever position if driving results aren't acceptable. Use "4 All Time" for all road surfaces including dry pavement, and snow or sand. Use the neutral "N" setting only when being towed. Use "4LO" for additional traction and maximum pulling power on loose and slippery surfaces.

    2

    Shift properly if your shifts are noisy or jerky. Shift in or out of "4LO" while the Jeep is moving, not stationary. The optimum speed is between 2 and 3 mph -- and don't pause at "N."

    3

    Drive at speeds lower than 25 mph when selecting the Quadra-Trac "4LO" setting if tire wear is excessive, or there's been damage to the drivetrain. Remember that engine speed in "4LO" is three times that of the "4 All Time" position.

    4

    Don't exceed safe driving speeds if braking is unexpectedly poor. Even though there's better forward traction with a Quadra-Trac system than with a normal 2-wheel drive car, stopping isn't enhanced at all.

Rabu, 25 Agustus 2010

How to Find a Short in a Turn Signal

Electrical circuits are one of those odd things that are usually a lot less complicated than they appear, especially if you look at it from the point of view of an electron. You -- the electron -- start at the battery, then travel through a wire to the junction box. From there, you might go to an accessory or switch, or you might stop off at a second fuse box on the way. If the switch lets you through, you go to the accessory, then back to the battery through the ground. All in less time than it would take to blink, if electrons had eyelids.

Instructions

    1

    Check the turn signal fuse; nine times out of ten, your short is a blown fuse. After checking the fuse, pull the fuse out, probe the fuse terminals with your test light or DMM, and turn the ignition key to the "on" position. If the light illuminates then you have power to the system. If not, then you're not getting power to the turn signal system. Next, unplug the wiring harness from the appropriate turn signal bulb, and connect your test light to the chassis-side wiring harness terminals. Activate the turn signal to power that bulb, and check the test light. If it illuminates, then you have a bad bulb.

    2

    Activate the turn signal, and listen for the flasher mechanism. The flasher mechanism defaults to closed; when a wire filament inside of it gets hot because of the current flowing through, the circuit opens with an audible click. More resistance in the turn signal circuit will cause the flasher to slow down; less resistance will cause it to cycle faster. If the blinker cycles on and off very quickly, you have a grounded wire in the wiring from the blinker to the turn signals. If it cycles very slowly, you have a damaged wire. If it doesn't cycle at all, you could have a severed wire or no power to the turn signal system. If you have power to the system, but the blinker doesn't flash, proceed to the next step.

    3

    Test the light wires directly. Connect your test light to the battery's negative terminal, and activate your turn signal. Probe the positive wire (usually the lighter of the two) on the turn signal bulb harness, and repeat on the other side. If one side illuminates but the other doesn't, then there's a short in the positive wire for that bulb. If neither side illuminates, connect your test light to the battery's positive terminal. Repeat this test, probing the wiring harness negative wire. If one side illuminates and the other doesn't, you have a problem with that positive wire. If neither the positive nor the negative wires on either side illuminate the test light, then proceed to the next step.

    4

    Test the turn signal switch. The difficulty of this will range from vehicle to vehicle, but you'll be league ahead if you can procure a wiring diagram. Most often, the turn signal switch wiring will run through the steering column and under the dashboard, and will connect to the chassis-side wiring harness using the same harness connector as the ignition switch and horn. But, this can be complicated, so you might try testing the blinker socket first. Unplug your blinker, and put your test light on the ground and power-input terminals in the fuse panel. Turn your signal switch on; if the light illuminates, the switch is working and you have either a bad blinker mechanism, or a short in the wiring from the blinker to the lights. If it doesn't, you have a bad switch or bad switch wiring.

    5

    Test the switch output directly. Sad to say, but the best way to do this is to disassemble your steering column to access the switch wiring harness directly. Test the power-in and ground wires (the latter of which you may not have) for power signal to the switch. If there's no power to the switch, but there's power to the signal fuse and a good fuse, then your problem is between the switch and fuse panel. If there's power to the switch, then test the switch's power-output wires. Probe the output wires, and turn the switch to the on position. If you get no output signal, but get power in, then the switch is bad. If you have power in and power out, but no power at the blinker mechanism input, then your problem is in the wiring between the switch and blinker.

How to Troubleshoot a '93 Ford Ranger

How to Troubleshoot a '93 Ford Ranger

Manufactured by Ford Motor Company, the Ranger is a compact pickup truck. The first model appeared on the market in 1983, and as of 2011, the Ranger is still in production. The '93 model was available in two-wheel or four-wheel drive options, and three cab configurations: standard two-door, extended crew cab with small back seats and a full four-door version. Should you have problems with your Ranger, a few troubleshooting steps can help determine the cause of the problem.

Instructions

    1

    Start the engine and listen for unusual sounds coming from the engine compartment. These could be caused by the serpentine belt attached to the engine crank shaft, or it might be the power steering pump. If you notice the noise increases when you turn the wheels, it is very likely that the power steering pump is starting to fail and will need to be replaced.

    2

    Look underneath the vehicle after it has been sitting for a few hours. Check for a red liquid on the ground that may be under the middle to rear section of the engine. This is transmission fluid and could be dripping from where the engine connects to the transmission. If you notice this leak, have a professional mechanic locate and repair it. If enough fluid leaks out, it may damage the transmission requiring it to be replaced.

    3

    Drive the truck and apply the brakes. If you feel a pulsing or vibration through the steering wheel, this could be an indication that the brake rotors are wearing unevenly. This may require a simple adjustment, but if left unchecked you made need to replace the rotors long before their normal lifespan. It also can be a safety issue because uneven brake rotors may increase the amount of distance needed to stop the vehicle.

How to Check the Ignition Coil on a 1995 Civic

How to Check the Ignition Coil on a 1995 Civic

The Honda Civic was introduced in 1973. The 1998 Honda Civic was equipped with a 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine in the base model. A 1.5-liter four-cylinder VTEC engine, as well as a 1.6-liter four-cylinder VTEC engine were optional for the 1995 Civic. The ignition on the 1995 Civic is known as a Pgm-ig ignition system. The ignition coil is part of the distributor assembly on the 1995 Civic, and is located on the upper passenger's side of the engine. Tests on the ignition coils should be performed with the starting key removed from the ignition.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood of the Civic and set the hood prop. Mark the wires on the distributor cap by wrapping masking tape around the wires. Number the wires from 1 through 4, corresponding with the numbers that are stamped into the distributor cap. Remove the spark plug wires from the ignition coil by twisting them slightly while pulling them off the coil.

    2

    Remove the mounting screws for the distributor cap with a Philips screwdriver. Remove the distributor cap from the engine, as well as the rubber gasket between the cap and the distributor body. Remove the two screws that hold the wires down to terminals A and B, then remove the black-and-yellow wire from terminal A, and the white-and-blue wire from terminal B.

    3

    Turn the selector on your multimeter to the Ohms selection, or the upside down "horseshoe"-shaped selection. Install the red probe from the multimeter onto terminal A, and the black probe onto terminal B of the distributor. This is called the primary winding measurement. The measurement of resistance for the primary winding should be between 0.6 and 0.8 ohms. If the resistance level on the distributor is not within these specifications, the coil should be replaced.

    4

    Install the black-and-yellow wire onto terminal A, and the white-and-blue wire onto terminal B. Install the mounting screws and tighten them snug with a Phillips screwdriver. Install the probes from the multimeter onto the distributor again. The reading for this test should be between 12,800 and 19,600 ohms. If the measurement of resistance for this test does not fall within the specifications, replace the ignition coil.

    5

    Install the distributor gasket back onto the distributor after testing is complete. Install the distributor cap and tighten the mounting screws snug with the screwdriver. Install the spark plug wires back onto the cap, matching the marked numbers on the wires with the numbers stamped into the cap.

Spark Plug Wire Installation in a Jeep Grand Cherokee

Spark Plug Wire Installation in a Jeep Grand Cherokee

Most Cherokees have a High Energy Ignition (HEI), which include a distributor, distributor cap and rotor system. Installing spark plug wires is a fairly simple repair to perform. The wires are attached directly between the spark plugs and the distributor.



Jeep Grand Cherokee V8 engines use 8 to 8.5 millimeter ignition coil wires. The cylinder order begins in the front right cylinder, when facing the engine. The cylinders are numbered "1," "3," "5" and "7" (front to back) for the right side of the engine block. The left side is numbered "2," "4," "6" and "8" (front to back). The firing order for the cylinders is stamped on the intake manifold. They fire "1," "8," "4," "3," "6," "5," "7" and "2," in a clockwise direction.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the hood and remove both the positive and negative battery cables. Locate the distributor that is mounted on the top rear of the engine block.

    2

    Locate the coil post numbered "1" on the distributor and connect the spark plug wire by hand. Connect the other end to the spark plug located in cylinder number one, as described above.

    3

    Follow a clockwise rotation to locate the remaining seven distributor posts. The posts are numbered "1," "8," "4," "3," "6," "5," "7" and "2," in a clockwise direction.

    4

    Attach the number 8 wire to the distributor post and then to the spark plug. Continue this process until all of the wires have been attached. Be certain to attach both ends (post to plug) before continuing on to the next spark plug wire.

    5

    Install the final coil wire that plugs into the top center post of the distributor. Connect the other end to the ignition coil, located on the left side of the engine, attached to the firewall.

    6

    Reconnect the battery and test start the engine to determine if the installation was performed correctly. An incorrect wiring pattern will result in the engine misfiring, and should be corrected before operating the vehicle.

Senin, 23 Agustus 2010

How do I Tell If There Is a Nissan Immobilizer Key?

How do I Tell If There Is a Nissan Immobilizer Key?

If you have recently purchased a new Nissan and can't figure out why it won't start or need to know if it needs a immobilizer -- or transponder key, as it's called -- you can first look in the owner's manual. If you do not have access to the owner's manual, then you can use a process of elimination to determine if you need to purchase a transponder key and where best to purchase one.

Instructions

    1

    Call the local Nissan dealership and mention to them the type of car that you have and the year model. If there is a transponder key associated with your car, they will be able to tell you in an instant. If you need to buy a transponder key, then ask them for a price and then do a bit of comparison shopping.

    2

    Use a professional association directory such the "Find a Locksmith" page on a site such as the Associated Locksmiths of America. Finding a qualified professional locksmith is important as there are a lot of people who are not qualified locksmiths who take out ads in the phone directory and do not know how to properly take care of your problem. A professional locksmith will be able to tell you what kind of key you need and will quote you a price that will be cheaper than the dealership.

    3

    Order your key from the best source for you. A dealership can provide you with a key in about two to four hours. An automotive locksmith will probably get one to you sooner and may deliver it for a small fee, which is convenient if you cannot start the car in question. They will also service your lock upon request and check for any additional errors.

How to Troubleshoot a 1993 Nissan 300ZX

How to Troubleshoot a 1993 Nissan 300ZX

The 1993 Nissan 300ZX is a two-door sports car. The car has a 3 L V6 engine and features power steering, cruise control and a five-speed manual transmission. The car requires premium grade gasoline, and it was built in a convertible and hard top version. Troubleshooting the vehicle requires basic mechanical knowledge and knowledge of the vehicle functions. The majority of the common problems are not difficult to diagnose, but the vehicle does have limited working space in the engine compartment.

Instructions

    1

    Start the vehicle and monitor the engine power. If it cranks and will not start or it sputters and frequently loses power, the fuel injectors are either clogged or leaking. Leaking injectors are a common problem, and they must be replaced in order for the engine to regain power.

    2

    Attempt to start the engine. If the engine is difficult to start and requires several attempts, replace the spark plugs. The plugs on the Nissan 300ZX will foul and create regular issue if they are not replaced immediately.

    3

    Start the engine and engage the parking brake. Allow the engine to idle and listen for random changes in the RPM. Replace the air flow regulators if the engine will not idle at a consistent pace. Poorly functioning regulators are especially obvious during periods of cold weather.

    4

    Clean the air flow meter and replace the air filter if the engine performance is poor. This is especially necessary if you drive on dirt roads and through dust clouds on a regular basis. If the problem persists, the air flow meter may require replacement.

    5

    Monitor the clutch for grinding and slipping. Have the clutch serviced or replaced if it is not easily grabbing the intended gear. The clutch return spring may be weak and require replacement. The clutch may also be worn and due for replacement.

How to Diagnose Low Heat Output on a 2001 Chevy 1500

How to Diagnose Low Heat Output on a 2001 Chevy 1500

Your Chevy 1500 is designed to keep you comfortable in any weather condition, from the heat of summer to the freezing cold of winter. Because of their relatively small interior and their large amount of glass, pickup trucks are typically easy to heat and cool. Mechanical issues, such as low heat output are not only recognized during the winter months, but also make themselves evident when the vehicle's defroster fails to deliver the needed heat for keeping the window surfaces free of frost and condensation.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the hood of your vehicle and locate the radiator overflow tank. It is located on the passenger-side inner fender well. Check the coolant level and add coolant if necessary. Low coolant level is the main cause of low heat output.

    2

    Start the engine and allow it to warm. Touch the heater hoses, where they enter the firewall. Both hoses should be warm to the touch. If a hose is cool to the touch, it is blocked and needs to be flushed.

    3

    Check the thermostat to be certain that it is opening and closing at the proper temperatures. A faulty thermostat can cause the engine to take much too long to reach operating temperature.

    4

    Determine if the blower motor is operating. Start the engine and turn the heater fan selector to one of the "run" positions." Feel for air coming from the heat and defrost vents. If no air is felt, listen to determine if the blower motor is running. A distinct noise can be heard when the blower is operating. If the blower is not operating, check its fuse located in the under-dash fuse box.

Minggu, 22 Agustus 2010

How to Troubleshoot a Dodge Dakota Engine

How to Troubleshoot a Dodge Dakota Engine

After years of wear and tear, potential Dodge Dakota engine problems can take many forms. The engine can backfire, the engine can make knocking noises and the acceleration can lag or falter. For every symptom that presents itself, there can be multiple possible explanations. For this reason, the Dodge's On-Board Diagnostic system can provide a bit of guidance. It will not fix your problem, but it could potentially reduce the amount of time it takes to locate the source of the problem.

Instructions

Dodge Dakotas Manufactured After 1996

    1

    Prepare for troubleshooting ahead of time. This includes bookmarking relevant pages with your OBD-II hand-held user's manual. You will need exact descriptions for generic codes used in all OBD-II compliant cars and light trucks. You will also need to go onto the Internet and locate Chrysler's unique and supplemental OBD-II codes. The Dakota's owner's manual lacks this information. Print out the coding lists. Place both the printed material and your OBD-II hand-held's manual into the Dakota's navigator's seat.

    2

    Connect your OBD-II scanner to your Dakota's Data Link Connector port. The DLC port will be located next to the left kick panel and beneath the driver's side dashboard. If your scanner has an auto-activation feature, it will turn itself on once it senses a connection with the Dakota's computer. If your scanner does not have this feature, you will need to turn it on yourself.

    3

    Turn on the Dakota's electrical system. This will "wake up" the vehicle's diagnostic computer. Depending on the scanner you own, you may have to also start the Dakota's engine.

    4

    Key in a command to retrieve the OBD-II codes from the Dakota's computer. The button layout on diagnostic scanner's differ by brand. Also, some scanners are preset to automatically retrieve codes. Either way, consult your specific scanner's manual for the exact instructions.

    5

    Scroll through the retrieved codes and located all the ones flagged by "trouble" status. Copy these codes onto a notepad. Always investigate trouble codes first. These are frequently recorded malfunctions, and they are the reason why the "service engine" light goes on.

    6

    Copy any remaining codes onto your notepad. These will be "pending" codes. They are still malfunctions, but they have not happened with the regularity of the Dakota's trouble codes. Still, this could be a sign of developing problems.

    7

    Consult the materials you placed in the navigator's seat. Look up the coding descriptions and definitions and copy them onto your notepad. Turn off the Dakota and remove the ignition key. Detach the scanner from the DLC port.

    8

    Open the Dakota's engine compartment and troubleshoot the engine according to the problems on your list. Draw a line through both code and description once you have eliminated them from consideration.

Dodge Dakotas Manufactured in 1995 and Before

    9

    Prepare for troubleshooting by locating the "check engine" flash codes online. You will not find this information in the Dakota's owner's manual. Print out the code list and place it in the Dakota's navigator's seat.

    10

    Put the key into the ignition. In less than five seconds, turn the key back and forth in the following sequence: on-off-on-off-on.

    11

    Count how many times the "service engine" light flashes. Chrysler's flash codes consist of only two numbers. For example, code 62 will consist of six flashes, a pause and two additional flashes. The flashes will be of equal length, and there will be a longer pause between separate flash codes. Write down all of the code numbers.

    12

    Consult the printout you left in the navigator's seat for coding descriptions and definitions. Copy them next to their corresponding code numbers.

    13

    Turn off the Dakota and remove the key from the ignition. Pop open the engine compartment and troubleshoot the engine using your list as a reference.

How to Reset the Check Engine Light in a Dodge Ram 1500

How to Reset the Check Engine Light in a Dodge Ram 1500

The check-engine light illuminates when the computer senses something wrong in your Dodge Ram. Several sensors work in harmony to help keep the vehicle running efficiently and smoothly. When there's a problem, a signal is sent to the engine's computer. This activates the check-engine light. There are different codes that correspond to different parts of the engine. This makes diagnosing problems a cinch. Once the problem is fixed, the light can be deactivated.

Instructions

    1

    Loosen the nut that secures the negative connection to the battery. This is the black cable. Remove the cable from the battery.

    2

    Wait 20 minutes to allow the computer to reset itself.

    3

    Reinstall the battery cable and tighten the nut.

How to Reset the Gauges in a 1998 Pontiac Sunfire

The 1998 Pontiac Sunfire uses the second version of on-board diagnostics (OBD-II), as do all cars made after the 1996 model year. The Sunfire's warning lights and gauges are triggered by the car's computer system. If you see a light appear on the dash, such as "Check Oil" or "Check Engine," and you've fixed the problem, you'll need to reset the gauges and lights to make the message disappear. Likewise, you can also drive the car for a day or so; the system will eventually reset automatically.

Instructions

    1

    Grab your OBD-II code scanner and step inside your Sunfire. Insert the ignition key and turn the key to "Run" or "On," but leave the engine off.

    2

    Find the OBD-II port on the bottom edge of the steering column. Match up the code scanner's connection with the port. It is rectangular and has 16 small ports for the connection pins.

    3

    Plug the code scanner's connection to the OBD-II port. Pay attention to the code scanner's display screen. You should receive some type of confirmation that you are connected to the vehicle's computer system.

    4

    Push the "Reset" or "Clear" button on the code scanner to reset the system warning lights and gauges. You should receive a confirmation on the display screen. Turn the ignition off and unplug the code scanner. Turn the engine on and verify the gauges are reset.

How to Block Vehicle Tracking

How to Block Vehicle Tracking

Global Positioning Systems (GPS) are commonly found in cell phones, computer systems and stand-alone devices that can be used on vehicles. There are two types of GPS systems that are usually used --- a logger tracking system that stores your location on a computer system, and a real-time tracker that will be able to pinpoint your location at any given time. If you suspect that your car has an unauthorized GPS tracking device installed in it, then you can jam its signal buy installing a GPS blocker.

Instructions

    1

    Install the GPS blocker on your car. Plug in the GPS blocker via your vehicle's cigarette lighter, simultaneously activating it. The plug and play feature of a GPS blocker lends for easy installation. Your vehicle will be invisible to any GPS tracking devices.

    2

    Unplug the GPS blocker whenever you don't need it. Remove it by disconnecting it from the cigarette lighter on your car.

    3

    Use a GPS jammer as an alternative to a blocker. If you do not want an obtrusive GPS blocker, or if you don't have a means to power it via a cigarette lighter, then invest in a hand-held GPS jammer. These will jam a GPS signal to receiving satellites, rendering you and your car invisible. Some models are as small as a cell phone, allowing you to carry them discreetly.

How to Test for a Bad Starter in a Nissan 2.4

The solenoid starter in your Nissan 2.4 transfers power from the battery to the motor when you turn over your key in the ignition. If you understand the basic principles behind automotive wiring, you should have no problem figuring out whether or not the starter is working properly.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood on your Nissan 2.4. Turn on your parking brake and make sure the battery is at full strength (12.5 volts) before beginning the tests. Connect the red wire on the multimeter to the positive port on top of the battery. Attach the black wire on the multimeter to the negative port on top of the battery.

    2

    Inspect your battery for signs of decay or damage like rusty corroded posts or bulging, abnormally shaped walls. Replace the battery if you determine that decay or damage exists.

    3

    Take the coil high tension cable off the distributor cap and then ground it with the jumper cable. Ask your assistant to start up the Nissan. Read the multimeter. Readings below 10.5 volts signify a dead battery cell. This is the likely issue. You will need a new battery to fix the problem.

    4

    Measure the voltage of the positive wire connecting the battery and solenoid. If the multimeter reads under 12 volts, there is a wiring problem.

    5

    Connect a jumper cable to the solenoid on the port of the solenoid sitting beside the battery. Hook the free end of the jumper cable to the other port on the solenoid. Ask your assistant to start the engine. If it starts, the ignition override switch is likely causing the problem.

    6

    Connect the activator wire on the solenoid to the red wire on the multimeter. Ground the multimeter's black wire. Ask your assistant to start the engine. Listen for a buzzing sound. Check the voltage reading. A reading above 12 volts signifies a solenoid starter problem.

Jumat, 20 Agustus 2010

Problems With the Traction Control on a 2006 Yukon

Problems With the Traction Control on a 2006 Yukon

The 2006 GMC or Cadillac Yukon Denali has a recall, technical service bulletins (TSB) and safety reports about the stability control on the SUV. The stability control on the Yukon assists the driver in controlling the vehicle during skids or unstable steering conditions. The problems with the stability control in the Yukon prevents the operator from having this assistance.

Hub and Wheel Assembly

    A recall on the 2006 Yukon is published by the manufacturer on a hub and wheel assembly problem which is affecting the stability control of the GMC. The internal retention bolt of the hub assembly on the Yukon loosens because of improper installation and torque specifications. This loosening of the retention bolt causes the hub and wheel assembly to separate from the Yukon creating a stability control problem. Once this hub problem develops, the stability control attempts to compensate for the steering problem and causes the Yukon to become difficult to steer. The hub and wheel assembly needs to be replaced in order to correct this stability control problem.

Electrical System TSB

    A TSB is published on the 2006 Yukon because of an electrical system problem which affects the stability control of the GMC. The electrical system on the Yukon develops a intermittent control problem with the systems such as stability control and other fault messages. This intermittent electrical system problem causes the stability control to engage when it is unnecessary. Once the stability control attempts to correct steering difficulties when the Yukon operator is not experiencing steering difficulties, the Yukon becomes difficult to steer. This problem can create accident situations during normal driving conditions. Corrosion in the wiring harness and electrical components is being attributed to this electrical system problem and the Yukon owner must replace the electronic controls or have them cleaned by the dealership.

Tire Pressure Problems

    Another TSB is published on the 2006 Yukon because the tire pressure regulating system may create a stability control problem. The tire pressure regulating system may fail and cause the monitoring system to engage the stability control when the tire pressure is correct. There may be over compensation of the steering control by the stability control because the tire pressure regulating system is informing the electronic monitoring system that the tire pressure is low or high on one or more tires. Once this incorrect information is sent to the Yukon's computer and the stability control attempts to correct the steering control of the SUV, the Yukon driver will find the GMC hard to steer. The tire pressure regulator must be replaced in order to correct this stability control problem.

Acura Key Will Not Turn in the Steering Column

Acuras are a luxury brand manufactured by Honda. The inability to turn the key while inserted in the steering column may be caused by several issues, most of which can be fixed right away.

Locked Wheel

    As a safety feature, an Acura's steering wheel locks if it moved once the car is turned off. While the wheel is locked the key hole will also become locked. To fix the issue, move the locked wheel side to side while simultaneously turning the key.

Gear Shift

    For the key to be turned, Acuras require the gear shift to be in Park and the brake pedal depressed. Sometimes the gear box can become stuck in between the Park and reverse gears creating the illusion of the gear box being in park. Making sure the gear is in Park will solve the problem.

Locked Key Housing

    On occasion, Acura's key housing can become damaged or malfunction. If the key housing is broken, it will need replacing and must be taken to a mechanic or an Acura dealership for repair.

What Does Choppy Wear on the Edge of a Tire Indicate?

What Does Choppy Wear on the Edge of a Tire Indicate?

Tires are the most important contact components between a vehicle's chassis and the road's surface. They control ride comfort and maneuverability. Sometimes tires develop unusual wear patterns, and these wear patterns lessen the tire's ability to provide safe and adequate traction and contact on the road. Choppy wear on the edge of a tire indicates any one of a few likely problems. Worn or misaligned suspension parts account for nearly all tire wear problems, particularly choppy or "cupped" tires.

Tire Inspection

    Tire are best inspected with the wheels off the ground so they can be rotated and examined. Lift tires individually or in axle sets with a floor jack and jack stands. Choppy wear on the edge of a tire will look like cupping or scalloping, where small sections of rubber have been scuffed off the surface, showing individual indentations. This is not to be confused with "feathering," where one side of the tread line appears soft or worn while the other side of the same tread line has a sharp, feathered edge. With cupping, you can run your finger over the tire and feel the choppy dips and rises.

Suspensions Problems -- Shocks

    One of the most common problems associated with cupped tires is defective shock absorbers. Hydraulic shocks, whether single-mounted or MacPherson coil-over types, hold pressurized hydraulic oil inside a tube or cylinder. The oil is restricted from sudden movement inside the tube. A worn shock, or one that has lost its hydraulic oil, will allow the tire to bounce, creating a scuffing or choppy appearance in the tread. Worn or damaged shocks will allow the vehicle to bounce more than normal, and at high speed, this loss of contact with the pavement tears sections of rubber from the tire.

Tire Problems -- Balance

    Improper wheel balance can cause a choppy or cupped condition on the tire. If a tire is improperly balanced or has thrown weights from the rim, that side of the tire will be heavier than the corresponding sides. This causes skipping, or sporadic tire contact with the road. At high speeds, unbalanced tires can cause vibration, or a shimmy, that is felt in the steering wheel.

Suspension Problems -- Ball Joints and Wheel Bearings

    Chopped or cupped tires can result from worn ball joints in the suspension system. Load-carrying ball joints support most of the weight of the front end, as well as allow pivoting, or an arc of travel, of the lower control arm. If the ball and socket joint is worn, excess play results, allowing side-to-side and vertical movement. The excess movement causes the tire to momentarily lose contact with the road, resulting in choppy or scalloped wear patterns. Wheel bearings with excessive play will allow abnormal tire tracking and angular lean. Wheel bearings must be packed with grease and adjusted according to manufacturer's specifications.

Suspension Problems -- Tie Rod Ends and Bushings

    Tie rod ends keep the steering linkage tight between the steering box or Pitman arm and the wheel. Worn tie rod end joints will allow excessive steering play, mostly in the horizontal plane, but also in the vertical, if very worn. Worn upper and lower control arm bushings allow the wheel spindle to jump, momentarily misaligning contact of the wheel to the road surface. Broken or worn upper control arm bushings will frequently produce a harsh knocking or clunking sound when the vehicle rebounds over dips or raised surfaces. Mechanics can determine if your bushings or ball joints need replacement.

Suspension Problems -- Sagging Springs

    Coil and leaf springs keep the chassis of the vehicle from contacting the body frame. Coil and leaf springs sag over time, lowering the ride height of the vehicle. Excessive sag will cause vertical bouncing, frequently setting up rhythmic up-and-down movements. This condition can cause additional wear on other suspension parts, like the ball joints, wheel bearings, tie rod ends and spindle. Excessive vehicle bounce can cause choppy or scalloped tires.

Tire Problems -- Inferior Quality

    Tires have wear ratings, depending upon how much carbon black is used in the rubber compound during manufacturing. Low-quality tires will have less carbon black in their makeup, making for a softer ride, but the softer material will wear more quickly. A softer tire will show earlier signs of choppy or scalloped wear patterns over the more rigid or better quality tire in the event that suspension components are beginning to wear. Tires that have tread wear ratings of 200 and below will not last as long as those having 300 tread wear ratings and over.

Edge Wear and Choppy Tire Combination

    Choppy or scalloped tires wear either on the edges of the tire treads, in the middle of the tread or both. Excessive inside or outside wear of the tire, in combination with choppy or scalloped appearance, can denote a problem with the toe-in or camber alignment adjustment. This condition shows up on one side of the tire, causing abnormal edge wear in the tread, frequently wearing down to the ply itself. When both edges of the tire are worn down, it indicates underinflated tire pressure. Inside or outside wear can also indicate worn suspension components that have caused wheel misalignment.

Tire Precautions and Safety

    Consult your owner's manual for the proper tire pressure, balance procedures, and tire rotation configuration and intervals. If you see any cupping in the tire tread, first take your vehicle to a shop and have the front end suspension parts checked for wear and condition. Suspension parts must be replaced before an alignment, and this pertains to rear-wheel suspension and rear-wheel steering systems. Good suspension parts and proper alignment will not reverse an existing tire wear problem. Replace worn tires with new ones if the condition is severe enough to affect safety.

Hyundai Tucson Electrical Problems

The Hyundai Tucson, a compact crossover sport utility vehicle (SUV) available with front- or four-wheel drive, was introduced in 2005. Although the Tucson is an entry-level SUV, Edmunds.com contends it comes with a solid warranty and numerous features.

Junction Box

    Hyundai Tuscon technical service bulletins (TSBs) indicate that a faulty junction box may cause several electrical problems. The junction box is a small container that stores the Tuscon's electrical connections. TSBs report that improperly stored electrical connections may affect the functioning of the Tuscon's door ajar indicator and key reminder indicator.

Airbag Modules

    In 2007, Hyundai issued a recall notice on more than 130,000 defective 2005 to 2007 Tucson air bag units. Crash testing concluded that, in certain instances, the Tucson's air bag did not deploy upon impact. Additionally, crash testing reported the deployed airbag did not always provide sufficient driver protection upon impact. Vehicles on the recall list receive a new airbag module free of charge.

Exterior Lighting

    In 2009, Hyundai issued two recalls on more than 535,000 2005 to 2007 Tucson defective exterior light units. Both recalls address a malfunctioning stop lamp switch, which prohibits brake lights from illuminating when the brake pedal is pressed. Vehicles on the recall list receive a new stop lamp switch free of charge.

Kamis, 19 Agustus 2010

How to Read Uneven Tire Wear

Uneven tire wear can be an indication of not only the alignment, but the tire pressure, integrity of the tire, faulty shocks or struts, hub bearing wear, faulty steering components and the balance of the tires. Tires are amazing considering all the abuse they are subjected to on a daily basis. Like anything else on the vehicle, they need proper care in order to provide longevity as well as safety for the period advertised by the manufacturer.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the front of the vehicle and place jack stands under the subframe. Lower the vehicle so it rests on the stands. Turn the ignition key enough to release the steering wheel and turn the wheel all the way to the left.

    2

    Check the tire for a separation of the tread to the carcass. Slowly spin the tire by hand while keeping an eye on the very center of the tire. Watch for the center of the tread to jump more to one side of the tire and then come back to center. Just pick any tread groove and watch for the uniformity as you rotate the tire. A separated tire is very common. It is caused by age-caused dry rot, overheating due to misalignment or balance, or hitting a curb or pothole. A separated tire causes a side-to-side wobble at low speeds, that tends to become less noticeable as speed increases. Look at the sides of the tires. You are looking for a bulge or bubble on the side. This indicates that the tire hit something solid and tore the fabric in the sidewall of the tire. Air gets between the carcass and the sidewall, creating a bubble that could easily blow out.

    3

    Inspect the tire for greater wear on both outside edges of the tread, indicating low air pressure, or wear in the center of the tread only, indicating too much air. Inspect the tread for uneven cupping, which would indicate a bad shock or strut.

    4

    Rotate the tire and look for flat spots or cupping on one area of the tire and not on any other, indicating an out-of-balance tire. Inspect the treads for similar wear on only the inside or outside of both front tires. This indicates the toe or camber is off in the alignment. Toe-in is much like standing with your toes pointed toward each other (pigeon toed). Toe-out is just the opposite. Camber can also cause this type of wear. Camber is the leaning of the tire as viewed from above, either in toward the vehicle or out away from the vehicle.

The Saturn SC2 Air Won't Cool

The air conditioning system in the Saturn SC2 is made of several components, including the air compressor, condenser, evaporator, drying or accumulator, orifice tube or expansion valve, and the high- and low-pressure hoses. If the system doesn't cool, you must diagnose all the components -- there could be a leak or one of the components may not be working properly.

Instructions

    1

    Drive the vehicle to a shop certified in air conditioning. Have them hook the gauges up to the system to see if there is Freon in the system. If there is Freon, the problem is in one of the components. If the low-pressure side is high, there is probably a blockage, in which case, the Freon must be evacuated, then the dryer or accumulator and the orifice tube must be replaced. If the system has no Freon, have the shop put Freon into the system.

    2

    Turn on the leak detector. Turn the air conditioning on high. Hold the leak detector at the vent in the cab, after making sure that cold air is coming out of the vent. If the leak detector senses Freon, it will make a long tone, which means the evaporator is leaking. Repair the evaporator.

    3

    Open the hood. Check the compressor, condenser, dryer or accumulator, and high- and low-pressure lines for leaks. The leak detector will make a long tone if you find a leak. Repair the leaking parts.

Causes of CCM Not Communicating With ECM

Causes of CCM Not Communicating With ECM

The Chassis Control Module (CCM) is responsible for many of the functions on your vehicle. It translates the signals received from all the wheel speed sensors. It sometimes controls your air bag system and also your all-wheel-drive function. It also relays all its information to the Engine Control Module (ECM), which in turn makes corresponding adjustments to the powertrain. A breakdown in communication between these modules not only turns on your check engine light; it also reduces the economy and safety of the vehicle.

Opens and Shorts

    The number one cause of communication breakdown between the CCM and the ECM is open and shorted wires. A break in any of the wires will stop the flow of electricity and result in an open circuit. Any wire that had its covering damaged and is making contact with the chassis or other wires will cause a short in the circuit. If the problem is intermittent, the cause is likely to be a short. The most common areas for these conditions to occur are at bulkhead connectors and at door jambs, where the wires are constantly disturbed.

Bad Ground

    A bad connection at the module ground can also cause it to malfunction and stop communicating with the ECM. The Chassis Control Module is usually grounded through its case. In areas where salt or chemicals are used on the roads, a likely cause of failure is a buildup of rust at the mounting location. Clean and test this spot for continuity to ground before you conclude that the module is at fault.

Wireless Transmitter and CAN Bus

    Some later model cars have modules that transmit some data wirelessly to the other modules. Aftermarket wireless devices may interfere with the transmitter's operation. The transmitter itself can be at fault. Other cars have what is known as a CAN Bus to transmit data. In this system, all the information goes to the ECM digitally with a special cable. This cable can break which will cause an open circuit condition and the signal will not reach its destination. It can also prematurely contact, ground causing a short circuit. Interference also can affect the cable.

Faulty Module

    Some people, including technicians, jump to a "faulty module" conclusion without investigating properly. The modules are sturdy and do not fail often. The CCM, however, is especially vulnerable since it is usually exposed to the elements. Use a proper scan tool and diagnose any problem within the module itself. As with any computer, there could be software and hardware problems. Fix software problems by re-flashing or reprogramming the module to manufacturer provided specifications. Fix hardware problems typically by replacing the module.

Rabu, 18 Agustus 2010

Troubleshooting Lowbeam Headlights That Don't Come On

Troubleshooting Lowbeam Headlights That Don't Come On

Low beam headlights are used for driving in environments where oncoming traffic can be blinded by full, high beams. The lights are set so that the light doesn't spill upwards. This setting is calculated by measuring the distance from the ground to the center of the headlight, and marking that distance in a line on a wall. The car is then positioned 25-feet from the wall and adjustments are made so the light remains below the line. If the low beam doesn't come on in regular driving, or in this test environment, you can follow some troubleshooting steps to correct the problem.

Instructions

    1

    Turn any front fog lights off.

    2

    Point the car at a wall and turn the headlights on. Select the high beam position. All cars are different, but often this can be accomplished by pulling or pushing the turn signal lever. The high beam indicator light on the instrument panel near the speedometer should indicate the high beam is on by turning blue. Verify that the headlights are on by looking at the wall ands identifying the two lights reflected back at you.

    3

    Test the low beam lights by pulling the turn signal lever. If one light comes on, the bulb has blown on the side that has failed. If neither light has come on, the fuse has blown.

    4

    Replace the bulb if it has blown. Look carefully at the lens of the working light from the front and identify if there are two headlight bulbs per side. Sometimes there is one and sometimes there are two. Identify the low beam bulb's position within the housing by turning the lights on and then off.

    5

    Allow the lights to cool and open the hood. Reach in below, and remove the rubber boot protecting the bulb assembly. Unclip the bulb assembly, or bulb, and remove the bulb. Replace it with a comparable bulb.

    6

    Replace the fuse and not the headlight bulb if both lights failed. Find the fuse box and look for an index printed nearby or on the lid. Identify the low-beam fuse and replace it with a fuse of the same amperage and color. Often there will be a set of tweezers and spare fuses in the box.

Problems With a 2001 Caravan Keyless Remote With Power Sliding Doors

Problems With a 2001 Caravan Keyless Remote With Power Sliding Doors

In response to complaints about problems with the keyless remote and sliding doors on the 2001 Dodge Caravan, Dodge has issued a recall and technical service bulletins (TSB). The problems arise during operation of the keyless remote or when operating the Caravan. Most of the keyless remote and sliding door problems occur because of programming problems.

Sliding Door Opens Automatically

    More than 100,000 2001 Caravans have been recalled in response to several complaints: the sliding doors on the Caravan are reported to open without being activated; the Caravan's sliding door and power lift gate are actuating, thus keeping the doors partially open; and the actuator arm is being engaged from the keyless remote or computer without the operator pressing any buttons or attempting to open the doors and lift gate. In these cases, the Caravan needs to be taken to the dealership and have the computer reprogrammed as well as the keyless remote and key cylinders on the doors inspected.

Door Ajar Light Problem

    Dodge has issued a TSB about the "door ajar" light becoming illuminated and the warning signal chiming during normal driving conditions. This problem is attributed to a faulty switch in the keyless remote which is activating the c-pillar located on the sliding doors. A new switch is available for the keyless remote; it needs to be installed to ensure that the doors do not open during motion. The doors do not always come open completely, but the warning light and chime do signal the Caravan operator of a problem.

Faulty Keyless Remote

    Another TSB concerns a faulty keyless remote. The keyless remote quits opening and closing the sliding doors and the rear lift gate. This is the result of the remote not being programmed properly at the manufacturer causing it to lose its signal or frequency. The keyless remote needs to be taken to the dealership and either be replaced or reprogrammed.

My 2001 Express Van Won't Start

Automotive manufacturing giant Chevrolet offers customers many makes and models of cars, trucks, minivans and SUVs, including the Express van. These vans are popular among businesses that need an affordable and reliable way to transport cargo, people or goods within driving distances. Like all vehicles, the vans are susceptible to wear and tear and may after time not start. This condition could the result of a few common issues that arise with most vehicles.

Instructions

    1

    Make sure the van is parked on flat, level ground if not already done so. If not, set the parking brake and chock the tires for safety's sake to keep the van from accidentally rolling while you work. Turn the key in the ignition to the first position and turn on the headlights: if the lights come on, it's a good indicator that the van's electrical system is functioning properly.

    2

    Pop open the hood and prop it open with the support. If the lights didn't come on, the battery, alternator or spark plugs are generally to blame. Look at the battery cables; both positive (red) and negative (black) should be connected to the terminals. If not, place them on the terminals. If they're already attached, remove them put pull out the battery and replace it with a new one.

    3

    Use the spark plug tester to test out the spark plugs. Note which plugs are spent and replace them, although it's advised you replace all the plugs at once, as it'll be easier to ascertain any plug problems later. Have the van towed to a garage to have testing done on the alternator: if it's bad, have it replaced.

    4

    Try to start the vehicle by turning the key into the second position. If the lights came on but the engine has a tendency to stall, the starter may be the culprit. You'll have to remove the starter and have it replaced by a licensed mechanic.

    5

    Check engine oil levels on the dipstick. If the oil reads well below the "Add" level or doesn't show up on the stick, pour at least 4 quarts of appropriate oil (listed in the manual) into the engine by removing the cap and pouring it in. Never trust the dashboard instruments to give you accurate information concerning oil or fuel levels; periodically check these yourself.

    6

    Check the fuel gauge. If there's a malfunction with the needle, it may be giving you an improper reading on fuel reserves. In this case, the van may be nearly out of gas. Try pouring one gallon of gas into the tank and then starting the van to see if the situation is fixed.

Senin, 16 Agustus 2010

Types of Prius Malfunctions

Types of Prius Malfunctions

The Toyota Prius was one of the first hybrid cars introduced by a major automobile manufacturer. The Prius became popular because of the low emissions and higher miles per gallon the Prius owner got with a tank of gas. Since the Prius was introduced in 2001, the vehicle has had different types of malfunctions and was recalled for several reasons, but the biggest recall affected almost 4.5 million Toyota's for the model years of 2004 to 2010.

Accelerator Sticking

    Toyota recalled just under 4.5 million cars, including the Prius, because the accelerator pedal began to get stuck in the floor mat. This accelerator malfunction caused the Prius to speed-up to uncontrollable speeds as well as effect the braking distance of the car. Some Prius owner's complained about not being able to stop the car at all creating accident situations. The dealership replaces the floor mat and modified gas pedal to prevent this malfunction from occurring.

Dashboard Malfunctions

    Carcomplaints.com has reported that some Prius owners have reported defective dashboard displays which cause the dashboard display to go out. This lighting malfunction can cause the operator to not be informed about essential information such as speed, oil pressure, battery voltage and gas tank level. Without this dashboard information the Prius owner cannot operate the vehicle safely or become stranded because no dashboard information is being presented to the operator.

Steering Malfunction

    The Toyota Prius was recalled in 2006 because of a steering column malfunction. This recall affected over 170,000 vehicles, according to RepairPal.com and can cause the operator to loose control of the steering because the steering shaft fractures. The center steering shaft assembly and yoke was cracking creating a separation of the shaft and yoke making the Prius lose steering control. The only correction for this malfunction is to have the steering shaft and yoke on the Prius replaced.

Brake Malfunction

    Some Prius owners have complained about the brakes malfunctioning on the Toyota, according to Carcomplaints.com. This brake malfunction causes the brakes to slip on any surface other than flat surfaces; surfaces such as gravel, railroad tracks or potholes. This slipping problem on the Prius can cause the vehicle to lurch forward when the brakes are applied. There has been nothing found wrong with the brakes by the manufacturer and the Prius has not been recalled for this braking malfunction.

Reasons for Fuel Pump Failure

Reasons for Fuel Pump Failure

Your car's fuel pump is responsible for pumping the gasoline out of the fuel tank and sending it through the fuel lines to the engine. If the fuel pump is not working properly, your vehicle will not get the fuel it needs to run and may either run badly or completely stop running altogether. Fuel pumps can be expensive and time consuming to repair, so it is important to be aware of some of the factors that lead to fuel pump failure so that you can extend the life of your fuel pump.

Fuel Starvation

    Fuel pumps are designed to pump fuel, not air. If your vehicle doesn't have enough gasoline, your fuel pump will be forced to pump air. If the vehicle pumps air regularly, the fuel pump will eventually fail. Your vehicle's fuel pump relies on the fuel that passes through it to provide it with lubrication and work as a coolant to keep the pump from overheating. If the pump is being starved for fuel, it stands a higher chance of overheating and burning up.

    Drivers who regularly run their vehicle very low on fuel, or who periodically keep the fuel tank less than a quarter of the way full, will probably experience fuel pump failure earlier than drivers who keep a partially to fully filled tank.

Contaminated Gasoline

    Gasoline that has sat for too long, contains too little octane, or has too much of a corrosive additive such as ethanol or a non-burnable substance such as water, will cause problems for a vehicle's fuel pump. In addition, these substances can cause the inside of the fuel pump or tank to corrode or rust. Bad gasoline can also lead to fuel starvation due to the wrong substances being pumped through the pump and not providing proper lubrication and cooling.

Debris

    Debris enters your fuel tank from a variety of sources; either it is in the gasoline itself or it is caused by a rusting or corroding fuel tank. If the debris is sucked in by the fuel pump, it can clog it or lead to damage. Some fuel additives help clear debris, but it is a good idea to avoid running your car extremely low on fuel, as debris has a tendency to settle on the bottom of your fuel tank and may be sucked up in greater quantities when your fuel pump is trying to pull the last drops of fuel out of the bottom of your tank.

Minggu, 15 Agustus 2010

1998 Toyota Avalon P1150 Code

OnBoard Diagnostics, Series II protocol was a new and welcome addition to the automotive landscape circa 1996. Toyota's Avalon, like every other car produced since that watershed year, used this sophisticated system to self-diagnose everything that had to do with the car's electronic controls and sensors. This particular code indicates a problem with one of the car's most vital sensors and bears immediate attention.

Code Meaning

    In the OBD-II coding system, the first number indicates whether the code in question is generic or manufacturer-specific. Generic codes, which start with a "0", are readable by any emissions-type scanner; MS codes, which begin with a "1", are specific to that manufacturer. From the Toyota code chart, P1150 means "Air/Fuel Sensor Circuit Range/Performance (Bank Two, Sensor One)". As you might expect, its generic code sort-of counterpart is the same but for one number: P0150 instead of P1150.

Sensor Failure

    So, you may be wondering, why not just use the generic code (P0150) for a bad oxygen sensor at bank two, sensor one? Why use a manufacturer-specific code for something that already exists? Because the sensor in question isn't technically an oxygen sensor; it's a Toyota-specific air/fuel ratio sensor. Toyota's A/F ratio sensors are more sophisticated than the standard O2 sensor, capable of monitoring not only the amount of leftover oxygen in the exhaust stream, but the amount of remaining combustible fuel as well.

Location

    As you look at the Avalon's 3.0-liter 1MZ-FE V-6 engine, you'll note that the intake manifold skews off to one side; at the end of the intake manifold is the throttle body, where the air cleaner tube connects. On this engine, Bank One consists of the three cylinders directly under that throttle body; Bank Two is on the opposite side. On any engine, Sensor One is the sensor between the engine and the catalytic converter, with Sensor Two located after it. So, code P1150 indicates a bad A/F sensor on Bank Two, between the converter and the engine.

Failure and Replacement

    The first air/fuel sensor is the more important of the two where your engine is concerned. The second sensor only monitors the catalytic converter to make sure it's working -- the first monitors the engine directly. So, if this sensor fails, the computer will go into "open loop" mode and use its best guess to provide air and fuel to the engine. Expect a check-engine light, as well as reduced horsepower and fuel economy. Replacement is pretty straightforward; just unscrew the A/F sensor with an O2 sensor socket, unplug it, and screw a new sensor in its place.

Sabtu, 14 Agustus 2010

How to Tell If an Outboard Motor Is Running Lean

Outboard engines, whether two- or four-stroke in design -- are just as sensitive to air/fuel ratio problems as their land-bound counterparts. Two-strokes encounter another complicating factor in the form of oil mixture, which can often duplicate the symptoms of a lean-running engine. If you suspect that your engine is running short of fuel, you need to address it immediately; the next sign of trouble you get may well be a melted puddle of aluminum where your engine used to be.

Instructions

    1

    Check your temperature gauge. Lean air/fuel ratios will always make an engine run hotter, and this is especially true for two-strokes. A two-stroke engine depends on a constant flow of fuel/oil to keeps things running cool and calm; a fuel deficit will also starve your engine of oil, which will generally cause overheating at anything above idle.

    2

    Listen for a backfire. Engines with lean air/fuel ratios often encounter a condition called "lean backfire" under sudden deceleration. The lean condition may introduce too much air for the engine to burn all of its fuel on the power stroke; suddenly closing the throttle will temporarily choke the engine, allowing the mixture in the cylinders to fully ignite. Unburned fuel in your exhaust will ignite once the burning fuel hits it, causing a backfire.

    3

    Feel for a loss in power when you open the throttle. Lean engines will typically run best when the throttle is shut and choking the engine. Once you open the throttle, the engine runs short of fuel and fails to detonate the mixture. The result is that the motor will actually lose rpm when you open the throttle and regain it when you let off.

    4

    Pull the spark plugs and take a look to "read" them. A lean-running engine will typically turn the spark plugs a white or very ashy color. Under really extreme conditions, excess heat in the combustion chamber may have caused detonation or pre-ignition, melting the plug or cracking the ceramic insulator. If you see little spots on your plugs but the engine is still running, then consider yourself lucky; those little spots are molten metal, signifying that your engine was on the verge of self-destruction when you pulled the plugs.

My 2002 GMC 2500HD Starter Won't Stop

The starter on a 2002 GMC 2500HD has a solenoid as an integral part of the starter. The main power to the starter solenoid comes directly from the positive terminal of the battery. When power is supplied from the ignition switch when in the start position, the solenoid is actuated, supplying power to the starter. There are only three possible causes for the starter to remain engaged. If the starter solenoid becomes stuck in the closed position; the ignition switch failing where the switch is stuck in the start position, or a stuck starter relay.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the positive battery wire to stop the starter, if you haven't already done this. Raise the vehicle with the floor jack and place the jack stands under the frame and lower the vehicle on the jack stands.

    2

    Touch the positive battery wire to its terminal momentarily to see if the starter engages. If it does, take the terminal back off the battery. Slide under the vehicle and pull the small diameter wire -- the ignition switch wire -- off the starter solenoid.

    3

    Touch the positive battery terminal to the battery positive post momentarily and see if it engages. If it does engage, the starter solenoid is malfunctioning -- replace the starter. If it does not engage, slide back under the truck and re-attach the small diameter wire.

    4

    Touch the positive terminal again for a second to see whether the starter engages. If the starter engages only when the small wire is attached, the starter relay is bad and needs to be replaced.

How to Troubleshoot a Motorcycle Gearbox

A motorcycle gearbox is essential for controlling the rpms through the power band. Depending on the size of your motorcycle engine, the power band controls the rate that your power increases until the maximum rpms are reached. If you have a two-stroke engine, the power band is narrow and requires a lot of gears in the gear box. If you have a four-stroke engine, the power band is much larger and requires a smaller number of gears in the gear box.

Instructions

    1

    Put on nonlatex gloves to protect your hands from grease and grime. Pull out the gear box on your motorcycle gently. If possible for your particular motorcycle model, pull both the shafts, drum and shift forks out together. If your motorcycle gear box won't allow you to do this, then remove the shafts that hold the shifter forks first, then remove the drum and the gear clusters.

    2

    Disassemble the gear shafts. Place the gear shafts in a cardboard or styrofoam egg carton to keep track of all the pieces. Mark your parts with the felt tip marker to organize the pieces so you will know how to put the gears back together. Mark them by numbers or by letters.

    3

    Examine the gears for broken teeth. Replace any gear that has teeth missing or bent, along with its mate. Clean out any debris stuck in the gear teeth by using an old toothbrush dipped in a small bucket of diesel fuel.

    4

    Inspect the "dogs" for any type of wear. These are gears that slide back and forth on the shafts. If you notice any nicks, lines or grooved marks, replace the dogs.

    5

    Examine the gear-box bearings for sufficient oil lubrication. If they are well-lubricated and appear fine, you don't have to replace them unless you have a new motorcycle. Add oil if it is low. You can never have too much oil in your gear box.

    6

    Reassemble your gear box, in the reverse order that you took it apart. Spin the gear shafts by hand to enable the shifting process with greater ease. Shift through all the gears. The gears may seem hard to shift through at first but that is normal as the oil works its way in between the teeth of the gears.

How to Check an ECM OBD

How to Check an ECM OBD

The engine control module, or ECM, serves as the brains of the average automobile. The ECM controls several aspects of the engine, including the fuel and air mixture, valve timing and ignition spark control. The ECM also stores a number of codes collected by various sensors in the on-board diagnostic system, or OBD, during the operation of the vehicle. You can read the trouble codes generated by the Check Engine light to track down and fix performance and emissions issues.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle on a level surface. Turn the ignition switch to the On position.

    2

    Locate the OBD connector under the drivers side of the dashboard. Unfold a paper clip and insert both ends into terminals A and B on the top right side of the connector. This location may vary depending on the type of OBD connector used in your vehicle.

    3

    Monitor the Check Engine light on the vehicles instrument panel. The light will flash once and briefly pause, then flash twice and pause, and continue the sequence three times. This is how the ECM displays a code 12, indicating that the vehicle is in diagnostic mode.

    4

    Monitor the Check Engine light for other diagnostic codes stored in the ECM. Consult your vehicles service manual for a list of codes used by that particular vehicles ECM.