Senin, 28 Februari 2011

How to Troubleshoot the Battery Light in a 2002 KIA Optima

How to Troubleshoot the Battery Light in a 2002 KIA Optima

If the battery light indicator is illuminated on your 2002 Kia, chances are that you have an issue with either the battery or the charging system. Sometimes this can be a simple fix, and other times you may need to replace the entire battery or alternator. You can troubleshoot a battery light with just a few tools. If you have just a bit of mechanical ability you can even solve the issue right at home.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the hood on your Kia and locate the battery. The battery is on the front left area of the engine compartment. Wiggle the battery cables to see if they are loose. If you have a loose cable, then that will cause the battery light to come on. Tighten the terminals with the end wrench set.

    2

    Look at the battery cable connections. If they are coated with corrosive material, that will cause the battery light to come on. Clean the terminals with the wire brush.

    3

    Plug your alternator tester into the cigarette lighter and start the vehicle. The tester has lights that will indicate if the alternator is charging the system properly. If it reads low, then you need to replace the alternator. If the tester reads good, then move on to the next step.

    4

    Attach the battery tester to the battery. One connection is black and one is red. Attach the red cable to the positive side of the battery and the black to the negative side of the battery. On the tester you will see a green area for good and a red area for bad. If you see that the tester is reading red, then you need a new battery or a charge. Chances are that the battery needs replacing.

How to Test the TP Sensor on a 1990 GMC Sierra

The throttle position sensor on the 1990 GMC Sierra has a three-wire connector. The left wire is the throttle position signal wire, and is dark blue. The middle gray one is the powertrain control module (PCM) positive wire, and to the right is the PCM ground wire, which is either black or orange. If the throttle position sensor malfunctions, you may notice a "dead" spot when you reach a certain speed -- a speed where you do a lot of driving. A dead spot is a point where the vehicle doesn't respond as you press on or let off the gas, until the gas pedal gets past that spot.

Instructions

    1

    Locate the throttle position sensor on your particular engine -- there are four different engines in the 1990 half-ton Sierra. Turn the key on, but leave the engine off. Stick the needle into the dark blue throttle position-signal wire.

    2

    Set the voltmeter to 20 volts. Touch the positive lead to the needle and the negative lead to a good ground. The reading should be less than 1 volt. Turn the key off.

    3

    Connect the positive-lead red wire and the black lead to a good ground. Turn the key on. Voltage should be below 100 millivolts. If so, turn the key off and disconnect the test leads.

    4

    Disconnect the throttle position sensor by pulling the tangs, or plastic clips, away from the connector and pulling the plug off the connector. Stick the red lead into the positive side of the connector (red wire) and the black onto a known good ground.

    5

    Turn the key on, but leave the engine off. The voltage should be about 5.0 volts. If not, replace the throttle position sensor.

Jumat, 25 Februari 2011

How to Detect Problems With a Steering Stabilizer

How to Detect Problems With a Steering Stabilizer

The steering stabilizer on your vehicle resembles a horizontally-mounted shock absorber. It is mounted to critical steering components, and is constantly working as the steering wheel is turned from left to right. The steering stabilizer dampens and smooths out the vibrations and oscillations which transmit from the road surface into the steering components. Without the steering stabilizer, the vehicle would feel as if the steering was loose or less stable, as the road vibrations would be more directly transmitted to the steering wheel.

Instructions

    1

    Locate the steering stabilizer, which is mounted under the front of the vehicle. It is attached to the steering components and is mounted horizontally.

    2

    Inspect the steering stabilizer for any road damage, such as dents or other deformations of the outer case. Also look for signs of oil leakage from around the shaft. This indicates that the inner seal is faulty, and the unit should be replaced.

    3

    Instruct a friend to turn the steering wheel from left to right while you observe the movement of the steering stabilizer. Any deviation from a smooth back and forth action indicates damage to the shaft or mounting attachments of the stabilizer.

    4

    Remove the steering shaft mounting bolts by turning them counterclockwise with the wrench. Pull the steering stabilizer from its mounts and inspect it carefully. If the shaft moves in and out with little or no resistance the inner seals have failed and the unit must be replaced.

Kamis, 24 Februari 2011

What Causes Dash Gauges to Go Off Intermittently While Driving in a 1998 Jeep Wrangler?

The 1998 Jeep TJ Wrangler is somewhat notorious for a problem where the airbag light will come on intermittently and then some or all of the dashboard gauges will stop working completely for several minutes. This issue causes the mileage on the odometer of these vehicles not to report correctly, the speedometer to stop working and even the gas gauge to stop reporting. Typically, the gauges will come back on within several minutes, or may come back on if the driver of the Jeep hits the horn or uses the blinkers. This is most commonly caused by a wiring problem. Jeep has issued a technical service bulletin about this problem, but has not recalled the vehicle.

Technical Service Bulletin 081599

    In May of 1999 Jeep issued a technical service bulletin addressing the dashboard cluster failure issue. The TSB states that "some vehicles may exhibit an erratic, intermittent cluster operation/intermittent air bag warning light." This service applies to several different year models of Cherokee and Wranglers. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has the technical service bulletin on this issue listed as number 606058.

Technical Service Bulletins

    A technical service bulletin is a bulletin that is issued from the manufacturer of a vehicle to dealerships and mechanics. The problem in the TSB has been recognized as a problem that occurs in multiple vehicles, but is not actually subject to a recall. This means that, while Jeep realizes that this is a consistent problem with this model of Wrangler and Cherokee, they will not pay for the repairs required to fix it and you will have to pay the dealership to rectify the problem.

Repair

    This issue is caused by a malfunctioning, defective connector in the dashboard cluster wiring. You can take your 1998 Wrangler to the Jeep dealership and provide them with the information regarding the technical service bulletin in order to have the full repair done. Your local Jeep dealership will have the necessary parts and tools to permanently correct this problem. Costs to repair the problem will vary by dealership.

Rabu, 23 Februari 2011

Ford Focus Car Problems

Ford Focus Car Problems

Since 1903, the Ford Motor Company has been producing vehicles. As of 2010, the company still remains one of the leading automobile manufacturers in the world. With constant technological advancements, even 100 years of manufacturing can't prevent mass problems and issues that often result in recalls. Many vehicles---such as the Ford Focus---have several problems that have forced Ford to issue multiple recalls.

Airbags

    Sometimes problems in manufacturing affect only a few vehicles, resulting in recalls of very low numbers. Such was the case for the 2008 Ford Focus, of which 45 units were issued for a recall in November 2007. Some vehicles failed the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 208, dealing with the airbag protection of the passenger. The malfunctioning airbags were not installed properly, which posed a potential risk of them not deploying in the event of a crash.

Latches

    Recalls can take place not over tens of thousands of vehicles, but over hundreds of thousands of vehicles. A problem with the 2005 Ford Focus and other vehicles resulted in more than 589,000 models being recalled. In selected vehicles, a corrosion build-up existed on the rear door latch, which could cause binding of the "pawl" area. This corrosion could prevent the pawl from catching the latch. Closing and opening the rear door can be a subsequent problem. This could potentially result in the door opening unintentionally while the vehicle is in motion.

Seats

    In 2000, 95,000 2001 Ford Focus models were recalled at the end of the year due to an issue with the reclining seat. The passenger seat of the Ford Focus is designed to fold down and become a load floor. On some malfunctioning vehicles, when the seat is folded down, a problem with the hinge pivot disengaging can occur. The problem is that when folding the seat back up, the seat has the potential to not re-engage, which can be dangerous in the event of a crash.

How to Find a Short in a Car

How to Find a Short in a Car

Electricity travels in a circle called a circuit. A short circuit, often called a short, is defined as one that allows the electricity to travel along a different path than the one originally intended. Often a short will cause a fuse to pop, especially when it is on the positive (hot) side of the circuit. A short should not be confused with an open, or a high-resistance circuit. This is when there is a break in either the ground side or the hot side of a circuit that no longer allows the electricity to complete its path. A short can be diagnosed in a few simple ways.

Instructions

    1

    Check the component itself. If more than one component is on the circuit of the blown fuse, unplug them one at a time, so you can determine which is the offending component. Then check that circuit first. Inspect the component for hot spots or burned wiring on or near the item. If any are found, the item itself is shorted and needs to be replaced.

    2

    Start at the affected component and work toward the power source, the battery or the fuse box. With the multimeter set on ohms, first check the ground side of the circuit by touching the ground side of the connector with one test lead, and a good engine ground with the other. Readings should be below 1.0, but ideally in the 0.09 to 0.2 ohm range.

    3

    Measure resistance from the hot side of the circuit to the first wire connector on that circuit. Look for the same values as above. Measure between each electrical connector until you reach the power source. The section where you suddenly have no continuity is the section where the short is located. When the section is identified, then break that section into smaller sections, measuring as you go. In the case of a short, usually you will find melted wire or broken insulation that will indicate where the failure is.

    4

    Measure voltage drop. Set the multimeter to volts, and check for voltage starting at the power source, and working your way toward the affected component, with the component unplugged, and a new fuse installed. Check voltage across every wire connector, with the black lead on one side of the connector, the red lead on the other. A good reading is less than .01 volts. Where the voltage on the meter jumps significantly, you have found the section of wiring where the short is. Look for burned or melted insulation or a broken wire touching an unwanted ground.

Selasa, 22 Februari 2011

How to Check for a Blown Engine

How to Check for a Blown Engine

When someone says he has a blown engine, what he usually means is the engine is dead or doesn't run. A more mechanically minded car owner will narrow it down and say that the rings are shot or the engine blew a gasket. Even the experts don't always agree on the definition of a blown engine. The only common denominator among the various diagnoses is that it's time to rebuild or replace the old motor.

Instructions

    1

    Look for large puddles of oil or antifreeze underneath the engine. Check for obvious signs of damage such as large cracks, a connecting rod protruding from the block or a hole in the oil pan from a rod or the crankshaft.

    2

    Pull the dipstick and inspect for water or antifreeze in the oil. Take off the radiator cap on a cold engine and look for the opposite -- a scum of oil floating on the antifreeze. Either can suggest a bad head gasket, but it also could mean there's a hole in the block between the oil galleys and water jacket or even a hole in the cylinder wall.

    3

    Turn the engine over using the starter. If the engine won't crank, turn it over by hand with a socket wrench on one of the engine pulleys. Listen for unusual noises as you do so. Suspect broken rods, pistons or other fatal problems if the engine makes grinding, metallic sounds as it turns or won't turn at all.

    4

    Remove all the spark plugs on an engine that will still turn over, especially if it turns over suspiciously fast. Check the compression. Extremely low compression in some or all of the cylinders is what many experts call a blown engine. Have a shop do a leak-down test to determine where and just how bad the damage is but be prepared for the likely news that it's time to rebuild the engine.

    5

    Connect an oil pressure tester to an engine that will still run, especially if it belches blue smoke or knocks. Suspect worn main and rod bearings if the pressure is low.

    6

    Total up the cost of fixing your blown engine before you give the go-ahead for repairs. Be brutally honest with yourself about the overall condition of the engine and the vehicle it's in. When replacing or rebuilding major engine components, one thing often leads to another. Make sure you know the total bill before you start.

Oil Pressure Gauge Problems in a V6 Fiero

The Fiero was Pontiac's attempt to enter the sports car market. The automobile was a two-door, two-seater sports car with the engine located in the back. The Pontiac division of General Motors began production of the Fiero in 1984, but the production run only lasted four years. The sports car did not meet sales expectations, and common problems with different components developed, such as the oil pressure gauge.

Oil Pressure Sensor

    Typically, the biggest problem with the oil pressure gauge in the V6 Fiero is the oil pressure sensor. The sensor was designed with a hole in the unit. Water tends to penetrate this hole and corrodes the electronics in the sensor. Once the sensor is corroded, the oil pressure gauge becomes erratic or fails completely.

Contacts

    Another problem on the oil pressure sensor is the contacts. The contacts also send partial power to the fuel pump in the Fiero and run parallel to the contacts of the fuel pump relay switch. When the fuel pump relay switch fails, the two contacts that control the oil pressure sensor cannot maintain all of the power for the fuel pump and oil pump combined. The contacts will melt or burn together, damaging the oil pressure sensor which, in turn, causes the oil pressure gauge to fail.

Fuse

    The oil pressure gauge, as do all the gauges on the instrument panel, has a fuse that protects the gauge from power surges. The fuse will burn out if a sudden surge of power charges through the electrical wire that runs to the oil pressure gauge. Once the fuse is blown, the oil pressure gauge quits working. A damaged wire or short-circuit can also cause the fuse for the oil pressure gauge to blow.

Oil Pressure Sending Unit

    One unique problem that plagues the Fiero is the oil pressure sending unit. It seems the sender for each model-year came from different manufacturers out of Taiwan. Replacing a oil pressure sending unit with one from a different model-year will cause the oil pressure gauge to work erratically or not at all. Make sure you replace the sender with the same model-year of sending unit. If that does not work, get a sender off an older Fiero of the same model-year.

How to Synchronize the Windows on a Mercedes

How to Synchronize the Windows on a Mercedes

Some Mercedes-Benz automobiles come equipped with electronically controlled, convenience closing windows. This feature allows the side windows to be closed simultaneously with the sunroof and some versions of roller sun blinds, at the same time as the vehicle is locked. Problems with these windows on a Mercedes can include the windows becoming unsynchronized, where a side window opens slightly after being manually closed or a side window fails to close automatically. Windows can be resynchronized by following a simple procedure.

Instructions

    1

    Close all of the doors of the Mercedes and turn the SmartKey to the first click in the ignition cylinder.

    2

    Pull on the door window switch that controls the window that either reopened or did not close at all. Pull the switch until the window is closed and then hold the switch for one second. Check that all of the windows are closed properly.

    3

    Pull the switch again if the side window reopens a crack. Hold the switch for one second again after the window closes. Repeat the automatic locking sequence again and verify that all of the windows have closed properly and have not reopened.

Senin, 21 Februari 2011

What Codes Mean on a Camaro

The codes on a Camaro appear only when something is wrong with the car. By plugging a diagnostic computer into the proper port, usually located on the passenger side of the vehicle, you can diagnose what is wrong. The diagnostic device queries the computer that regulates the car. This computer loads the codes that are appearing in it to the diagnostic computer's display. The owner's manual of the car will contain a description of what each numbered code means.

Code 33 & 34

    Codes 33 and 34 mean two different things for your MAP (manifold absolute pressure) sensor. Code 33 means that the MAP sensor is functioning below its necessary operation. Usually this code appears when the MAP sensor is beginning to fail. Code 34 appears when the MAP sensor is functioning at too high a level, which will quickly burn out the sensor, requiring its replacement for fuel regulation. On occasion, these codes turn up when the gas cap has been left off the car, cranked and driven. Without the gas cap on the car, it is difficult for the MAP sensor to gauge the correct amount of vacuum to use. If this code comes up, make certain that your gas cap is on all the way, clear the codes and try running them again. If the same code comes up again, examine your MAP sensor.

Code 51

    Code 51 is usually considered to be a user error code. This means that the diagnostic computer is not plugged all the way into the slot. Code 51 may also appear as Code 0 on diagnostic computers made before 1999. Unplug the diagnostic computer, clear the codes and plug it in again. If it continues to get errors like this, take it to a service desk. This code may also appear if the diagnostic computer cannot read the car's computer. If the vehicle will not crank, have the computer examined to be certain that the problem is not the car's computer rather than the diagnostic machine.

Code 13

    Code 13 appears when the oxygen sensor is beginning to have problems. Cars may chug or have problems "breathing." If the air filter has not been cleaned for a long time or not at all, have it cleaned. Clear the codes on the machine and see whether that fixes the problem. If it does not, the car should be examined for a bad oxygen sensor.

Minggu, 20 Februari 2011

Problems With a Radiator Cooling Fan

The radiator cooling fan is an essential part of your vehicle's cooling system. The fan is used to keep the engine cool when the vehicle is not traveling at high enough speeds to do it with natural air flow. Overheating can cause a number of serious engine problems, so your vehicle's cooling system always needs to be in the best working condition possible to help avoid expensive repairs.

Faulty Fan Clutch

    The fan clutch is a device that adjusts the fan's speed in relation to the engine's speed and cooling needs. The fan clutch works by engaging and disengaging the vehicle's fan as determined by engine temperature readings through use of a thermostat. A malfunctioning fan clutch can cause the fan not to turn on when it is needed and lead to engine overheating.

Missing Fan Shroud

    According to AA1Car, a missing fan shroud can reduce your radiator fan's effectiveness by up to 50 percent, which can lead to overheating on hot days or when the engine is under more strain than usual. The fan shroud serves double duty by protecting the fan and directs the airflow. When the amount of airflow the cooling system receives from the fan is reduced, the effectiveness of the cooling system is often significantly reduced as well.

Wiring and Fuses

    Every part of your vehicle operates using power generated from the battery and alternator. If your fan is not receiving enough power because of a problem in the wiring, a loose connection somewhere or a bad fuse, your fan may not operate or may only operate intermittently. A problem in your vehicle's electrical system can be relatively minor and simple to repair, but if left undetected or not attended to properly, it can cause serious problems with your vehicle because of the possibility of overheating.

Overheating

    If the fan is not cooling properly, for whatever reason, the vehicle will overheat. This will occur if there are physical problems with the fan or the fan shroud, as well as if there are other problems within the cooling system. Overheating can be caused by improper temperature readings from the thermostat, faulty wiring in the cooling system, a clogged radiator not allowing coolant to flow freely through the cooling system and a variety of other issues. Proper monitoring of your vehicle's engine temperature and coolant levels can help reduce or eliminate overheating problems and help you determine what problems exist. Get your vehicle repaired before the problem escalates.

Sabtu, 19 Februari 2011

How to Check for P Codes on a 2005 Ford Explorer

How to Check for P Codes on a 2005 Ford Explorer

If you are checking for P codes in a 2005 Ford Explorer, you are dealing with the second generation of On-Board Diagnostic (OBD-II) codes. Ford codes predating 1996 are two- and three-digit numbers. After the widespread implementation of OBD-II in all major makes and models, diagnostics became standardized. Trouble codes begin with a letter specifying the location of the problem. "P" stands for power train and encompasses most of the engine. For example, P1171 is the code for "Rotor Sensor Fault." Accessing these codes is straightforward, provided you have the right hardware.

Instructions

    1

    Open your scanner's manual to the descriptions and definition of power train codes and place a bookmark there.

    2

    Open the driver's-side door of your vehicle and insert the key into the ignition. Leave it unturned and the vehicle "Off." Place the scanner's manual on the driver's seat.

    3

    Connect your scanner to the Explorer's data link connection, which is just above the parking brake. It will be uncovered and easy to access. You can identify it easily, as it has 16 prong receptors. Your scanner's cable should also easily fit into it.

    4

    Start the Explorer's engine. What you do next depends on the brand and type of scanner you are using. Consult your manual beforehand. Some scanners will automatically turn themselves on and retrieve trouble codes, while some require you to turn them on and issue a "read" command.

    5

    Read the codes on the screen. If you have multiple reported trouble codes, scroll through those and look for the ones beginning with the letter "P."

    6

    Consult the bookmarked manual you left in the driver's seat. You should be able to find a simple description of the what the code means. If you cannot find the code in your manual, your code may be one of Ford's supplemental power train codes. These are easily found online, archived at third-party websites not affiliated with Ford. Once you have consulted the code definition, you can make a decision on whether you will attempt a fix yourself or drive the Explorer to a Ford-approved repair shop.

Jumat, 18 Februari 2011

Pontiac Vibe Engine Problems

Pontiac Vibe Engine Problems

Introduced in 2003, the Pontiac Vibe was a hatchback car available in automatic and manual transmission. Production of the Vibe ceased in 2009, when General Motors discontinued the Pontiac brand. Despite being discontinued, Vibe owners and used-Vibe buyers should be aware of potential engine problems.

Baffle Plate

    Reviews indicate that the baffle plate, located under the oil fill hole of 2003 to 2004 Pontiac Vibe vehicles may be damaged from the oil fill nozzles used at some quick-lube stations. A damaged baffle can result in engine noise and the check-engine light going on. A baffle prevents oil from dripping on the valve covers.

PCM Problems

    Reviews indicate that 2005 to 2008 Vibe models may experience engine stalling due to a faulty PCM (powertrain control module). After running normally, the Vibe's engine may stall and not restart. Located in the engine, the PCM is a computer that controls the engine's parts and functions. There was an official recall issued on certain affected PCMs on 2005 to 2008 Vibe vehicles. A GM dealer can determine whether your unit is on the recall.

Baffle Repair

    As of 2011, the cost of a 2003 Pontiac Vibe baffle plate is approximately $40, plus labor. Failing to fix the baffle plate can result in increased engine noise and oil leaking.

PCM Alternative

    If your Vibe was not listed on the recall list, there are alternatives. If purchased within the past three years, your Vibe may still be covered under the basic three-year/36,000-mile warranty. Despite the discontinuation of Pontiac, your warranty will still be honored by GM. If your Vibe is no longer under the factory warranty, the estimated repair cost for a new PCM is approximately $500 for parts and labor (as of 2011).

Bad Tire Wear With the Front-Wheel-Drive on a 1995 Cutlass Supreme

Bad Tire Wear With the Front-Wheel-Drive on a 1995 Cutlass Supreme

Tire wear is to a vehicle's suspension condition what spark plugs are to an engine and what blood sugar is to a diabetic; no matter what kind of car you have, tire wear patterns are smoking guns that indicate everything that might have gone wrong with tire settings, from inflation pressures to alignment settings. Reading tire wear is something of an art, but it's a vital one if you want to diagnose the problem that caused the wear in the first place.

Center and Double-Edge Wear

    If your tires are excessively worn in the center, then the outer edges of the tread aren't touching terra firma. This type of wear almost always comes from overinflation, which causes the tire tread to balloon out and push the center downward. Also called "center cupping," wear at both tire edges tells you that the center of the tire is arching up instead of laying flat on the road. As you might expect, center cupping is the result of chronic underinflation.

Wear on One Side

    Tires excessively worn on one side -- generally the inside -- are a result of improper camber settings. Camber is the degree to which your wheels tilt either inward at the top or outward; tire wear on the inside indicates excessive inward lean, while outer wear indicates outward lean. This is a common wear pattern for lowered vehicles with MacPhereson strut suspension, as lowering causes the wheels to tilt inward.

Cupping or Scalloping

    Scalloping is similar to camber-indicating edge wear, but manifests as a ragged, wavy or cupped pattern in the wear, instead of a smooth absence of tread. Cupping almost always results from broken, bent or loose suspension components. Ball joints, bearings, struts, bushings and control arms are all suspect here. Chronically out-of-balance wheels will sometimes cause scalloping, but it's pretty rare.

Feathering

    This phenomena is hard to describe, unless you've seen it in person, but imagine tilting the tire to one side and dragging it sideways down the road. Feathering starts as edge wear, but progresses all the way to the center of the tire tread. The tread on the less-worn side may have a visibly slant to it, that being thicker on the non-worn side than the worn side. The tire looks like it's been dragged sideways because it has; incorrect toe-in or toe-out settings -- the front of the tires point either toward or away from each other -- are the usual culprit, but worn bushings and suspension components that cause a change in toe will also contribute to feathering.

Chunking

    This is an entirely different phenomena than standard tire wear; if you see it, then consider that last high-speed blast of yours the luckiest day of your life. Tires create friction when they roll down the road, and that friction creates heat. That heat softens and weakens the rubber compounds; this damage, combined with centrifugal force, causes chunks of rubber to fly off of the tire tread and leaves it pitted and possibly missing entire tread blocks. This kind of damage is common for off-road tires used on heavy vehicles that see a lot of interstate miles, but it's also a probability when using tires not rated for the car's top speed. Chunking is what happens right before a tire disintegrates at high speed; consider yourself extremely lucky to have stopped when you did.

Troubleshooting a Check Engine Light on 2000 Ford Focus

Troubleshooting a Check Engine Light on 2000 Ford Focus

The check engine light on all variants of the 2000 Ford Escort turns on when the vehicle's onboard diagnostics detect an out-of-specification sensor reading. If the light is on but not blinking, the emissions are beyond 1 1/2 times the normal readings, indicating that the driver should diagnose and repair the problem as soon as reasonably possible. If the light is flashing, the onboard computer is indicating a problem requiring immediate attention. Trouble codes for all 2000 Ford Escorts are retrievable from the onboard computer.

Instructions

    1

    Turn off the Ford Focus engine and remove the key from the ignition.

    2

    Attach the OBD-II tool's cable to the OBD-II port. The 16-pin connection is under the driver's dash, at the far left near the door.

    3

    Initialize or turn on the OBD-II reader. If necessary, indicate the manufacturer of the vehicle as "Ford." Place the key in the ignition and turn it to the "Start" position but do not turn on the vehicle.

    4

    Allow the data to transfer to the code reader. Monitor the reader and follow any on-screen instructions required to retrieve the trouble codes from the onboard computer. Specific steps vary by device. Consult the owner's manual, if necessary, for exact steps.

    5

    Read any trouble codes and information displayed on the reader. Some OBD-II scan tools provide both the code and diagnostic information. Others display only the code, requiring you to use the owner's manual or access the OBD website for interpretation.

Kamis, 17 Februari 2011

Can a Faulty Fuel Pump Cause Excessive Gas Usage?

Can a Faulty Fuel Pump Cause Excessive Gas Usage?

The fuel pump, like the rest of the fueling system, is a fairly simple device. Fuel pump failures almost always result in a drop in fuel pressure, which may affect fuel economy: just not the way you think. If you suspect your fuel system of costing you dollars at the pump, then consider every aspect of it before sinking your money into a new pump.

Engine Basics

    At its core, an engine is just a big chemical conversion device. It uses the chemical energy stored in fuel to create pressure and heat, which pushes on the pistons to create mechanical energy. This conversion event happens via combustion, which is what happens when you combine fuel and oxygen in just the right proportions and ignite it. Gasoline engines are oxygen limited, meaning that they're designed to run out of air before they do fuel. Bear this in mind as you think about what the fuel pump does.

Fuel Systems

    A fuel pump doesn't just move the fuel, as its name indicates: It pressurizes the fuel line. Carbureted applications rarely need more than about 10 psi of fuel pressure, owing to the fact that the fuel pressure itself only feeds into a fuel reservoir in the carburetor. Fuel-injected engines, though, require far higher pressures to shove fuel through the tiny orifice in the injector. Low fuel pressure will reduce the amount of fuel going through, while higher fuel pressures will increase it to a point.

Rich and Lean Conditions

    All else being equal, only a fuel-rich condition will cause your engine to drop in fuel economy. A rich condition happens when there's more fuel going through the engine than the oxygen required to burn it. A drop in fuel pressure -- via a malfunctioning pump or clogged filters -- would starve the engine of fuel, causing a lean or fuel-poor condition. Fuel pump failures typically come in one of two varieties: Either the motor fails or the pump vanes wear out. In both cases, you're looking at a drop in fuel pressure and fuel starvation.

Probable Causes

    While fuel pumps do tend to fluctuate in pressure before they fail, rarely will you find the pressure spike above the factory setting. So, that leaves not the fuel pump, but the fuel pump pressure regulator as the most likely suspect here. A bad pressure regulator or failing fuel pressure sensor may allow the pump to run at a higher psi than the factory setting. If fuel pressure runs consistently high, the injectors will pump slightly more fuel through than they should. This could, hypothetically, result in a drop in fuel economy if the computer doesn't have a program to compensate for the increased fuel pressure.

Other Considerations

    While fuel pump failures won't often cause a drop in fuel economy, different computers have different methods of dealing with them. For instance, if a computer detects a rapid drop in system pressure, it may open the injectors more to compensate. If the fuel pressure fluctuates back up to normal with the injectors open farther, more fuel goes in and the engine goes rich. Since it takes more time for the gas to go through the engine than it does for the pressure sensor to react, such pressure fluctuation could cause a net increase in fuel-to-air ratio and a drop in fuel economy. This situation is fairly unlikely, but not impossible depending upon your particular system.

Rabu, 16 Februari 2011

Troubleshooting a Cadillac Fuel Pump

Troubleshooting a Cadillac Fuel Pump

With a fuel pump issue, you could get stuck out on the road. The fuel pump has the job of pumping the fuel to the carburetor which sends it to the cylinders for firing. If you are having a problem with your fuel pump, you can try to troubleshoot it right in your driveway with the help of a friend. Be prepared to smell a bit like gasoline before the process is finished.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood of your Cadillac. Have your friend sit in the driver's seat and be ready for your directions.

    2

    Find the fuel pump. You will find it on the lower driver's side of the engine; it has 2 fuel lines attached to it. One line is inlet of fuel from the fuel tank and the other is exit from the fuel pump to the carburetor.

    3

    Remove the exit fuel line from the fuel pump with the screwdriver set. The fuel line is held on by a hose clamp. Turn the screw of the hose clamp counterclockwise to remove. Have your container there to catch any fuel that escapes from the system.

    4

    Direct your friend to turn the key to the start position, on and off quickly. If you do not see fuel from the fuel filter, then remove the inlet fuel line the same way you did the exit line. If you have fuel, you need to replace the fuel pump.

How to Use Your Laptop As an Obdii Scan Tool

You can interface your laptop with your OBDii and use it to monitor engine performance and to diagnose engine issues. Using a laptop instead of a handheld programmer is a benefit if you own a garage and you need to keep records of your diagnosis for your customers. It is also a benefit of you want to keep records of your personal vehicle. For example, if you have a performance engine in your car, you can maintain records of engine performance after each modification.

Instructions

    1

    Download the necessary software for your scanner from the website or install the software from the disc supplied with the new scanner.

    2

    Connect the scanner to the USB port on your laptop. Most new scanners use USB2.0 technology. Plug the other end of the cable into the OBDii port on your car.

    3

    Launch the OBDii program on your computer and then turn your car to the "auxiliary" position. Depending on what you want to accomplish with your OBDii software, you might be prompted by the computer to turn the engine completely on.

Selasa, 15 Februari 2011

How to Check Shock or Strut Wear

How to Check Shock or Strut Wear

Worn shocks and struts can cause a car to drive erratically and decrease the driver's ability to control the car when cornering. Diagnosing worn struts or shocks can be tricky if you are not trained. However, there are several tests you can complete on your own to help you determine if you should take your car to an authorized repair center to have your shocks or struts replaced.

Instructions

    1

    Drive the car in question. Take note of the following situations. Does the nose of the car drip down drastically when you press on the brakes? Does the rear of the car dip down when you step on gas? Does the vehicle feel rough when you ride over rough terrain? Does the front corner of the car dive down when you turn corners? Do you hear rattling or metal clanging together? If you say yes to any of these situations, it could indicate worn shocks or struts.

    2

    Place the car on flat ground and measure the height of all four corners at the highest point in the wheel well. Locate the ride height measurements in your owner's manual. Any corner of the car measuring under the specified ride height could indicate a worn shock or strut.

    3

    Complete a bounce test. Push down on the front of the car and then let go of it. Do the same with the back of the car. If the front or back of the car gyrates more than twice, it could indicate worn shocks or struts.

    4

    Turn the wheels on your car to one side and inspect the shock or strut for excessive rust. Most shocks are filled with gas and if you see excessive rust, it can indicate the gas has leaked out.

What Can Make a Motor Throw a Rod?

What Can Make a Motor Throw a Rod?

Back in the day, "throwing a rod" in an automobile engine was far more common than now. In modern engines that are properly maintained and not abused, a thrown piston rod in normal driving conditions has become extremely uncommon. Nevertheless, when it happens, it's a catastrophic event that usually requires a major overhaul, if not an entirely new engine. A piston rod is "thrown" when it separates from its connection point, whether at the piston pin at the top of the rod or at the bottom of the rod where the rod bearing attaches to the crankshaft. Conditions leading to a thrown rod aren't subtle or multifaceted. In most cases, the causes of a thrown rod are limited to a few major failures.

Oil Pressure

    There are only two reasons why an engine would have oil pressure low enough to throw a rod. Excessive wear in very high-mileage vehicles can systemically lower oil pressure enough to cause a rod bearing to spin out of its bearing cap on the crankshaft due to friction from lack of lubrication. When this happens, the rod detaches from the crankshaft and, depending on whether it occurs on the upstroke or downstroke, either smashes the liberated piston into the cylinder head or knocks a hole in the engine block. The other reason for low oil pressure is, well, no oil in the crankcase. A warning light on the dashboard should let you know when things get that desperate. An oil pressure gauge to give you a continuous readout is a better early warning device. Checking your oil regularly--even better.

Revved Out

    Over-revving an engine beyond its engineered limits can cause the rod, bearing or wrist pin to fail from excessive stress and heat. This is difficult to do in the average vehicle with standard factory setup because most have "rev limiters" to prevent it. But engines modified for competition or even just high-performance street operation are capable of putting the rpm's far enough into the red for long enough to spontaneously shed internal components.

Valve Failure

    A broken intake or exhaust valve may drop into the piston cylinder. If the engine continues to run, the loose valve wreaks mechanical havoc in the cylinder, pulverizing the head of the piston and resulting in a thrown rod from breakage at the wrist pin.

Nuts and Bolts

    Connecting rod bearings that attach the piston rod to the crankcase are enclosed in caps secured with highly-torqued nuts and bolts. Conceivably, any nut and bolt screwed together can loosen with age or if they aren't properly tightened to begin with. It's definitely not the first thing to suspect, but once in a while, those nuts work loose and release the bearing which then throws the rod. It can also happen if someone rebuilding an engine opts to reuse the previous bearing cap bolts and nuts which have already been overstressed by torquing and age. New rod bearings should always be installed with new hardware.

Why Does My 2004 Envoy Hesitate Under a Load?

The Envoy originally started out as a high-end option package on the GMC Jimmy, but outlived its genetic predecessor and went on to become its own model in 1998. Like its counterpart trucks from Chevrolet, Oldsmobile, Buick and Isuzu, the GMC Envoy is still chock-full of electronic components rife with opportunity for failure. That's where most of these kinds of failures come from, which makes fixing them potentially inexpensive if you spend the time in diagnosis.

Control Computer

    Your truck's powertrain control module is its brain, so any kind of malfunction here is going to wreak havoc on everything it controls. Odds are good that the PCM is fine, particularly if the hesitation only happens under load and you're not experiencing any other problems, but you may want to check it for loose connections. Loose connections and corrosion aren't uncommon, particularly in humid environments.

Oxygen and CPS Sensors

    A rear O2 sensor malfunction typically won't cause hesitation under load as it only monitors catalytic converter function, but a code indicating rear O2 malfunction is something to watch for. A clogged converter keeps exhaust trapped in the engine, which can momentarily kill power. Front O2 sensor malfunctions are a different animal altogether. Acceleration and high-load conditions are transitional periods where the engine has to perform at its optimal condition, while things inside change very quickly. A slightly slow or malfunctioning O2 sensor will typically manifest under load before it does at any other time. A bad crankshaft or camshaft position sensor may initially manifest as hesitation, but will almost certainly throw a check engine light with a specific code for that sensor.

Intake Issues

    A maladjusted or malfunctioning throttle position sensor, dirty or malfunctioning mass-airflow sensor or bad manifold air pressure sensor will manifest with many of the same symptoms as a bad O2 sensor, and for the same reasons. In the same way that the O2 sensor monitors the gases coming out of your engine, these sensors keep an eye on the air that's going in. If you've recently disconnected the battery and suddenly developed a hesitation problem, you might want to consider cleaning the throttle body. The Envoy uses an electronic throttle body that will adjust to minor obstructions built up over time. Disconnecting the battery will cause your computer to forget that the obstruction is there, which will result in an airflow discrepancy and hesitation.

Dirty Filters and Random Stuff

    Your Envoy uses several different kinds of filters, and all can cause hesitation under load, if badly clogged. It uses a "sock" filter around the fuel pump, another fuel filter in the line and another small screen inside each injector. All of these can cause a momentary drop in fuel pressure resulting in hesitation. A single, slightly clogged injector won't typically cause hesitation, but several dirty screens will. Check the air filter, particularly if it's ever gotten wet. Vacuum leaks typically manifest as a momentary hesitation under load, particularly if they're small enough that the computer can compensate for them after the air/fuel ratio runs lean.

Senin, 14 Februari 2011

My 2003 Corolla Won't Start

My 2003 Corolla Won't Start

If your 2003 Corolla won't start, it is most likely facing one of the more common engine-start problems. For a gasoline vehicle to start, it must have a battery with enough charge, enough fuel in the engine cylinders, enough spark to fire the air and fuel, engine valves that open and close at the right time and proper compression. If you're Corolla won't start, one of these factors is probably missing.

Instructions

Check the Battery with a Voltage Meter

    1

    Put on eye protection and long sleeves. Remove all jewelry.

    2

    Pop the hood of the car.

    3

    Place the voltage meter near the vehicle.

    4

    Remove the positive terminal protective cover. This comes off in the 2003 Toyota Corolla with no external hardware.

    5

    Place the positive side meter lead to the positive side of the battery. The positive side is red.

    6

    Place the negative side meter lead to the negative side of the battery. The negative side is black.

    7

    Assess the voltage. Your car should read between 12.5 and 12.8 volts if it is not running and has not been recently driven. If your car registers less voltage, you may need to replace the battery.

Check the Battery without a Voltage Meter

    8

    Turn the key in the ignition. Confirm that you hear a clicking noise.

    9

    Leave the engine off. Turn the windshield wipers on.

    10

    Assess whether the windshield wipers are moving at a normal or sluggish pace. The battery controls the windshield wipers, so if the battery is dead or dying, the wipers will either move very slowly or not at all.

    11

    Check the dashboard lights. Confirm that they are dimmer than necessary. The battery also controls these lights.

    12

    Jump the car with jumper cables, a working vehicle and an assistant. Let it run for 30 to 45 minutes to charge the battery. If your car battery is more than four years old, you may need to replace it. Charging it will not last over the long term.

Key Won't Turn in the Ignition

    13

    Turn the wheel gently to the left and right.

    14

    Jiggle the key in the ignition as you would in a lock that is stuck. Perform step one and two simultaneously.

    15

    Repeat step one and two with a spare key. The key might be worn and no longer fit properly in the lock mechanism.

No "Check Engine" Light

    16

    Turn the key in the ignition.

    17

    Verify that the "Check Engine" light does not appear on the dashboard.

    18

    Take your Corolla to a mechanic. The absence of the "Check Engine" light may mean that there is no power getting to the engine computer. A wire or a fuse that cannot be easily found may need to be repaired.

How to Test a 92 Acura Integra Ignition Coil

The 1992 Acura Integra was available in several submodels: the GS, LS and RS coupes and sedans, and the GS-R coupe. The base engine was a 1.8-liter, in-line four-cylinder. The GS-R was equipped with a 1.7-liter, VTEC in-line four-cylinder. Both engines use the same testing procedures for the ignition coil. The 1992 Integra engines were equipped with a distributor-type ignition system, with an ignition coil built into the distributor. Testing the distributor is done two ways to ensure positive resistance between the primary winding and secondary winding.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood and set the hood prop. Disconnect the positive, then the negative battery cables from the battery, using a ratchet and socket. Tuck the cables to the side of the battery so there is no contact during this project.

    2

    Make a straight mark between the distributor cap and the distributor housing with a white crayon. Remove the two mounting screws on the distributor cap with a Phillips driver, from the passenger side of the upper engine. Pull the distributor cap off the engine without disconnecting the ignition wires from the cap. Set the cap on the upper engine. The ignition coil is in the distributor housing.

    3

    Remove the screws that hold down the black and yellow wire to post A+, and the white and blue wire to post B-. Remove the wires from the ignition coil.

    4

    Set your multimeter to the ohms setting. Place the red probe from the multimeter onto the A+ post, which held the black and yellow wire. Place the black probe from the meter onto the B- post, which held the white and blue wire. The measurement of resistance between these two posts is the primary winding measurement; it should be between 0.6 to 0.8 ohms.

    5

    Move the black probe from the meter to the secondary winding post, the ignition tower that protrudes outward from the coil. Keep the red probe on the A+ post. The measurement of resistance for this secondary winding should be between 12,800 and 19,200 ohms. If either the primary or secondary winding measurement is not within the given specifications, replace the ignition coil.

    6

    Install the black and yellow wire onto the A+ post and tighten the screw snug. Install the white and blue wire onto the B- post and tighten that screw snug.

    7

    Install the distributor cap onto the distributor housing, lining up the white mark you made during removal. Tighten the distributor cap screws snug with the Phillips screwdriver.

    8

    Install the negative, then the positive battery cable and tighten them snug with a ratchet and socket.

How to Troubleshoot a 1991 Dodge Dakota Truck

How to Troubleshoot a 1991 Dodge Dakota Truck

The 1991 Dodge Dakota truck was manufactured in a 2.5 liter L4, 3.9 liter V6 and a 5.2 liter V8. The mid-size trucks were manufactured in two and four-wheel drive models and the V8 model offered an extended cab. The 1991 models were manufactured before the introduction of vehicle computer systems and sensors. Troubleshooting the Dakota requires basic mechanical knowledge and the ability to observe changes in your truck's performance.

Instructions

    1

    Turn the key and attempt to start the vehicle. If the engine is dead, test the electronics and lights for power. If the power is weak or nonexistent, attach jumper cables to a running vehicle and to the starting battery. Start the vehicle. If the battery does not hold the charge, replace it with a new one.

    2

    If the truck has a functioning battery but continues to lose power, use a voltage meter to test the alternator. If the alternator is experiencing a major voltage drop, it must be replaced. The malfunctioning alternator will continue to drain the power and the charge-discharge cycles eventually will ruin the battery.

    3

    If the battery and alternator are supplying full power to the truck but the engine will not crank, the starter may be broken. Hit the starter with a hammer to unlock the teeth and attempt to start. If the problem persists, remove the two starter bolts with a socket wrench and have the starter tested at an automotive center.

    4

    Drive the truck and vary your speed. If the engine power surges and sputters, the fuel pump is failing. If the truck is intermittently difficult to turn, the power steering pump is failing. Both of these issues must be addressed immediately.

    5

    Drive the truck on a smooth surface at variable speeds to test the transmission. Listen for grinding and popping sounds when the transmission shifts. Also, feel for a pause and jolt while shifting. Have the transmission serviced for these issues.

Minggu, 13 Februari 2011

What Does It Mean When a Car Goes Into Limp Mode?

What Does It Mean When a Car Goes Into Limp Mode?

In the early 1980s, computerized vehicle control started with the emissions system, but soon computer use in vehicles became more prevalant. Today, computers control the heating and air-conditioning systems, and even control most of the other convenience features in the vehicle, such as lighting and power windows. When the vehicle systems do not work correctly, the computers can institute default programming, called limp mode.

Malfunction

    When a car enters limp mode, one of the vehicle control modules, or computers, has detected a problem with its logic. A reading from a sensor or other input is not correct, and the computer knows that the readings are outside of the normal ranges. The module cannot process the correct outputs based on the data that it has to work with. When this happens, the vehicle's computers will set a trouble code, and turn on a check engine or other malfunction indicator light.

Making it Home

    If the faulty data is in a major vehicle system, such as the fuel delivery or ignition system, or other engine or body controls, the computer will often enter its limp mode. This is designed to allow you to at least get the vehicle to safety, such as off a busy street to a nearby parking lot. In some cases, you may be able to drive the vehicle home or to a repair facility, although the vehicle may drive slower than normal or behave erratically.

Transmission Limp Mode

    Modern vehicle transmissions consist of mechanical and electronic systems, with the electronic systems responsible for much of its operation. When a vehicle enters limp mode due to a transmission concern, it will behave differently depending on the failure. The vehicle may only operate in one or two gears, which will substantially limit the acceleration and top speed performance. In some cases, the transmission control module will direct maximum fluid pressure to clutch packs and other components. This will result in extremely hard shifts. While this may feel like it is damaging the transmission, it is intended to protect the transmission from failures due to low fluid pressure.

Correcting the Condition

    If your vehicle is in limp mode, when you get to safety you may be able to shut the vehicle off and wait a few minutes, and then start the vehicle again. Sometimes, this will reset the electronic controls, restoring valid data. You should still have your vehicle checked as soon as possible, because the original fault may still be present. If the vehicle does not reset, you will need to take the vehicle to a repair facility for proper diagnosis and repair.

When Not to Drive

    A check engine light that is on steady means that you need to have the vehicle repaired soon, but it is still OK to drive. If the check engine light is flashing, you should not drive the vehicle. The flashing check engine light means that a misfire is present in the ignition system, and your vehicle exhaust could be pushing unburned fuel into the exhaust. This can cause a problem with the vehicle's catalytic converters, which is a very expensive repair. If the anti-lock brake system warning light or air bag warning light is on, be aware that these safety systems are inactive and will not work in an emergency.

How to Troubleshoot a 1996 Dodge Intrepid 3.5L V6 Throttle Position Sensor

How to Troubleshoot a 1996 Dodge Intrepid 3.5L V6 Throttle Position Sensor

The throttle position sensor (TPS) in your 1996 Dodge Intrepid 3.5L V6 engine helps the computer determine the amount of fuel to provide the cylinders with, depending on engine load. So a failing TPS in your Intrepid can affect fuel injection, timing and, consequently, engine performance. However, problems in other circuits or components may lead you to blame the TPS in your Dodge. To avoid unnecessary repairs, troubleshoot the sensor at home to confirm the component state of operation and decide whether you need to replace it.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood and locate the TPS mounted on one side of the throttle body. The throttle body connects to the air cleaner assembly, which contains the air filter, and is mounted on the intake manifold. Your Dodge TPS is a small box, about 2 inches in diameter, with rounded corners and an electrical connector on one side. Two small screws secure the TPS to the throttle body.

    2

    Inspect the connector at the TPS and make sure the harness wires are securely connected. Check for loose, damaged or rusted wires and connectors. These are common failures for electrical components. Remove dust, oil and rust from the connections with electrical contact cleaner, if necessary.

    3

    Back probe the voltage supply to the TPS from the computer by connecting the red probe of your 10 megohm digital multimeter to the violet wire in the connector harness and the black probe of your meter to the black wire in the connector harness.

    4

    Set your multimeter to the low range of the Direct Volt scale so that you can read up to 5 volts. Ask an assistant to turn the ignition switch to the "On" position but do not start the engine. Turn your multimeter on. The display on your meter should read 5 volts. Otherwise, your TPS is not getting voltage from the computer and you should check that part of the circuit. Turn off the ignition switch and your digital meter.

    5

    Leave the black probe on your meter connected to the black wire on the TPS harness connector wire. Switch the red probe of your meter to the orange wire at the connector, which is the middle wire.

    6

    Ask your assistant to turn the ignition switch to the "On" position and turn on your meter. This time, the display on your meter should read around 0.6 volts. Ask your assistant to gradually push the accelerator pedal to the floor. The voltage reading on your digital meter should smoothly increase to around 4.5 volts and remain steady as your assistant holds the pedal to the floor. Turn off your digital meter and the ignition switch on your Dodge Intrepid.

    7

    Replace the TPS if you obtained different voltage readings from those specified in the previous step.

Sabtu, 12 Februari 2011

Signs That a Thermostat Is Bad

Signs That a Thermostat Is Bad

A bad thermostat can mean serious problems for your car. If your engine gets too hot or runs too cold for too long a time, it can permanently damage your vehicle and cost you hundreds of dollars in repairs. There are several signs and symptoms you should look for if you think your vehicle's thermostat is not functioning correctly.

Overheating

    In the event your vehicle's thermostat becomes stuck in the closed position, it will not allow coolant to flow through the motor, and your engine will become hotter than usual. The hotter your engine gets, the more likely it is to suffer a major mechanical problem, such as a blown head gasket. If your vehicle is overheating, the thermostat might be to blame, especially if you have enough coolant and cannot find a problem with the radiator or water pump.

Running Too Cool

    An engine that runs at a cooler temperature than what is recommended often does not attract the attention that an overheating motor will. However, running too cool will keep your vehicle from performing its best and prevent your heater from working properly in cold weather.

Emissions Problems

    The temperature of your engine affects the way fuel and oil are consumed and used by the engine. If your engine is running too cool, the fuel might condense on the cylinders and decrease your fuel mileage. It might also cause your vehicle to run lean, which will trigger your O2 sensors and affect your vehicle's emissions. A vehicle running too hot might consume too much fuel or burn oil, which will also cause emissions issues. If you notice too much exhaust, colored exhaust or your car fails an emissions test, the thermostat might be to blame.

Blue Point Scan Tools

Snap-on Inc. manufactures the Blue Point brand of diagnostic scan tools. The scan tools plug into your on-board diagnostic II (OBDII) system, which allows you to obtain vehicle statistics and diagnostic trouble codes (DTC). OBDII systems are found on all vehicles made after 1996, and these systems use industry-wide standard codes that allow you to easily diagnose a problem no matter what type of vehicle you drive.

CanOBD2 Car Reader

    The Car Reader Controller Area Network OBD2 (CanOBD2) is compatible with vehicles made between 1996 to the present, and it comes with a light-emitting diode (LED) screen that is color-coded based on the type of DTC code. This tool allows you to view the errors associated with your Check Engine light and to clear the warning after you fix the problem. The CanOBD2 Car Reader is plug-and-play, which means that your system will recognize it as soon as you plug it in. The manufacturer's product number for this tool is YA3020 and it costs $66.85 as of November 2010.

CanOBD2 ABS Scan Tool

    The Scan Tool, Anti-lock Brake System (ABS) and CanOBD2 allows you to diagnose problems associated with your ABS, CAN and OBD2 systems. This tool allows you to view error codes associated with your transmission and original equipment manufacturer -(OEM) enhanced systems. You can pull up freeze frame data about your vehicle, which means that the tool will capture information about a particular moment in time, and you can use this data to compare current, past and future performance. This scan tool comes with software for a Windows-based system so that you can view the scan tool data on your computer or laptop. The manufacturer's product number for this tool is YA3160 and it costs $339.55 as of November 2010.

CanOBD2 Diagnostic Tool

    This tool comes with three language displays for Spanish, English and French and it allows you to diagnose and erase Check Engine light warnings. It also comes with an emissions readiness warning light, which could indicate that you have a problem with your emissions sensor. You can connect this tool to your computer, and pull up or print reports. You can also update this diagnostic tool with the latest vehicle model information via the Internet and capture freeze frame data. The manufacturer's product number is YA31000 and it costs $154.35 as of November 2010.

Jumat, 11 Februari 2011

How do I Troubleshoot the Check Engine Light Codes on a 2002 VW Cabrio?

How do I Troubleshoot the Check Engine Light Codes on a 2002 VW Cabrio?

On-Board Diagnostics became standardized in the United States in 1996. In Europe, it became standardized in 2001. For a 2002 Volkswagen Cabrio, it depends on where the vehicle was sold. Volkswagens in the United States will abide by OBD-II diagnostic coding. Volkswagens in sold in Europe will go EOBD codes. This is important because it will dictate the type scanner needed for diagnosing engine light problems. There are scanners that can read both codes, and using a scanner on a Volkswagen Cabrio is relatively easy.

Instructions

    1

    Insert your key into the Cabrio's ignition. Leave the key there, but do not turn it just yet. The electrical system and engine should be off. Also, leave your scanner's user manual on the middle console or the passenger's seat. You will return to the key and manual later.

    2

    Locate the data link connection in the Cabrio. It's a 16-pin receptor your scanner will hook up to. It should be underneath the driver's-side dashboard and to the left.

    3

    Connect your diagnostic scanner with the data link connector. The next couple of steps will slightly vary by the brand and type of scanner you own. Button configurations and operations are not exactly the same. Some scanners will switch themselves on, and others will not. Consult your manual as to the exact process.

    4

    Turn the engine on. If you own a scanner that does not feature an "auto-on," power the scanner up.

    5

    Key in a command to "Read" the codes, if your scanner is not the type to immediately retrieve them upon connection. It should only take a second for the trouble code to stream from the Cabrio to your scanner.

    6

    Consult your scanner for code descriptions. This will help you pinpoint the issues that triggered check engine light on the dashboard. Your scanner's manual may only contain generic codes universal to all OBD-II or EOBD systems. If this is the case, you will need to find a website that has Volkswagen specific codes.

    7

    Turn the engine off and unhook the scanner. Now that you know what has caused the check engine light to become active, you can make an educated decision to either do the repair work yourself or drive the Cabrio to a Volkswagen-approved mechanic.

How to Detect A/C Leaks With Dye

How to Detect A/C Leaks With Dye

If you experience diminished cold air from your automobile's A/C system, you may possibly be low on refrigerant. The loss of refrigerant often happens through tiny leaks in the A/C system that are hard to detect with the naked eye. The most effective way to test for leaks is by placing dye into the system, making the lead stand out.

Instructions

    1

    Turn the ignition to off completely to ensure that the the engine is not running.

    2

    Open the hood of your auto. Locate the refrigerant inlets inside the engine compartment along aluminum tubing that is connected to your A/C system, one high and one low. Refer to your specific owner's manual for the exact location of these lines.

    3

    Unscrew the plastic cap from the lower refrigerant inlet. Thread the end of the A/C refrigerant dye onto this inlet. Depress the button on top of the refrigerant can, releasing dye into the system. Press the button until the gauge on the can of A/C refrigerant dye indicates that the system is full.

    4

    Remove the empty can of A/C refrigerant dye from the inlet. Replace the plastic cap onto the inlet.

    5

    Start the automobile's ignition. Turn on the A/C and place on the highest, coldest setting available.

    6

    Turn on the UV light. Carefully examine the engine compartment, concentrating on the areas around your A/C system compressor and aluminum lines. Any leaks in the system will luminesce under the UV light and be very visible.

    7

    Mark any leaks in the system with a wax marker for later reference. Turn off the engine when testing is complete.

Rabu, 09 Februari 2011

Problems With the Cruise Control on a Ford Escape

Problems With the Cruise Control on a Ford Escape

Cruise control can be a great feature on a vehicle, unless it does not work properly or causes other problems with the car. The Ford Escape SUV has a history of cruise control system problems. Parts of the cruise control system for the 2001 through 2004 Ford Escape have been recalled by Ford. Several problems can occur with the Escape's cruise control system.

Stuck Speed Control Cable

    Escapes manufactured between 2002 and 2004 equipped with the 3.0-liter V6 engine might experience a problem with the speed control cable getting stuck in position and preventing the vehicle from slowing back to an idle. This problem lengthens the vehicle's stopping distance. A stuck speed control cable has the potential to cause serious accidents.

Faulty Speed Control Cable Components

    Ford recalled a number of 2001 Escapes because the servo cap locating tab on the speed-control cable has a tendency to crack or fall off. The locating tab can enter the clutch cavity and cause problems with the speed control's inner clutch system. Also, water can reach the exposed parts of the cable and cause corrosion believed to be partially responsible for the speed control cable getting stuck in place in these vehicles.

Other Cruise Control Problems

    According to the Washington Post, Ford has recalled approximately 10 million vehicles for cruise control system problems in the last decade. The cruise control switch in Ford vehicles has been repeatedly noted for malfunctioning in various ways. The most notable cruise control recall was caused by the cruise control deactivation switch failing to deactivate, overheating and causing the vehicle to catch fire. Though the Escape was not included in this recall, there have been reports that both the Escape and the Mazda Tribute (its mechanical twin) mysteriously catching fire.

1989 Sedan Deville Fuse Box Specifications

1989 Sedan Deville Fuse Box Specifications

If there is something electrical that is not working properly in your vehicle, you should check the fuse box. The 1989 Cadillac Deville has the fuse box located on the underside of the plastic trim panel of the dash. You will need to know the location of the fuse you need to replace as well as the specific fuse size for that area. Fuses are color coded to make them easier to identify.

Fuse Identification

    Amps are indicated by fuse colors. There are several fuse colors, including violet (3 amps), tan (5 amps), brown (7.5 amps), red (10 amps), clear (20 amps) and white (25 amps).

Row 1 (Top Row)

    Rheostat-controlled instrument panel lamps are in the top left fuse spot. This is a 5-amp fuse.

Row 2

    The left fuse is a 10-amp fuse for the cornering lamps, front side marker lamps, right-hand-door ashtray lamp, and the instrument panel ASM tray lamp. The fuse on the right is for the windows cavity black connector.

Row 3

    The far left fuse is for the trunk release cavity and the E.L.C. wire assembly cavity. The second fuse from the left is 10 amps for the backup lights. The 20-amp fuse second from the right is for the air conditioner and generator. The 10 amp on the far right is the antenna feed.

Row 4

    The far left fuse is for the illuminated entry disable cavity and the E.L.C. wire assembly cavity. The next fuse is a 20 amp for the turn signals. The next one is a 25 amp for the opera lamps, rear side marker, tail lamps and license lamp. The 20 amp fuse on the far right is for the stop lamps and the hazard warning lights.

Row 5

    The far left fuse is a 20 amp for the oil pressure telltale, fuel gauge, low brake telltale, coolant temperature telltale, seatbelt warning buzzer/lamp and the downshift switch. The 20-amp fuse next to that is the instrument panel courtesy, engine temperature telltale, instrument panel cigar light, glove-box lamp and the key warning buzzer. The 25-amp fuse to the far right is for the A.T.C. blower.

Row 6

    The small, far-right fuse is for the E.L.C wire assembly cavity and the C.L.C.C. feed cavity. The 10 amp next to that is for the radio. The second one from the right is a 20 amp for the cigar lighters and courtesy lamps. The small, far-left fuse is for the seats cavity.

Row 7

    The 25 amp on the far left is the fuse for the windshield wipers, windshield wiper fluid and fluid telltale. The small fuse next to that is the rear defogger cavity fuse. The next one is the C.L.C.C. free cavity fuse.

Row 8

    The bottom left fuse is the trunk telltale cavity fuse.

How to Troubleshoot a Diesel Fuel Injection

With the complexity of today's diesel engines, the sheer number of things that can go wrong in such a system is maddening. The diesel fuel injection system is the component of the diesel engine that pumps the fuel into the engine. If this component is in some manner malfunctioning, it can reduce the performance of your engine, cause unnecessary wear, or even prevent your engine from starting. It is possible to troubleshoot a number of these problems by yourself.

Instructions

    1

    Check for and clear any clogs in the distributor section of the fuel pump. These clogs can cause the rotor to seize. These systems use the diesel fuel itself as a lubricant.

    2

    Check for air in the fuel lines if you are experiencing problems either with starting the engine or you experience stalling. If air gets into the lines it results in a loss of fuel pressure in the system, thus leading to problems such as the inability to start the engine or stalling.

    3

    Check for corrosion on the circuit board responsible for the regulation of fuel flow into the system. Check the bottom of your injection pump for the connections. If you find significant corrosion, you may need to replace the unit. This problem results from the nature of the technology itself, with the designs on which the injection system is based being older than, and not meant for, the computer that controls it.

    4

    Check your fuel filter(s) for clogging. Change them if necessary. This type of routine maintenance is generally performed every 100000 to 150000 miles.

    5

    Check for water in the fuel system. If you find water, you will need to replace or repair the sylinator unit, which functions to remove water. Common symptoms of water in the fuel system include stalling, poor performance, and not being able to start the engine.

    6

    Check for a rupture of the diesel lift pump diaphragm. Signs of a rupture include wearing of the piston. Symptoms of such a rupture include a lack of fuel pressure or low pressure.

    7

    Check the calibration of the injection unit. If you suspect the calibration is off, recalibration is usually accomplished at a manufacturer's service center. This type of issue is usually found in new systems.

Senin, 07 Februari 2011

Problems With a Clutch

Problems With a Clutch

The clutch is an essential part of an automotive vehicle, but since it's a component that's frequently in use during journeys, it's vulnerable to a range of problems. Many of these are a result of wear and tear which comes naturally as a vehicle and its parts age, while other issues may arise because of ill-fitted or faulty clutch system components.

Slippage

    The vehicle owner may find that over time, her vehicle's clutch begins to slip; this becomes particularly obvious when the vehicle is placed into a higher gear but is travelling reasonably slowly, or is heading up a hill, for instance. This slippage is often caused by wear on the clutch disc, which means the clutch's pressure plate exerts less force. The wear on the clutch disc will only get worse, since the slippage will produce heat which adds to the damage, as noted on the Automotive Clutches website. When replacing a worn clutch disc, it's also worth checking other parts for damage, such as the pressure plate, since these may have been affected by the slippage problem as well.

Release

    If a clutch does not fully release, the engine may stall or the driver may have difficulty getting the vehicle into gear. This is because a clutch which fails to release clearly when the pedal is held down actually continues to turn the input shaft. Clutch release problems can be caused by a wide variety of issues, as described by the Automotive Clutches website. There may be a badly installed or faulty part present in the clutch system, such as a incorrectly positioned clutch disc. Alternatively, a component such as a pivot ball or a release cable may be corroded, loose or otherwise damaged. There might also be a problem with the clutch pedal itself.

Clutch Feels 'Soft'

    If the vehicle driver is pressing down on the clutch pedal and the clutch feels a little spongy, this is often a result of an issue with the contents of the brake fluid reservoir. If the brake fluid reservoir depletes, the level can sometimes fall below the hose linking the reservoir to the clutch master cylinder. This lack of brake fluid results in air in the system, making the clutch pedal feel "soft" when depressed. The driver should check the reservoir and fill it if need be.

Squealing Noise

    Drivers might experience a squealing noise whenever they press down the clutch pedal on their vehicle. Although clutch noise can have a variety of causes, in this case, it is often a result of a problem with one of the bearings found in the clutch system, for example a release or pilot bearing, as noted on the Automotive Clutches website. These bearings should be checked and replaced with better versions.

Minggu, 06 Februari 2011

What Makes a Car Sputter?

What Makes a Car Sputter?

Your vehicle's motor is made up of a number of electrical and mechanical systems that may cause the car to sputter. If you know the basic mechanics of your motor, you can quickly troubleshoot a malfunctioning motor.

Description

    You can detect vehicle sputtering from the distinct sound and feeling that emanates from the car. The exhaust will emit a rapid "pop" noise that sounds like bursts of air coming through a pipe when the vehicle sputters. When you accelerate or drive steadily, the vehicle will feel as if it is momentarily losing power.

Causes

    A malfunctioning battery will not provide adequate power to your vehicle's ignition system when the motor is idling, causing significant sputter. Your engine will also sputter if the amount of gas in your gas tank is not sufficient to power the vehicle. Spark plugs that fail to fire will cause your engine to run erratically and sputter under normal driving.

Prevention/Solution

    Typically, spark plugs are replaced every 60,000 miles, though you may need to replace yours if they foul and no longer work. Test your battery with a voltmeter to ensure that it is providing the necessary "cranking amps" to power your vehicle. Keep at least a quarter-tank of fuel in your vehicle whenever possible, and use the next highest octane fuel rating to test if your engine operates better.

How to Detect Car Cylinder Head Problems

Your cylinder is an important component in your car engine's operation and performance. Your head gasket seals the cylinder head; there is an opening in your cylinder that allows coolant to transfer through the head. Coolant cools the engine by flowing through the cylinder. If you are having problems with your car cylinder and/or head gasket, the detection and repair of these issues will keep your car cool and running properly. Since the car cylinder and the head gasket are different parts, the cost to repair each is different.

Instructions

    1

    Determine if there is a strong coolant odor in your vehicle. Such an odor could indicate a leak in coolant and a potential car cylinder or head gasket problem.

    2

    Identify if smoke is coming from your exhaust pipe. This could also indicate a car cylinder or head gasket issue. The smoke tells you that some component in your car is heating up more than it should and is actually smoking to alert you of the excess heat.

    3

    Check for coolant under your car after if has been off for a few hours. This also indicates a potential coolant leak, which may be a crack in the head gasket or an issue with the car cylinder.

    4

    Notice if you have to add coolant regularly or your check coolant light continually lights up, which may indicate a coolant leak.

    5

    Hook your vehicle up to a mechanic's diagnostic computer to assess any cylinder or gasket problems. These machines automatically tell the mechanic if there are issues with the cylinder or gasket. Mechanics do charge for these diagnostic tests and they are usually quick and efficient.

Airbag Codes for a 2004 Ford Escape

Whether your Escape came in the base model with a four-cylinder or any other trim level with the 3.0-liter six-cylinder, you have a sophisticated air bag system. You air bag system is designed to self test to ensure all circuits and air bags will work properly if needed. There are two different sets of air bag codes that can be read from your escape. Your air bag light will flash different flash codes when there is a fault, just like the old OBD-1 check engine light. You can also hook up a scan tool to read more in-depth trouble codes that can be more accurate.

Flash Codes 15 Through 24

    Code 15 is related to the driver side air bag being shorted either to ground or to power; This is normally a result of a damaged wire somewhere in the circuit. Code 16 is exactly the same as code 15 only it refers to a short to ground or power in the passenger air bag circuit. Codes 17 and 18 refer to the driver and passenger side pretensioner circuits having a short to power or ground. Code 19 is different from the earlier codes and means that the restraints control module crash data memory is full; It should be replaced along with the crash sensors. If your escape is displaying code 21, there is high resistance in the RCM ground circuit and code 24 means the RCM is faulty and needs to be replaced.

Flash Codes 29 Through 37

    Flash code 29 means that the RCM is programmed with a different vehicle identification number than what the ECM is relaying to it. Code 32 means there is high resistance in the driver air bag circuit and code 33 means the same for the passenger side circuit. Codes 34 and 35 indicate low resistance in the driver or passenger air bag circuit. Code 36 and 37 are displayed as repeats of previous codes; 36 can mean there is a short to power or ground in the driver air bag circuit, along with high or low resistance in the driver air bag circuit. Code 37 means the same for the passenger side air bag circuit.

Flash codes 42 Through 49

    Code 42 means the driver side crash sensor has a mounting fault; 43 means the same for the passenger side crash sensor. Flash codes 44 and 45 means there is a communications fault between the RCM and the driver or passenger crash sensors, respectively. Code 46 relates to the driver side pretensioner circuit being either open or of low resistance; code 47 means the same for the passenger pretensioner. Codes 48 and 49 mean the driver or passenger crash sensor is faulted and should be replaced.

Additional Information

    The dealership has a long list of pinpoint testing that can help diagnose the exact fault, as the description of codes are rather vague, similar to the OBD-1 systems of older vehicles. The most important thing to remember when diagnosing your air bag system is to always disconnect the battery and follow the air bag deactivation procedures listed in your owners manual. Air bags can be dangerous and even fatal if accidentally deployed. In most cases it is recommended to have your local dealership or mechanic perform diagnosis and repair of the SRS system.

Pontiac GP Security Light Problems

Pontiac GP Security Light Problems

Generally, seeing the blinking security light to the left of steering wheel on your Pontiac Grand Prix, or GP, is comforting. Sometimes, however, problems arise to make the security system seem like more of a hassle than a helpful feature.

Function

    When your Grand Prix starts and functions properly, you will see the security light flashing only after you get out of the car and lock it. The security system, however, also may indicate issues regarding your car's key and ignition.

Problems

    Perhaps your car's engine shuts off roughly three seconds after you turn it on, or maybe it will not start. If the security light blinks, chances are good that the Grand Prix security system created the problem.

Solutions

    The first way to try to solve the problem is to use a spare ignition key. A key's microchip often wears out, causing the security system to reject the key. If that doesn't work, rotate the key in the ignition to the "On" position, and wait until the security light disappears. Then turn the key to the "Accessories" position and then to the "Off" position. You also could try to bypass the security system by installing a relay. If none of those methods work, consult a Pontiac dealership.

Sabtu, 05 Februari 2011

Toyota CEL Code 25

A modern vehicle's on-board diagnostic (OBD) computer monitors engine sensors and activates a warning light when a problem is detected. For Toyotas manufactured after 1995, you can scan the computer for a five-character trouble code. Toyotas built before 1996 use two-digit "blink codes" instead.

Procedure

    To read the error code on a pre-1996 Toyota engine, you must jump two wires in the diagnostic terminal. The on-board computer will respond by flashing the check engine light in a pattern of long and short dashes, called a blink code.

Reading Codes

    Some error codes on Toyotas are comprised of two-digit numbers such as "25." The blink code consists of long flashes for the first digit and short flashes for the second. For example, "Code 25" is represented by two long flashes followed by five short flashes.

Code 25

    Code 25 on a Toyota indicates that the air-fuel ratio is lean (too much air). This error condition is often caused by a faulty O2 sensor, a vacuum leak or a problem with the fuel pump. Refer to your owner's manual for specific diagnostic information.

How to Troubleshoot the Brakes on 2003 Dodge Truck

How to Troubleshoot the Brakes on 2003 Dodge Truck

Dodge heavy-duty pickup trucks have been driven everywhere from the battlefield to the freeway. Whether you're on the front lines or at a job site, the last thing you need to worry about is the brakes on your truck. You can troubleshoot the brakes on your 2003 Dodge Truck yourself, using just a few simple tools. You will not need professional training to complete this task, although you may need to contact a mechanic if your brakes need replacing. It should only take about an hour to properly check the brakes on your 2003 Dodge truck.

Instructions

    1

    Pop your Dodge's hood and find the master cylinder located on the firewall of the driver's side. Check the "fill line" on the cylinder's side. If the brake fluid does not reach up to the "fill line," your truck's anti-lock brake system may not function properly. Pour DOT5 brake fluid into the cylinder until the fluid reaches the "fill line."

    2

    Jack up your Dodge, placing the jack behind the front-left wheel. Use a jack stand to stabilize your truck. Disconnect the wheel's lug nuts using the tire iron that came with your truck and disconnect the wheel itself. Look at the brake pad; there should be at least 1/2-inch of padding left on both of the pads. If there is not sufficient padding on the brake pads, they are worn out and may not work properly during sudden stops. Replace the tire and perform the same inspection on the rear driver's-side brake. The passenger's-side brakes will be worn identically to the driver's-side brakes, so you will not need to inspect them.

    3

    Drive your truck at 30 mph in an empty parking lot when the parking lot is wet. Press the brake pedal quickly while driving and notice if your truck slides. Your truck should stop cleanly and quickly, and you should notice a slight pumping in the brake pedal followed by a click. If your truck slides, the anti-lock brake system is not functioning correctly. Only attempt this test if you have made sure that the brake fluid level and brake pads are sufficient.

How to Connect an MT 2500 to a 2001 Jetta

The MT2500 is an automotive diagnostic tool manufactured by Snap-On. The MT2500 connects with all vehicles equipped with on-board diagnostics version two (OBD-II). All vehicles 1996 and newer have the standardized OBD-II system, including the 2001 Volkswagen Jetta. By connecting the MT2500 to the Jetta, you can read the error codes stored within the car's memory and make an attempt to diagnose the problem.

Instructions

    1

    Bring the MT2500 to the Jetta. Sit in the driver's seat and insert the ignition key. Turn the key to "Run" or "On."

    2

    Examine the area beneath the lower steering column panel, close to the left edge of the center console. Find the OBD-II port. The port is rectangular. It is the exact same size as the connection port coming from the MT2500.

    3

    Plug the MT2500's connection port into the OBD-II port. Push the "Power" switch on the MT2500 to turn it on and to connect with the Jetta's on-board diagnostics system.

Jumat, 04 Februari 2011

Would Bad Spark Plugs Turn the Engine Light On?

Would Bad Spark Plugs Turn the Engine Light On?

In 1996, the U.S. government passed a law requiring all vehicles to change to the OBD-II onboard diagnostics system, which standardized the system to illuminate a "Check Engine" light any time the vehicle's emissions exceed 1.5 times the federal standards. Prior to this law change, the systems monitored mechanical and electrical functions of the vehicle and only illuminated a malfunction light when there was a mechanical or electrical problem. Though often forgotten, the spark plugs play an integral part of regulating your vehicle's emissions.

Ignition System's Involvement in Emissions

    The ignition system is responsible for burning virtually all of the fuel that enters the combustion chamber. There is always a small amount of raw fuel that escapes through the exhaust, and federal emission standards allow for this. The ignition system also burns harmful gases from the crankcase introduced into the combustion chamber via the PCV system. This prevents these gases from entering the atmosphere and increasing the vehicle's harmful emissions.

Bad Spark Plugs

    The spark plugs play a key role in the burning of fuel and harmful crankcase gases. The spark plug takes the electrical charge created by the ignition system and forces it to jump a gap. When the charge jumps this gap, it creates the spark needed to ignite the fuel and air mixture in the combustion chamber.

    If the spark plugs cannot create a spark hot enough to burn all of the fuel in the combustion chamber, harmful emissions increase and the "Check Engine" light turns on.

Repairing the Problem

    Rectifying the problem does not always involve replacing the spark plugs. If a substance coats the spark plugs -- called fouling -- you may be able to remove the spark plugs, clean them off with solvent or sandpaper, adjust the gap and reinstall them. This is especially helpful in cars that use expensive iridium- or platinum-tipped spark plugs.

    If the spark plugs are worn out due to age, the only way to rectify the problem is to replace them. You can identify excessively aged spark plugs by checking the gap between the ground and center electrodes. If the gap is out of specification, it is time to change the plugs.

Underlying Problems

    Keep in mind that if your vehicle constantly fouls spark plugs, there is an underlying problem or problems causing this. There are four main causes of spark plug fouling: incorrect air-fuel mixture, burning oil, preignition and cold spark. Check your vehicle for these problems, if it continually fouls spark plugs, and repair it as soon as possible to prevent additional problems.

Can a Blocked Catalytic Converter Affect The Transmission?

While your car's emissions and transmission systems may seem unconnected, the fact is that modern cars are so intricately networked that one can easily affect the other. Diagnosis can be difficult, but knowing how your car works is a good start.

Blocked Converter Detection

    All cars produced after 1996 have at least two oxygen sensors, one before and one after the converter. Blocked catalytic converter passages will force exhaust heat to exit through the remaining passages, trapping it inside the converter and causing its internal temperature to skyrocket. The oxygen sensor detects this temperature difference and notifies the computer.

Computer De-tuning

    Upon detecting severe converter blockage, the computer will automatically reduce timing and the air/fuel ratio to prevent engine damage and complete converter melt-down. This "limp home" mode can also include changes to the transmission programming to reduce load on the engine. These changes can include locking out the overdrive, changing shift firmness, reducing shift RPM and changing the torque converter lock-up point.

Other Effects

    A blocked converter can reach over 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit internally, and eventually the torque converter case can begin to glow red hot. These kinds of temperatures can easily boil transmission fluid if the converter is too close to the transmission or transmission cooler lines. This can manifest as torque converter slippage, clutch slippage, excess RPM and possible outright transmission failure.