Minggu, 31 Maret 2013

Troubleshooting a Fuel Pump in a Porche 944

The Porsche 944 was built until 1991. It was produced with a 3.0 liter inline four cylinder engine and came standard with many different features, including power brakes, a power sunroof, cruise control, air conditioning, power windows, a five-speed manual transmission and four wheel anti-lock brakes. It was also equipped with an electric fuel pump that sits inside the car's fuel tank and sends fuel from the gas tank to the engine. By properly troubleshooting the fuel pump you may find that another fuel system component is faulty and save yourself the time it would have taken to access and replace the pump.

Instructions

    1

    Watch for your Porsche to exhibit symptoms of a failed fuel pump. The two primary symptoms of a bad fuel pump is the Porsche failing to start when you turn the ignition key and the engine stalling when you push down on the accelerator pedal to increase the Porsche's speed.

    2

    Make sure the fuel pressure is in the proper range. Connect a fuel pressure gauge to the Schrader valve of your car. The Schrader valve looks very similar to a air nozzle on a bicycle or car tire and is located at the top of your engine. Once you have connected the fuel pressure gauge to the valve, turn your Porsche on and let the engine idle. Read the gauge to see if the fuel pressure is within an acceptable range. The proper fuel pressure range for a 1991 Porsche 944 is 46 to 51 pounds per square inch.

    3

    Check to see if the fuel pressure regulator is causing your fuel system problems instead of a faulty fuel pump. If your Porsche has low fuel pressure the fuel pressure regulator may be at fault instead of the fuel pump. With the fuel pressure gauge still attached to the Schrader valve, find the fuel pressure regulator, which is near the Schrader valve, and gently squeeze the fuel line running to the regulator while the Porsche's engine is idling. If the fuel pressure gauge shows the car's fuel pressure increasing as you squeeze the fuel line the regulator is bad and should be repaired or replaced.

    4

    Make sure the fuel pump begins working when the battery begins to work. The fuel pump should begin pulling gas from the fuel tank as soon as the battery of the car starts energizing. Turn your ignition key one notch to the right so that the battery is on but the Porsche's engine is not. Sit and listen for the fuel pump. You should be able to hear it working if it is still functioning properly. You will need to perform this test in a quiet place or you may need a second individual to help you listen for the pump.

How Much Coolant Should Flow Out of the Upper Radiator Hose?

How Much Coolant Should Flow Out of the Upper Radiator Hose?


Before the Thermostat Opens

    As long as the engine is running and the belt is turning the water pump, a small amount of coolant will flow from the upper radiator hose. Until the engine warms up, and the thermostat opens, this will be a small stream.

When the Thermostat Opens

    When the thermostat opens, there should be a steady flow of coolant from the hose. Even with the hose still attached to the thermostat housing, pressure should be felt in the upper hose by attempting to squeeze it.

Bottom Line

    The flow from the upper hose should be checked on a relatively warm engine with the thermostat open. If the flow is a mere trickle there is not enough coolant in the system, a leak in the system or a faulty water pump.

Jumat, 29 Maret 2013

My 1986 Honda CRX Has a Spark But Won't Start

My 1986 Honda CRX Has a Spark But Won't Start

The CR-X is a two-door hatchback manufactured by Honda between the 1983 and 1991 model years. The CR-X is equipped with either a four-speed automatic or five-speed manual transmission. Reasons that the CR-X may have trouble starting can be related to either the fuel delivery or ignition systems. These areas should be thoroughly examined, using standard troubleshooting procedures, before performing more involved diagnostics.

Instructions

    1

    Put fuel in the CR-X's fuel tank. The fuel tank may be empty, or the issue could be a bad fuel gauge.

    2

    Inspect the timing belt by removing the cover, as the belt may have slipped or snapped altogether. If the problem lies here, it is highly recommended that you seek a qualified mechanic to replace the belt, as the process is extremely involved.

    3

    Turn the key in the ignition. Carefully listen for the fuel pump to engage and pressurize the fuel-injection system. If you are unable to hear anything, have a qualified mechanic inspect the fuel pump and replace it if necessary.

Kamis, 28 Maret 2013

My Nissan Pathfinder Won't Start

My Nissan Pathfinder Won't Start

There are a variety of reasons why your car might not start. Some reasons can be quite complex, but the most common causes are simple and easy to address yourself. By gaining a better understanding of what makes your car go and reading through the check list of common problems, you can rule out those likely causes. This will allow you to avoid spending money unnecessarily on an auto mechanic and get your car running again quickly.

Instructions

    1

    Check that the car is in park. It seems obvious, but it's a common mistake for people to overlook. There's a hidden switch that is moved when the gear shift is in park in order for the starter motor to do its job and start the engine. If the car is in a different gear, like drive, the switch won't do its job.

    2

    Check your gas level. Your car needs gasoline in order to run. If you attempt to turn your car on and you fail to hear the fuel pump turn on to build up the fuel pressure, then you might need to get to the closest gas station, pick up a canister of gas and pour it into your tank. If there is gas in the tank, then you could have a fuel pump failure. This is easily detectable with a fuel pressure gauge.

    3

    Check your engine oil level. Your car oil acts as a lubricant for different parts of the car engine. If the oil levels get too low, parts of the engine have friction and wear each other out. Making sure your car is on a level area, pull out the car's dipstick and wipe it with a clean cloth. Then, insert the dipstick into the oil tank and pull it out to check the oil line. If the oil level appears to be below the full mark, add some more oil.

    4

    Check your battery. The starter motor needs enough speed to start the engine. This requires a charged battery. If you turn the ignition key and just hear a clicking noise, the battery is likely the problem. An easy way to check the battery is to check the dashboard lights. If they appear faint or dim, this points to an unhealthy battery. Ask someone to help you with a battery jump start.

1974 Corvette Battery Troubleshooting

1974 Corvette Battery Troubleshooting

The 1974 was the last year Corvette featured the big block engine. Small suspension changes were made to the front and rear, owing to a new, heavier bumper desgn that added 30 pounds to the weight of the car. If the battery in your Corvette has stopped providing reliable cranking power, it's time to troubleshoot it. Test the voltage in the battery to make sure it's strong enough to support the engine's needs.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Corvette in a level, well-lit area and shut the engine off. Pull the hood lever and prop the hood up.

    2

    Identify the battery. It's a rectangular engine part on the front of the engine, on the driver's side. It has two metal posts either on the top or on one side to which the red and black cables are connected. Most batteries have a strap that makes removal and installation easier, and many have a hard plastic cover. Remove the cover.

    3

    Connect the positive, or red, test lead of your voltmeter to the positive battery terminal, identifiable by the red battery cable connector attached to it. Then connect the negative, or black, test lead of the voltmeter to the negative battery terminal, identifiable by the black battery cable connector.

    4

    Look at the voltage reading registering on the voltmeter's screen. A sound battery produces between 12.5 and 12.8 volts. Anything less is a sign of a weak battery.

Rabu, 27 Maret 2013

Ford E350 Speedometer Malfunction

Ford E350 Speedometer Malfunction

The Ford E350 chassis is used in a number of large vehicles, including vans, motor homes and trucks. Speedometer problems in these vehicles can occur for a number of reasons but are most commonly associated with malfunction of the vehicle's speed sensor, trouble with computer controls or data stored in the vehicle's computers or loose cables.

Speedometer Cable Malfunction

    The speedometer is connected to the speed sensor and the vehicle's computer by cables. The speedometer may malfunction of the speedometer cable is knocked loose or if the cable itself malfunctions. Checking for loose connections or replacing the cable may fix speedometer malfunctions.

Change of Tire Size

    The Ford E350's internal computer calculates the vehicle's speed based on the speed the wheels are rotating and the size of the tires. If the vehicle's tires are replaced with tires of a different size, the speedometer must be updated with new tire size information. Otherwise, the vehicle's computer will be unable to correctly calculate the vehicle's speed.

Speed Sensor Malfunction

    The vehicle speed sensor monitors the speed at which the vehicle's wheels are spinning and uses that data to calculate the vehicle's speed. Malfunction of the speed sensor can cause the speedometer to display incorrect information, to jump around or to fail to move. Malfunction of the VSS can also cause failure or unreliability of other systems, such as anti-lock braking, automatic transmission, cruise control and power steering.

Programmable Speedometer and Odometer Module

    The programmable speedometer and odometer module is a computerized instrument cluster that stores the vehicle's odometer reading and displayed speed information. The PSOM calculates its information based on data provided by the speed sensor. Malfunction of the PSOM would cause both the speedometer and odometer to cease displaying information.

Troubleshooting Versa Checks

Troubleshooting Versa Checks

The Versa is manufactured by Nissan Motors and has been in production since 2007. The Versa is a compact vehicle that has a major benefit of being economical to drive. Just like other vehicles, the Versa will sometimes have problems such as not starting or making odd sounds that will need to be examined in order to determine what the problem is and repair it appropriately. There are certain checks that can be done prior to calling a professional mechanic to determine the cause of the problem.

Instructions

    1

    Determine if your Nissan Versa will start. Put the key in the ignition and turn it. If the key does not turn, adjust the steering wheel to be sure it is locked and try again. If it does not start there are a few simple things to check.

    2

    Check to be sure that your Versa has fuel. Without the appropriate amount of gas, the engine will not start. Add a gallon of gas and attempt to start the engine again.

    3

    Turn the key in the ignition to the "Accessories" mode. Turn on the interior lights or headlights of the Versa on. If they do not light up, the battery may need to be jump-started, charged or replaced.

    4

    Open the hood of the Versa. Locate and check the oil, transmission fluid and coolant. Low fluid levels can cause major problems to the engine, transmission and more. Make sure the each fluid is filled between the minimum and maximum lines.

    5

    Attempt to start the engine. If the Versa does not start and makes no sounds at all, the ignition switch could need to be replaced. If you hear a clicking noise, there may be a problem with the starter. If it starts and stops again, the fueling system may need work.

    6

    Call a professional mechanic if you cannot determine the cause of the problem or cannot repair the problem yourself. Have the car towed to the mechanic or dealership for further diagnostics and repair.

Selasa, 26 Maret 2013

How to Troubleshoot the Power Steering in a 1988 Toyota Camry

How to Troubleshoot the Power Steering in a 1988 Toyota Camry

The 1988 Toyota Camry has rack-and-pinion power assist steering. Problems like loss of power assist, play in the steering wheel and wandering can occur in your 1988 Camry, and the cause of the problem must be determined before repairs can be made. Troubleshoot the system and eliminate the simplest possible causes before moving on to more complex possibilities.

Instructions

    1

    Check your power steering fluid levels by opening the power steering fluid reservoir located under the hood, just in front of where the steering column projects through the rear of the engine compartment. Make sure the fluid level is sufficient by measuring it with the dipstick located beneath the reservoir cap. Low fluid levels can result in loss of power assist and tight steering. Low fluid levels also indicate a leak somewhere in the system. If you suspect a leak, check each part of the system for fresh fluid drips. Fix the leaky component and test to see that the system works normally.

    2

    Check the belts at the front of your engine. Inspect each one to make sure none are broken or severely worn. A broken power steering pump belt can cause your power steering system to completely fail. Replace any broken belts by laying a new belt over all of its corresponding pulleys except for the one closest to you. Pry the belt into place over the final pulley using a flat head screwdriver, taking care not to damage the belt. Test the power steering.

    3

    Check that the power steering pump is working. If the pump is not working, fluid will not reach the power steering components and the system will fail. Locate the high pressure power steering fluid line that runs between the pump and the rack. Find the test valve along this line and attach your flow meter. Read the gallons per minute rating and compare with the 1988 Camry shop manual specs for your specific trim package to see if the pump is operating in the proper range. Next, attach your pressure gauge to the test valve and compare the readings with your shop manual specs. If all the readings are OK, the pump is working. If they are not, the pump may require replacement.

    4

    Test the rack-and-pinion linkage for problems. There are many moving parts in the steering linkage and the Camry's front end which can cause steering problems like wandering and steering wheel play. With the car parked, turn the front wheels all the way in one direction and then all the way in the other direction. If you notice any play or unresponsiveness in the action you may have a linkage problem. Check every part of the steering linkage for wear and loose connections starting with the steering shaft which comes down from the steering wheel to the rack, the tie rods, inner sockets, rack mounts and control arms. If anything seems to have play, it may require replacement.

Senin, 25 Maret 2013

My 1994 Subaru Legacy Won't Start When Cold

My 1994 Subaru Legacy Won't Start When Cold

Many older cars that start easily in the warmer months may leave you stranded in the winter. Cars react to the cold as humans do and sometimes struggle to get going. If your 1994 Subaru Legacy won't start on a cold morning, it's likely caused by one of two things--the battery is going bad or the engine is too cold.

Instructions

    1

    Pop the hood of your 1994 Subaru Legacy and check the battery, or take your car to a local parts store and ask an attendant to check it for you.

    2

    Replace your car battery if it won't hold a charge. A new battery should help your car start better, even in the cold.

    3

    Purchase a Subaru Legacy engine block heater if your battery is still good. A block heater is designed to help your engine start in the cold and keeps important fluids from freezing when the temperature drops. It also allows your car's heater to blow warm air faster.

    4

    Install your Subaru Legacy block heater onto your engine, following the directions provided in the packaging. Plug the end of the block heater into an electrical outlet or into an extension cord.

    5

    Start your Subaru Legacy with ease on cold days.

ODX Protocols

ODX Protocols

ODX is the commercial name for the MCD2 data interchange format used by automotive manufacturers to exchange diagnostic data about failing engine components. If you've ever had a car give you a strange diagnostic number that your dealer or mechanic has translated by plugging a sensor into a data port, the diagnostic number is an ODX data reference and your dealer had a tool that looked up the number and cross referenced it against a database to find the problem. The organization that created and maintains ODX is the ASAM, the Association for the Standardization of Automation and Measuring Systems.

Standardization Benefits of the ODX Protocol

    Prior to the development of the ODX protocol for data interchange, each manufacturer of an assembly specified their own data format, and quality assurance technicians at the manufacturer level or service technicians at the retail level had to hope that they were up to date on all of the assembly diagnostic tools. Even worse, different vendors needed different kinds of data collected, and the number of diagnostic tools proliferated. By making one standard data format that can include everything, the standardization of data allowed a great reduction in the number of diagnostic tools an auto shop worker had to be competent with.

Functional Specification of the ODX Protocol

    ODX data is an XML data format, which is superficially similar to HTML codes; in XML formats, you can specify what data is stored in which set of tags, such as the trouble codes, what types of data will be exchanged, the input and output parameters and what electronic control unit (ECU) configurations are expected. The full functional specification is written in diagrammatic form in Unified Modeling Language (UML) as ISO 22901-1:2008 and, beyond the schema (tag specifications) for defining what goes where in the XML file, it also specifies the protocol by which data is extracted from ECUs.

Third-Party Tools That Handle ODX Protocol Data

    The ODX protocol, being an open standard, has allowed a thriving third-party market for developers who can make ODX protocol-compatible testing hardware and databases of error codes and diagnostic information. Most of the end market for these services and products are auto dealerships and mechanics shops; of particular note is that since the format is extendable, and committed in software and data structures, it can be updated without forcing wholesale replacement of diagnostic equipment.

Problems With the Engine Mount

Problems With the Engine Mount

Engine mounts reduce engine vibration during operation and hold the integral component in place. When these parts become worn or broken the effects can cascade through a vehicle, affecting everything from engine operation to emissions and even heating and cooling systems. Automotive repair website Pioneer Auto Inc recommends checking engine mounts after every major engine repair job.

Engine Rocking or Twisting

    A damaged or failed engine mount can cause excessive rocking or twisting in the engine block, according to automotive repair website AA1 Car. A driver may notice increased vibration from the engine, especially when idling or accelerating. In severe cases where the mount and its support systems have broken the entire engine could fall out of the bottom of the vehicle. Engine rocking and twisting in front-wheel drive vehicles can be especially problematic because the engine can contact the throttle or shift linkage, inhibiting operation and damaging components.

Radiator Damage

    Problems with damaged engine mounts in rear-wheel drive vehicles with engine-driven radiator fans can cause the fan to contact the sides of the radiator mount, causing damage to the radiator's internal components. Pulleys and drive belts may also be forced to rub aggressively against other engine parts, which rapidly wears them down. This can lead to other engine problems such as timing errors and malfunctioning sensors.

Exhaust Leaks and Joint Damage

    Excessive engine rocking can cause engine pipe connections at the manifold or tail pipe openings to loosen, resulting in exhaust leaks. Seals can also become weakened or torn, along with CV joints at both halfshafts. If the particular mount damaged is an end mount it can create a phenomenon known as "torque steer," which specifically damages the vehicle's CV joints, causing rapid deterioration. If a vehicle's CV joints are extensively damaged a driver will notice a clicking sound emanating from the wheel wells during close turns.

Minggu, 24 Maret 2013

2004 Chevrolet Cavalier Engine Troubleshooting

2004 Chevrolet Cavalier Engine Troubleshooting

A 2004 Chevrolet Cavalier has an On-Board Diagnostic system routinely monitoring the engine. It runs a series of checks, and once a problem is detected, the computer assigns it an alpha-numeric code. At first, this problem code is classified as "pending," but if the issue keeps occuring, that classification changes to "trouble." As a result, the check engine light comes on. Accessing these codes can be a great help while trying to troubleshoot the Cavalier's engine. If anything, it call tell you where to start looking.

Instructions

    1

    Feel under the dashboard for the diagnostic Data Link Connection. The DLC will be directly under the steering column.

    2

    Attach your scanner's cable to the DLC. If your particular scanner is not preprogrammed to self activate, you will need to switch your scanner on.

    3

    Insert your key into the Cavalier's ignition and turn to "On." Some scanners may need the engine cranked as well. Always defer to your particular scanner's manual, in terms of operational procedure.

    4

    Key in a "Read" command, if your scanner is not preprogrammed to automatically retrieve them once a connection is sensed.

    5

    Read the codes on the scanner's screen. You scanner will differentiate between what is "trouble" and what is "pending." Make a list of the codes on a sheet of paper, starting with the trouble codes. Always attend to those codes first. Then, follow that up with all the pending codes.

    6

    Consult a list of OBD-II codes and what they mean. The generic codes universal to all OBD-II compliant cars should be listed in your scanner's manual. The General Motors vehicle family also has special supplemental codes, and those will have to be looked up online.

    7

    Shut down the Cavalier's electrical system and engine. Unplug the scanner from the DLC. Pop the hood, and look into the Cavalier's engine compartment. Your prioritized list of codes should give you the exact places to begin further investigation.

Sabtu, 23 Maret 2013

Does a Bad Oxygen Sensor Decrease Gas Mileage?

The average engine is a beast with 10,000 inward-turned eyes, a nearly omniscient organism fully obsessed with its own internal condition. The oxygen sensor is one of your engine's primary tools of self-diagnosis; without it, the computer goes from a state of zen-like efficiency to a state of child-like confusion. Count on it: temper tantrums shall ensue.

O2 Sensor Basics

    An oxygen sensor is essentially a temperature probe -- a thermometer. Engines work by combining air and fuel in a very specific (stoichiometric) fuel ratio, typically about 14 parts air to one part fuel. Engines need this specific ratio because it provides enough air to burn the fuel, but leaves a little fuel leftover to carry heat away from the cylinder. In a gasoline engine, a "lean" condition -- where there's too much air -- will increase exhaust gas temperatures, while a "rich" mixture -- too much fuel -- will drop the temperatures.

Computer Function

    An O2 sensor reads the exhaust gas temperatures, and the computer extrapolates from that data to deduce the engine's current air/fuel ratio. The computer's basic job is to perform a delicate balancing act, introducing just enough air and fuel to keep the ratio where it should be. The computer usually operates in "closed loop" setup, where it gets data about air and fuel going into the engine, and the ratio of air and fuel coming out. If the oxygen sensor malfunctions, then the computer will go into "open loop" mode, flying blind and using its best guess to keep the engine running.

Front O2 Sensor Failure

    The front O2 sensor -- the one on the engine-side of the catalytic converter -- is the one that the computer uses to adjust air and fuel ratio. An O2 sensor is the only sensor on your car that produces its own voltage, and it does so by (basically) converting heat to electricity. The voltage variance from one extreme to the other is tiny, and any malfunction in the front sensor will ultimately throw the computer into open loop mode. Since lean mixtures are hotter and more dangerous to the engine, the computer will adopt a much more conservative, fuel-rich mixture to keep temperatures down. The end result is a noticeable drop in power and fuel economy.

Rear O2 Sensor Failure

    The O2 sensor mounted just past the catalytic converter doesn't monitor the engine itself, but a failure here will create the same end result. Part of a converter's job is to burn off whatever unburned fuel comes out of the engine, which creates a massive amount of heat. Thus, the gases coming out of a cat are far leaner and hotter than those going in. If the rear O2 sensor fails, your engine will assume that something's gone wrong with the cat and will go into a "limp home" mode till you get it fixed. Limp home mode is kind of a nasty trick on the part of vehicle manufacturers, a state wherein the engine will run just well enough for you to get home to fix the converter. Limp home mode will typically create a massive drop in power and fuel economy; enough to convince you to fix the converter ASAP.

Repair

    Most computers will self-diagnose and spit out a trouble code to tell you that there's been a malfunction in the O2 sensor. But don't believe it; an "O2 sensor malfunction" code only tells you that the sensor's readings are way out of range, and that they're reading lean or rich. That malfunction code could easily indicate another problem -- one causing a run-lean or rich condition in the engine. Before you go replacing the O2 sensor, make sure that you've properly diagnosed the engine to make sure that it isn't a sensor failure, vacuum leak, air channel clog or fuel system malfunction.

What Is Wrong When My Oil Level Fluctuates With the Gas Pedal?

Your car's engine represents a confluence of several technologies and systems, with each affecting another in some way. Although your car's air and fuel systems make it go, the hydraulic oiling system is what keeps it going. Oil level fluctuations don't necessarily mean anything serious, but under certain circumstances such fluctuations can be a harbinger of impending failure.

Oiling System Basics

    Almost all engines use a wet-sump, gravity-return oiling system. A wet-sump system uses an oil pump to suck lubricant out of a sump, or reservoir, at the bottom of the engine. The pump pressurizes the oil and sends it through the engine's oil galleries, or channels, so that it can travel to the bearings and valvetrain. Much of the oil eventually works its way up to the top of the engine, where it drains back to the sump through a series of holes and channels.

Normal Fluctuation

    A certain amount of oil level fluctuation is normal; the amount varies by engine size, type and cylinder count. Almost all production engines use hydraulic lifters or cam adjusters that contain a plunger or cylinder. As engine rpm rises, the oil pressure increases and the lifters fill up with oil to push the valves open further. While individual lifter/adjuster displacement is fairly small -- typically about 1/2 oz. per lifter -- the engine uses at least two of them per cylinder. As such, the lifters on a typical V-8 engine can pull an extra 8 oz. of oil out of the sump at high rpm.

Drainback Problems

    If the engine's oil drain-back packages become clogged with sludge, oil will get trapped in the top of the engine and fail to return to the sump. Depending on the size of the passages and the severity of the clogging, the oil might take a few extra seconds to return to the sump or it may not return at all. Slow oil flow is a precursor to complete drainback failure, which is a very bad thing for your engine. Inline engines are somewhat more prone to this type of failure than V-configured engines, which tend to have more and larger drainback holes.

Treatment

    A complete system flush is the only way to eliminate the sludge clogging your drainback holes. It generally takes at least 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch of sludge build-up to clog drainback holes to the point that they affect the oil level, so you'll probably need to run a very powerful oil-flushing solvent through the system multiple times before the problem goes away. Pour some oil-flushing solvent into your engine, then drive it as you normally would for about 20 miles. Drain the oil and change the filter, then replace the oil with cheap 0W-20 weight motor oil and more solvent. Allow the car to sit at a fast idle to about 20 minute, but do not drive it. Drain the oil; repeat this flushing/refilling procedure with 0W-20 oil and solvent until the oil no longer looks like black syrup while draining. Once the oil comes out clean, replace it with a high-mileage synthetic oil and new filter. Here's a tip: to set your car at a fast idle, slide two or three nickels between the throttle bracket on your carb/throttle body and the throttle-stoop plate or adjusting screw.

How to Troubleshoot the Turn Signal in a 1998 Chevy S-10

The turn signal on your Chevy S-10 operates by an electrical signal sent from the battery that is activated by a switch on the steering column. The line feeds through a signal relay that operates like an automatic on/off switch, which then goes to the turn lamp to either turn it on or off. The fuse panel for a 1998 Chevrolet S-10 is located beneath the dash to the side of the steering column. Troubleshooting a problem turn signal starts with checking the fuses.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the fuse panel cover and locate the fuse for the front and rear turn signals. The backside of the cover gives a listing of the specific location for each fuse. Replace any damaged fuses, indicated by a disconnected center wire, burn marks or cracks.

    2

    Turn the vehicle on and activate the turn signal.

    3

    Replace the turn signal bulb if the front or rear flashes rapidly without the other one flashing. Replace the relay if the signal activates the light but does not turn it off. The relay switches are two cylindrical plugs, one for each side of the vehicle. The switches are located beneath the dash adjacent to the power outlet. You will have to remove the bolts along the underside of the dash to pull it back. The relays are to the left of the power outlet on the frame, and they just plug into place.

    4

    Turn the other signal on. Replace the actual switch if neither side lights up at all. Replace only the relay if one side lights up fine and the other side does nothing.

My 1987 Toyota Camry Back Up Lights Won't Work

The back up lights are very important for the safety of your 1987 Toyota Camry. Not only do they help prevent against accidents, but driving your Camry with a faulty back up light can result in a fix-it ticket from the local authorities. It is important to repair the back up lights as soon as they burn out. The most common cause of a faulty back up light is a burnt-out bulb, but loose connectors and broken fuses are also probable causes.

Instructions

Burnt-out Bulb

    1

    Turn off the engine and open the trunk.

    2

    Remove the two screws from behind the tail lamp assembly with a Phillips head screwdriver.

    3

    Disconnect the electrical connector from the rear of the assembly and pull the assembly out of the vehicle.

    4

    Remove the back up lamp socket by rotating it counterclockwise. Pull the old bulb out of the socket and install a new one, being careful not to touch the glass portion of the bulb. Place the socket back into the assembly by rotating it clockwise. Reinstall the assembly into the vehicle and reattach the electrical connector.

    5

    Reinstall the two screws and close the trunk.

Loose Connection

    6

    Repeat Steps 1 and 2 above.

    7

    Pull the assembly out of the vehicle and tug on the electrical connector located at the rear of the assembly. If it comes out, securely plug it into the assembly.

    8

    Place the assembly back into the vehicle and reattach the two screws. Close the trunk.

Broken Fuse

    9

    Turn off the engine and open the hood.

    10

    Remove the cover panel from the fuse box located behind the radiator. Locate the fuse labeled "Tail Lamp." If the fuse is broken, it will have to be replaced. A fuse is broken if the metal piece inside the fuse is damaged.

    11

    Pull the fuse out of the fuse box and replace it with a new 10A fuse.

    12

    Replace the cover panel onto the fuse box and close the hood.

Kamis, 21 Maret 2013

Compression Problems in a 1994 Ford Aerostar

Compression Problems in a 1994 Ford Aerostar

The 1994 Ford Aerostar has more than 70 technical service bulletins (TSBs) on the van, and some of these bulletins concern engine compression problems. A TSB is published by the manufacturer and sent to the Ford dealership maintenance departments informing them of problems found in a vehicle. Compression problems in the Aerostar can be determined when the Ford begins to idle roughly, misses during operation or has problems with the engine turning over.

Engine Noise

    One of the symptoms of a compression problem on the 1994 Ford Aerostar is engine noise. A TSB published by the manufacturer states that this engine noise is due to a rod bearing that can create a compression problem in one of the cylinders. A faulty rod bearing limits the compression in one of the engine's cylinders, causing the engine to stall or miss during operation. The Aerostar owner needs to take the van into the dealership to have a compression test performed to determine if a rod bearing is causing a low compression problem.

Exhaust System

    A TSB was published by the manufacturer concerning an exhaust system problem on the 1994 Ford Aerostar. This TSB states that noise from the exhaust system is an indication of a compression problem in the van. The noise comes from a loose or bad exhaust valve that causes low compression in one of the Aerostar's cylinders. The cylinder cannot release fumes into the exhaust system, which creates the noise. The Ford must be taken into the dealership before this faulty exhaust valve blows a head gasket.

Blown Head Gasket

    A blown head gasket occurs when pressure in the cylinders builds up and has no place to release this pressure. When a head gasket blows or leaks, it causes the two adjoining cylinders to lose compression. This compression problem shows up when oil begins to blow onto engine components, and the Aerostar's engine begins to idle roughly or dies when coming to a stop. A TSB is published by the manufacturer concerning an improperly calculated power-train control module that can also cause the same compression problems in the Aerostar. The only correction for this problem is to have the head gasket replaced or the power-train module programmed correctly.

What Are Signs of Bad Outer Tie Rods?

What Are Signs of Bad Outer Tie Rods?

Tie rods are part of the steering mechanism on a car. The tie rods often become worn out after several years of use and will need to be replaced. The symptoms and signs of a bad outer tie rod is vibrations, noise, tire movement and loose steering. All of these symptoms may man that a tie rod needs to be replaced quickly.

Noise

    When your tie rods have gone bad, you will begin to hear a grinding noise. This will happen when you are turning your steering wheel one direction or another. It may specifically be the tie rods that are bad when the wheel is vibrating loud and fast when you are driving on the highway.

Tire Movement

    You can check the outer tie rods by jacking the car up and grabbing the bottom of the tire with both of your hands. Start by lifting it straight up and seeing how much play there is. There should be very minimal movement. If it is very loose, then there may be worn out tie rods.

Steering

    The last way to know if you have bad outer tie rods is to pay attention to the steering. If the steering has a slow reaction or the car is pulling to one side erratically, the tie rods may be worn out. Also, the steering should not feel loose and ready to slide either way on the road.

What Causes Headlights to Flicker?

What Causes Headlights to Flicker?

Flickering headlights can get you a ticket to the policeman's ball, but more importantly, they may indicate trouble inside your car. This problem can result from many potential causes, but whatever the reason, you must identify and address it before your lights go out altogether.

Battery Problems

    If your car's battery is putting out insufficient voltage, the headlights may flicker because they're not getting enough power, which may result from loose or corroded battery cable connections. Cleaning the cables and the battery terminals with a wire brush may solve the problem. Check all the ground cables to ensure they are connected securely.

Loose or Faulty Wires

    A short in the wiring, or a loose wiring connection around your headlights, can cause them to flicker. Inspect the wiring going to the bulb for damage, or a loose connection. Check to see that the headlight bulb isn't loose, and check the light switch on the dash.

Competing Power Draw

    Sometimes another process in your car competes with the headlights for power and causes them to flicker or dim while it's running. For example, if you've installed a non-factory sound system that needs a lot of power, your lights may dim while you're running it because it's taking more than its share. Car owners have also reported their headlights dimming when they activate a power window or a sunroof.

How to Check Out My Auto's Air Conditioning for Repairs

How to Check Out My Auto's Air Conditioning for Repairs

Automotive air conditioning is primarily for passenger comfort, but can also clear window interiors by removing humidity almost instantly. Poor performance will detract from the benefits normally provided and can adversely affect interior fabrics and components. Some malfunctions can misplace water into the auto interior and ruin carpeting. Avoid an unnecessary repair bill by performing some easy preliminary checks.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood and check the system drain outlet for blockage. Drain blockage could direct condensation to the interior or cause evaporator flooding. Locate the system drain nipple on the passenger side firewall. The drain nipple is usually made of rubber and could be clogged by leaves or other debris. Clear any debris found and monitor the drain for flow after the system has been active for awhile. Look for a small puddle under the car that signifies proper drain operation.

    2
    The recirculation setting allows the coldest vent temperatures.
    The recirculation setting allows the coldest vent temperatures.

    Position a fan to blow into the grille of the car at a high setting. Insert the thermometer into a center vent outlet and close all other vents, if possible. Activate the system and select the coldest settings and highest blower speed. Close all doors and windows and monitor the thermometer. The discharged air should reach optimum temperature in a few minutes depending on the initial interior heat. Rev the engine slightly above idle speed if the system fails to reach at least 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Refrigerant replenishment may be indicated by a sharp response to acceleration.

    3

    Check the under-hood system sight-glass, if so equipped. Low refrigerant levels are indicated by foaming in the sight-glass. Check the compressor drive belt action for chirping or skipping. Replace any belt that exhibits such behavior, or fails a visual inspection with cracking or fraying detected. Feel the compressor outlet pipe for a few seconds and note the temperature. Anything less than frigid temps might indicate a weak compressor or low refrigerant level. Inspect system hoses for bubbles, cracks or oil seepage. Have defective parts replaced professionally.

    4

    Operate all vent options and blower speeds and note system function. Poor performance here might require professional diagnosis to determine faults. Blower malfunctions can be caused by a simple resistor or an expensive computer module. Proper diagnosis is critical. Imprecise air flow direction might require dashboard removal and should be diagnosed by a professional with expertise in this area.

    5

    Check the condenser cooling fan for proper operation. Electric fans might cycle on and off while clutch style fans should be engaged at vehicle operating temperatures. Lack of proper condenser cooling fan performance is indicated by poor air conditioning cooling at low speeds and at idle. Highway speeds negate the need for the cooling fans and system operation will return to normal until speed is reduced.

How to Determine if the Heads Are Cracked on a Motor

A crack in the cylinder head can lead to extensive engine problems. Various issues can result from a cracked cylinder head -- usually coolant, oil and vacuum leaks. Diagnosing these issues immediately is necessary to ensure the continued performance of your engine. Many of the issues stemming from a cracked cylinder head will activate the "check engine" light on the dashboard. This allows for easy diagnostic via an engine control unit (ECU) code reader.

Instructions

    1

    Check the dashboard of your vehicle to see if the "check engine" light is illuminated. If so, plug a diagnostic reader into the ECU access port. This port is most often located underneath the interior dashboard area. Once plugged in, the diagnostic reader will give you a list of all the error codes recorded by the ECU, as well as a brief description of the malfunction.

    2

    Check the diagnostic error codes for issues originating in the cylinder head. These issues may include low coolant, overheating, low oil pressure and vacuum pressure leaks. In the case of cylinder head cracks, these issues stem from the fact that motor oil and coolant is able to leak through the cracks into the engine cylinders.

    3

    Ensure the engine is cooled down entirely. Then open the hood, and visually inspect the cylinder heads and surrounding engine area for signs of fluid buildup. Severe cracks may lead to external leakage of motor oil and coolant, so spotting a fluid buildup on or around the cylinder heads is an indication that a crack has formed.

    4

    Clean the exterior of the cylinder heads with a degreaser solution, and wipe them clean. Carefully inspect the cylinder heads for any visual signs of cracking. Due to dirt and debris buildup, cracks are hard to spot when the engine is dirty. However, once cleaned, it is possible to locate external cracks through careful inspection.

    5

    Look for the presence of white smoke emitting from the exhaust when the engine is under acceleration. White smoke generally indicates that coolant is being combusted in the engine cylinders, which could be caused by a cracked cylinder head.

How to Test Sealed Batteries

Also known as a maintenance-free battery, a sealed battery works in the same basic manner as a traditional wet cell, or unsealed, battery. Like an unsealed battery, a sealed car battery still contains electrolytes. However, you cannot refill a sealed battery with fluids to replenish the electrolyte level. Because it's sealed, you are also not able to test this type of battery with a hydrometer. Rather, a digital voltmeter, which can be purchased for as little as $20, will be needed.

Instructions

    1

    Remove any type of terminal covers on the sealed battery. You must be able to access both the negative and positive terminals. Also check your voltmeter to ensure it is set to the DC power scale and 12 volts.

    2

    Attach the digital voltmeter's leads to the sealed battery. The positive lead must be securely connected to the positive terminal and the negative lead securely affixed to the negative terminal.

    3

    Observe the voltage readout displayed on the digital voltmeter. If your sealed battery is fully charged, the readout should be approximately 12.8 or 12.9 volts. A reading that is extremely low, such as 10.0 to 11.0, may indicate a shorted cell. In this case, a new battery is likely needed. A reading in the 11.0 to 12.0 range means the battery is low and needs recharging.

    4

    Recharge the sealed battery if necessary. Use a 12-volt battery charger, set on a low amp-rate, to slowly recharge the battery. Depending on the severity of the battery's discharge, the time to fully charge may be anywhere from a few hours to a full day. Check the battery charger often to ensure the battery is charging correctly.

    5

    Turn on the vehicle's headlights for about five minutes after the battery has been fully charged. Then turn the lights off and wait about 10 minutes. This will remove the surface charge, which could interfere with the accuracy of the test. If the sealed battery has been removed from the vehicle, allow the battery to rest for anywhere between two and eight hours to remove the surface charge.

    6

    Retest the sealed battery by connecting your digital voltmeter in the same manner as before. If the reading is low once again, the sealed battery is not capable of holding a charge and needs replacing.

Rabu, 20 Maret 2013

The Causes of Soft Brake Pedals on an Accord

Hydraulic braking systems are fairly simple in principle. The purpose of any hydraulic system is to transfer power imparted at the source -- your foot, in this case -- to the slave cylinder, the brake caliper. A soft brake pedal could indicate a number of different faults, all of which amount to a drop in total system pressure and a failure to transfer pressure.

Low Fluid or Air in the Lines

    Hydraulic brakes are sealed systems, meaning that they require a solid "stack" of hydraulic fluid to develop pressure. Hydrraulic systems differ from pneumatic systems because fluids are incompressible, meaning that all of the force that goes into the brake pedal will eventually express somewhere. Air in the lines will compress instead of transferring motion, acting like a spring instead of a solid link. Low fluid levels reduce braking pressure by depriving the brakes of a solid surface to push against. Instead of pushing the slave cylinder pistons, the master cylinder will waste precious motion on compressing air where there should be fluid, resulting in a soft or spongy pedal.

Internal and External Leaks

    If your brake pedal seems firm at first and then slowly sinks to the floor, then there's a good chance that there's a leak in your master or slave cylinders. Pressure will quickly build in the cylinder when you stab the brake pedal, but gradually fall off once fluid starts to work past the leak. You'll know right away if it's a leak in the slave cylinders or lines, because fluid will dribble out and end up on your driveway. Internal leaks in the master cylinder will allow fluid pressure to work backward from the high-pressure chamber to the low-pressure chamber; a bad master cylinder will act just like an external fluid leak, but without the telltale puddle or loss of fluid.

ABS Accumulator

    Hondas of this vintage use an ABS accumulator, which is a sort of reservoir that keeps a bit of fluid pressure in reserve for emergency braking situations. The ABS system relies on steady pressure from the accumulator, and malfunctions here may well manifest as a soft brake pedal. The ABS accumulator is the reason that your brakes are still fairly soft and useable even after you shut the ignition off and deprive the brake booster of vacuum. With the ignition off, you should get 15 to 20 brake applications before the pedal firms up. If it does anything else, then the accumulator is bad and you need to replace it. An accumulator fault will typically trigger a fault code and an ABS warning light on your dashboard.

Other ABS Faults

    A bad ABS fluid pressure sensor could be sending your ABS fluid pump incorrect information, and a bad pump will reduce pedal firmness as well. The ABS pump is what pressurizes your fluid accumulator, and you can hear it run with a soft whir once the pressure drops. To test the pump, turn the ignition off and fully discharge the accumulator by pumping the pedal about 30 times; check the fluid level now that it's all returned to the reservoir and look for leaks. Turn the ignition key on without starting the car and listen for your ABS pump. The sensor should have detected a low-pressure condition and triggered the pump to bring it back up to pressure.

Fixing Pump Faults

    If you diagnose a pump fault, you may want to try cleaning it out before replacing it. Brake fluid can go bad over time, especially if it's been overheated. Bad brake fluid will turn into a sludge that clogs your pump and accumulator channels. After you clean or replace the components, flush the system and replace the old fluid with new fluid rated for your car.

Selasa, 19 Maret 2013

How to Tell When Hydraulic Lifters Go Bad

How to Tell When Hydraulic Lifters Go Bad

The hydraulic lifters in your car or truck's engine are an essential part of your vehicle. The lifters move up and down inside the block, helping generate the compression and power your car needs to run. If a lifter fails, your car or truck will not run properly and may exhibit any of several different side effects. Lifter problems cannot be repaired without rebuilding or replacing the engine on your vehicle, and such problems are typically caused by running the vehicle low on oil or overheating the engine.

Instructions

    1

    Check your engine oil. Add oil if necessary, making note of how much oil you have had to add. It is important to know how much oil is in your vehicle when you are trying to determine the condition of the engine and the hydraulic lifters. You may notice that the engine has low oil pressure on the oil gauge when it is running.

    2

    Look at the vehicle's mileage and maintenance history. High mileage vehicles are far more likely to experience problems with the engines and lifters, as are those that have been routinely run low on oil or experienced an extreme loss of engine lubrication due to a non-functioning oil pump or other problem.

    3

    Start the vehicle. If the vehicle is hard to start, it can be a sign that it is not firing properly on all cylinders and that there may be a problem with a seized up or broken hydraulic lifter in the engine.

    4

    Notice whether the vehicle's check engine light is on. If the check engine light has come on, attach the vehicle's computer to an error code reader and diagnose the error codes that are generated. In some vehicles, a failing or broken lifter will generate a corresponding error code in the vehicle's computer system.

    5

    Listen to the engine run. Loud banging, knocking or tapping noises may be a sign of a bad lifter. Noises are typically caused by worn out lifters coming into contact with other engine components or a lack of lubrication.

    6

    Take the vehicle to a mechanic and have it formally diagnosed. In some cases, the mechanic may have to take the top end of the engine apart to identify the exact lifter that is failing and the cause of the failure.

Senin, 18 Maret 2013

How to Identify Carburetors on a 1987 Toyota Corolla

How to Identify Carburetors on a 1987 Toyota Corolla

1987 was the first year Toyota introduced the Corolla. The 1987 Corolla was equipped with both a 1.6-liter, carbureted 4-cylinder, or a 1.6-liter fuel injected, in-line 4-cylinder. The carburetor is located on top of the engine, and regulates the fuel to air ratio. Identifying the carburetor on the 1987 Corolla is a matter of accessing the carburetor, and reading the numbers inscribed on the carburetor. This project should take about 10 minutes, depending upon the level of mechanical skill involved.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood of the Corolla. Turn the wing nut at the top of the air cleaner to remove the nut. The air cleaner is the cylindrical piece on the top center of the Corolla engine. Remove the air cleaner mounting nut and then remove the air cleaner.

    2

    Spray a small amount of engine parts cleaner on a clean rag. Rub the back of the carburetor, on the vertical side of the body. The rear side of the 1987 Corolla carburetor is where the identification number is stamped.

    3

    Visually inspect the rear side of the carburetor, or the side facing the back of the Corolla. Look for a series of numbers. Write the number down, stamped on the rear of the carburetor.

How to Replace the Climate Board in a 2000 Monte Carlo SS

The 2000 Chevy Monte Carlo SS uses a manual climate control board. This board is part of the climate control system. It allows you to adjust the interior air temperature and turn on the fan. The board is beneath the factory radio. It is only mounted in the dash by simple screws; however, to access the screws, you'll need to remove the front dash panel.

Instructions

    1

    Disconnect the Monte Carlo SS's negative battery cable with a pair of pliers then wait five minutes for the backup power system to discharge.

    2

    Open the passenger side door and remove the fuse cover from the end of the dash. Inside, you'll find a bolt. Remove it with a socket wrench.

    3

    Pry off the circular panel around the dash ignition cylinder with a trim stick. Set the panel aside.

    4

    Remove the two Phillips screws from the lower steering column cover, and then pull the cover off.

    5

    Open the glove box and remove the Phillips screw near the left-side hinge.

    6

    Pry around the lower edge of the front dash panel beneath the ignition cylinder. When a portion of the front dash panel comes loose, grasp the exposed edge and pull the panel off with your hands. You'll find a wiring harness for the hazard light switch on the other side. Unplug it and move the panel out of the way.

    7

    Remove the two Phillips screws that mount the climate control board. Pull the unit out and unplug the three connections from the back.

    8

    Plug the connections into the new climate control board and insert the unit into the cavity.

    9

    Reposition the front dash panel along the dash and plug in the hazard switch connection. Push along the edges to snap it back on. Reattach the lower steering column cover and replace the two Phillips screws.

    10

    Replace the glove box Phillips screw. Replace the fuse panel bolt and the fuse panel cover.

    11

    Snap the ignition cylinder panel back into place and then reconnect the negative battery cable.

Minggu, 17 Maret 2013

How to Test the Chevrolet HHR

The Chevrolet HHR employs a second-generation on-board diagnostic system that monitors and controls the entire power train. In the event of a malfunction within the engine, transmission, engine management system, fuel system or emissions system, the brain of the diagnostic system, known as the ECM, will generate a diagnostic code and trigger the check-engine light. When the light comes on, this is your signal to have the HHR tested to read the code(s) as the first step in diagnosing and repairing the issue.

Instructions

    1

    Sit down in the HHR's driver seat with the code reader, pen and paper. Look under the driver's side dashboard for the diagnostic port, a small rectangular-shaped connection port that somewhat resembles a computer printer cable end.

    2

    Plug the code reader's data-link cable into the HHR's diagnostic port. Put the HHR's ignition key in the ignition and turn it to the run position.

    3

    Follow the code reader's specific operating guide for performing a quick test on your HHR's ECM. Follow the prompts on the code reader's LED screen to read the code(s) from the ECM.

    4

    Write down the code(s) with your pen and paper.

    5

    Complete the quick test per your code reader's specific operator's guide. Disconnect the data-link cable from the diagnostic port and shut off the ignition.

How to Troubleshoot Mitsubishi Endeavor Headlights That are Not Working

If the headlights on your Mitsubishi Endeavor are not working, one of four main electrical components may have failed: the headlight bulbs themselves; the headlight wiring harness that feeds electricity to the headlights; the fuse, which protects components on the circuit from surge damage; or the headlight switch, which allows the driver to change between the low and high beams. Any one of these components may be the reason why your Mitsubishi Endeavor headlights are not turning on.

Instructions

    1

    Turn on the headlights on your Mitsubishi Endeavor. Replace whichever headlight is not turning on. If none of the headlights are turning on, skip to step 4. Prop open the hood. Press in on the side tabs of the headlight wiring harness to pull off the wiring harness. Disengage the metal retaining clip. Put on your latex gloves. Pull out the non-functioning headlight bulb. Insert a replacement bulb. Resecure with the retaining clip. Plug back in the wiring harness.

    2

    Open the fuse box on the left side of the engine compartment. Pull out the fuse on the headlight wiring circuit that features the non-functioning headlight bulb. Check whether the fuse is blown. Insert a replacement fuse into the fuse slot if the fuse is blown. Turn on the headlights again.

    3

    Unplug the headlight wiring harness. Inspect the wiring harness contacts for discoloration or corrosion. Brush off a corroded surface layer with your eraser. Spread a small amount of dielectric gel over the contacts. Plug the wiring harness back in. Test the headlights. If they still do not turn on, check that power is coming through the wiring harness. Connect the negative lead of the voltmeter to the negative battery terminal. Connect the positive lead of the voltmeter to the positive wire on the wiring harness. If no power is coming through, replace the wiring harness.

    4

    Loosen the negative battery terminal nut with your socket wrench. Lift off the negative battery cable and set it aside. Sit in the driver's side seat. Remove the two screws securing the steering column bezel to the steering column. Unplug the wiring block from the rear of the headlight switch. Inspect the contacts on the wiring block and the headlight switch for corrosion. Brush away corrosion with your eraser. Spread onto the contacts a small amount of dielectric gel to prevent future corrosion. Plug back in the wiring block. Turn on the headlights. If they still do not work, replace the headlight switch. Disconnect the wiring block. Remove the three screws securing the headlight switch to the steering column. Pull off the headlight switch. Insert the replacement switch. Secure it in place with the three screws. Plug back in the wiring block. Turn on the headlights to verify that they now work.

2005 Chevy Blower Problems

The blower is responsible for circulating hot or cool air through your 2005 Chevy. This system uses four main components: fan switch, blower motor resistor, blower motor and blower motor wheel. If any of these components fails, the system will not operate properly.

Fan Switch

    The switch is the user interface for the system and it contains an electronic control. When this switch goes bad, the proper signal does not reach the motor and it will not work at all or only work at certain speeds.

Blower Motor Resistor

    The blower motor resistor is responsible for limiting the amount of electricity that reaches the blower motor. Typically when this fails, the blower will only work on its highest speed setting.

Blower Motor Wheel

    The blower motor wheel is the component that creates the air flow. When this component fails, there will be no air flow at all. Prior to the wheel failing, it typically makes a buzzing or rattling noise.

Blower Motor

    The blower motor is an electric motor that spins the wheel to create the air flow. Just as the blower motor wheel, when this component fails, there will be no air flow.

Types of Auto Diagnostic Scanners

Types of Auto Diagnostic Scanners

A vehicle's dashboard contains a multitude of warning lights. This includes a general "Check Engine" light, as well as malfuction indicators for antilock brakes, tire pressure monitoring sensors, and air bags. Each of these diagnostic systems issues a trouble code once a problem is detected. Accessing these codes requires diagnostic hardware, and professional mechanics have a computer for this purpose. For the general public, however, there are smaller diagnostic code readers available. Each of these tools hook up to the same outlet in a vehicle.

On-Board Diagnostics

    OBD-II covers most engine systems.
    OBD-II covers most engine systems.

    Using an on-board diagnostics (OBD) code reader depends on the year a vehicle was manufactured. Vehicles manufactured after 1996 go by OBD-II codes, whereas earlier cars and trucks go by OBD-I codes, and those codes can vary by manufacturer. OBD scanners cover a lot of areas in the vehicle, but particularly the engine and the fuel system. The fault codes can go from the drastic to the easy fix; parts of your engine may need more than routine maintenance or your gas cap might be broken.

Brakes

    Always diagnose brake problems immediately.
    Always diagnose brake problems immediately.

    Some scanners may be compatible with other diagnostic systems, but many of the cheaper ones are not. A basic OBD-II scanner will not read codes for antilock braking systems (ABS). While OBD-II scanners cover most vehicles manufactured after 1996, many of the ABS code readers cover only certain vehicles. When researching a possible code reader purchase, it is wise to consider the vehicles it can be used with and make certain the hardware is compatible.

Tire Pressure Monitoring System

    Maintaining the right tire pressure will enhance gas mileage.
    Maintaining the right tire pressure will enhance gas mileage.

    Tire pressure monitoring systems (TPMS) are not widely used as OBD-II codes, but soon will be. The Department of Transportation has mandated that all cars manufactured after 2008 be equipped with TPMS sensors. Although these monitors are no substitute for regularly checking tire pressure by hand, they can give a driver ample warning that there is a problem with a tire, which can help avoid a flat or a blowout. A TPMS scanner works very much the same way as OBD-II and ABS code readers. It interacts with a vehicle's computer, reads the trouble code, and can lead to a diagnosis.

Air Bags

    Air bags operate under the supplemental restraint system (SRS). Diagnostic tools for SRS trouble codes are scarcer than ABS readers. Of the few that are available, they tend to be specific to manufacturers, like BMW. Also, like the braking system, if there is a problem with air bags, it's best to leave the repair work to a trained professional. Air bags can require complex maintenance and be costly to fix, so reverse engineering a casual mistake can become expensive.

Multi-Use Scanners and Laptops

    Diagnostics with a laptop allows for easier updating and upgrading as coding changes.
    Diagnostics with a laptop allows for easier updating and upgrading as coding changes.

    Technology develops at a pace that favors integration. Some day, diagnostic code scanners may become all-in-one tools. So instead of owning several readers, a home mechanic would have one tool for OBD, ABS, TPMS and other trouble codes. There are already several scanners that can multitask. Actron's CP9580 Auto Scanner, for example, can read both OBD and ABS codes. Presently, the more expensive the piece of hardware, the more access to vehicle diagnostics. Also, there is a way to bypass scanners altogether. A home mechanic can buy and download software packages and turn a laptop into a multilingual scan tool. However, a diagnostic cable with both a USB and a 16-pin data link connector would have to be purchased separately.

Data Link Connection

    No matter the diagnostic system, interfacing with a vehicle's diagnostic system requires access to the data link connection (DLC) in a vehicle. The only exception to this is with certain SRS scanners that require opening the vehicle's hood and locating a special 20-pin outlet. The regular DLC port's location, however, can vary by make and model of the vehicle but is usually located on the driver's side of the vehicle beneath the dashboard between the gas pedal and the trunk release. Once a diagnostic tool is attached, the hardware and the vehicle need to be turned on. The scanner will do the rest and automatically retrieve any awaiting trouble code.

Understanding Trouble Codes

    A scanner's user manual should contain all the generic trouble code definitions as outlined by the Society of Automotive Engineers. Some codes, however, may be specific to a vehicle manufacturer, and definitions will likely not be available in a vehicle's owner manual. There are many websites on the Internet that can assist with finding code definitions, if you have lost your manual or cannot find the information you need.

Troubleshooting a Digital Dash

Troubleshooting a Digital Dash

Advanced digital dash board technology allows auto makers to manufacture instrument clusters and controls that can be cheaply customized for the market that the vehicle is sold in. For example, a dash can be electronically changed from metric to imperial units, or from one language to another with relative ease. Many dash problems that you may encounter can be related to these issues. Other problems can be related to visibility. Correct these issues by following a few troubleshooting steps.

Instructions

    1

    Press the "Setup," "Menu" or similarly labeled button on the electronic vehicle information center, or EVIC, that's often embedded in the instrument cluster if the language or units are wrong. Then press the arrow keys and select custom settings like languages and units. Then press the "Enter" or similarly labeled button to memorize the setting.

    2

    Make adjustments to the illumination settings if you can't read certain elements like the speedometer. Certain displayed items will be too dim under certain light conditions. Look for a rheostat dimmer control located near the instrument cluster, or one incorporated into the interior lights dimmer switch which may be located near the main exterior head light switch. Adjust it until you can see the digital dash properly.

    3

    Change the fuse if elements in the digital dash don't work at all. Fuse panels can be located in the engine compartment, under the steering wheel or in the trunk. Open the cover and identify the relevant fuse---it will be labeled. Change the fuse out with one of the same amperage and color.

Sabtu, 16 Maret 2013

Signs & Symptoms of a Bad Thermostat on a Vehicle

Signs & Symptoms of a Bad Thermostat on a Vehicle

A bad thermostat can play havoc with a car's engine and its coolant system. Thermostats can malfunction for different reasons, but the most prevalent is when it loses its ability to respond to the proper temperature -- generally somewhere between 185 and 220 degrees F, depending upon the make and model of the vehicle -- and doesn't open or close sufficiently. An old-fashioned method to test the thermostat is to place it briefly in boiling water and check if the coil or spring activates or moves the plate. Most thermostats cost under $10, but a timely replacement of a malfunctioning one can save you from roadside breakdowns, blown head gaskets, warped heads and thousands of dollars in repair costs.

Temperature Gauge

    Paying attention to the temperature gauge on the dashboard of the car is important when you suspect a potentially malfunctioning thermostat. If you notice odd swings on the temperature gauge or halting movements, this is often caused by a failing thermostat -- this condition manifests itself as a stop-and-start on the gauge, with sudden, wild swings into the higher regions.

Overheating

    If the vehicle continually overheats and you've eliminated a malfunctioning temperature sensor, the cooling fan and its sensor, the radiator, the water pump as causes, and none of the hoses show any sign of leaking, then the last place to look is the thermostat. Sometimes if the car experiences a few episodes of overheating due to low coolant or a ill-fitting radiator cap, this can cause the thermostat to fail. Overheating may ruin the thermostat's ability to open or close at the preset temperature for the vehicle.

Gas Mileage Drop

    If you notice a gas mileage drop and no heat coming from the heater, this is a good indication that the thermostat is stuck in the open position. While thermostats don't just fail, over time they can lose their ability to respond to the temperatures of the engine and stick in the open position. This causes gas to not burn fully and to condense in the cylinders, resulting in a drop in gas mileage.

Removing and Replacing the Thermostat

    Most thermostats sit inside a metal housing on the engine, attaching to an inlet hose coming directly from the radiator. With its rounded shape and two bolts that hold it to the engine, it's relatively easy to spot. Replacing it is quick; the hardest part, depending on the vehicle model, is reaching it and removing the bolts that hold it in place. Because it is subject to continual heating and cooling, the expansion and contraction often make the bolts hard to remove. Add an extender to your ratchet to unscrew the bolts more easily. Remove the housing, scrape off any gasket material, add a new gasket and sealer and replace the thermostat. There is only one way it installs correctly, so ensure you don't reverse it, or the thermostat won't work right. Some engines have a line-up notch. There is often an arrow which points in the direction of opening and water flow.

Honda Civic Trunk Latch Problems

Honda Civic Trunk Latch Problems

The Honda Civic has consumer complaints and technical service bulletins (TSB) published concerning multiple problems with the trunk latch. The trunk latch problems are not all mechanical issues; there are electrical issues as well as keyless entry device problems. All the trunk latch problems prevent the trunk from opening or closing.

Mechanical Problem

    The Honda Civic has a TSB published by the manufacturer concerning the trunk latch problems some owners are experiencing. The trunk latch remains in the open position, which prevents the trunk from remaining closed. Once the operator opens the trunk with the key, the trunk latch sticks in the open position. This is attributed to a mechanical issue with the trunk latch assembly. Civic owners can lubricate the latch assembly, but this does not always work. If lubrication of the latch does not correct the problem, the entire latch assembly must be replaced.

Keyless Entry Device

    The keyless entry device which controls the locks on the Honda Civic is causing the trunk latch to lock and unlock automatically without operator use of the device. A signal is sent to the door locks and the trunk locks, causing the locks to open. This signal problem is attributed to a programming problem on the Honda Civic. The only correction for the keyless device problem on the Civic is to have both the keyless entry device and the automobile computer re-programmed. The only other cure for this latch problem is to replace the keyless entry device.

Electrical Problems

    Problems with the electrical system which controls the automatic door locks and trunk locks on the Honda Civic have also been reported. The wiring is shorting out the cabin controls and causing the trunk to unlatch and open during normal driving conditions. Civics with this problem need to be taken to the dealership to have the wiring for the trunk latch and power door locks rewired.

How to Troubleshoot a 1993 Oldsmobile 88 That Will Turn Over But Not Start

An engine needs fuel, air, compression and spark to start. From a technician's point of view and for expedience, the diagnosis will start with the most likely cause and progress to the next most likely and so on. The most likely causes are the fuel pump, followed by the ignition. The ignition on a 1993 Oldsmobile is a wasted spark coil pack type ignition consisting of a crank sensor and an ignition control module with three coil packs mounted on top. The coil packs are located on the passenger side of the engine on the top of the valve cover.

Instructions

    1

    Check the fuses in the fuse relay box on the driver's side fenderwell. Always check the fuses first. Replace as necessary. Loosen the clamp on the air duct leading to the throttle body using the screwdriver. Pull the air duct off the throttle body and push it out of the way. Open the throttle plate by pushing the throttle linkage back on the side of the throttle body. Squirt a two-second shot of carburetor cleaner into the throttle body after which release the throttle linkage.

    2

    Attempt to start the engine. If the engine starts and runs for a second or more, the fuel pump has failed. The fuel pump is located in the fuel tank.

    3

    Check the ignition for fire at the plugs. Pull one of the spark plug wires and insert a spare spark plug. Lay the spark plug on a good ground position on the block. Have a helper attempt to start the engine while you observe the spark plug. If there is a good spark the problem is internal. If there is no spark proceed.

    4

    Check the electrical plug on the radiator side of the ignition control module. Attach the black ground lead from the voltmeter on a good ground on the engine. Turn the ignition on and probe the first two wires in the plug closest to the passenger fender. Battery voltage should be present. If no voltage is present the wiring from the fuse block is defective. If the voltage is present, the crankshaft sensor is next.

    5

    Connect the black voltmeter lead to a good engine ground. Probe the third wire in from the left on the ignition control module plug. This is the ignition control module ground. Turn the key on. The voltmeter should display under 100mv. If more than 100mv is shown, the crank sensor is bad.

    6

    Turn the key off and disconnect the ignition control module electrical plug using a socket. Probe the second wire in from the left. Turn the key on and the voltmeter should display 10 volts. If it does, the ignition control module is bad. If the voltage is not correct the crank sensor is bad.

    7

    Pull the spark plug wires off the plugs and remove all the spark plugs using the spark plug socket and ratchet. Insert the compression gauge in the first cylinder and crank the engine over for five revolutions. Check and record the amount of compression and move on to the next and repeat the procedure and so on. All cylinders should be within 10 percent of each other. If one cylinder is found to be exceedingly low or have no compression, the engine has an internal problem.

Jumat, 15 Maret 2013

How to Tell If My Automobile Has an Original or a Rebuilt Engine

How to Tell If My Automobile Has an Original or a Rebuilt Engine

Automobile engines don't last forever, but a rebuild can easily double or triple its intended lifespan. Cars with rebuilt engines can be a great deal, but they can also be a nightmarish waste of money if the engine has been rebuilt several times before. Every time the pistons go up and down in the bores, they remove a tiny amount of metal from the walls. During the rebuild, a machinist sends a sort of drill bit through the bores to enlarge them all to an even and predictable size. You can perform this boring procedure only a few times before the cylinder walls become too thin to support another rebuild.

Instructions

    1

    Examine the engine for wires and wiring harnesses that aren't in their brackets/looms. Look for broken or missing plastic wire mounts; any of these indicate that someone has been into the engine in that area. If you see loose wiring harnesses and tubes on both sides of the engine, then odds are the engine has been out of the car before.

    2

    Look around the engine at the hose clamps, and look for hose clamps with long tabs hanging off of the worm gears. All manufacturers have a particular type of hose clamp they like to use, and almost none of them use the chrome hardware-store type with holes running all the way down the length of the strip. If you see hose clamps that don't match other hose clamps on the engine or clamps with long tabs hanging off, then odds are that that part has been removed before.

    3

    Examine the mating surface where the valve cover, intake manifold and engine oil pan meet the engine block. Manufacturers typically use black silicone sealant where they use any at all, whereas most mechanics will use either orange or blue high-temp silicone sealant. Small beads of orange or blue sealant around the valve cover or intake manifold don't necessarily mean the engine has been rebuilt, but sealant around the oil pan does. If you see visible sealant around all three, there is a very strong chance that the engine has been rebuilt.

    4

    Check the freeze plugs. If they look shiny and new, have a multicolored hue that indicates the anodized coating is still present or you see white Teflon tape around the plug, then the freeze plugs are probably newer than the block. Additionally, many factory-installed oil gallery plugs (usually found around the center of the engine block under the timing cover) use square-shaped center holes. Aftermarket plugs usually use hexagonal holes. Hex-headed oil gallery plugs and new freeze plugs are a strong indicator of a rebuild, since machinists typically remove them prior to "hot-tanking" the engine block in cleaning solution and replace them with aftermarket units afterward.

    5

    Remove the cylinder head and measure the bore. This is almost the acid test for an engine rebuild; you have to say "almost" because some mechanics will perform a "re-ring" job that involves replacing only the bearings, rings and gaskets. Measure the bore with a set of dial calipers; it should read within 0.002 inch of the factory bore measurement. You'll want to measure the bore at the ridge at the top of the bore, since the area beneath it represents the metal removed by the piston rings. The ridge represents the size of the bore from the factory or from the machine shop. Cylinder overboring usually comes in 0.010 inch increments, so the engine has almost certainly been rebuilt if the ridge measures close to 0.010, 0.020, 0.030, 0.040, 0.050 or 0.060 over the factory specification.

How to Test a 1990 Volvo ECM

The 1990 Volvo "200" and "700" series cars have a reputation for safety and years of dependability. However, the more mileage a car accumulates, the more likely it is components will fail, and the 1990 Volvo series is no exception. The electronic control module (ECM) is the brain of a car. It controls ignition, fuel and electrical systems. Knowing how to test the ECM to make sure things are functioning properly is useful with a car this old.

Instructions

    1

    Release the hood latch lever. It is located on the lower left side of the car underneath the dashboard.

    2

    Open the hood. The diagnostic connector is located on the right side of the engine compartment next to the fluid reservoir

    3

    Open the cover marked "A." Pull the wire free.

    4

    Insert the wire into terminal "2".

    5

    Turn the ignition key to its second position.

    6

    Press the button where it's marked "A." Hold it down for two seconds. The red LED light will flash a three-digit code. Press the button again to view a second code, and continue to press the button until all codes have been displayed.

    7

    Remove the wire from terminal "2" and insert it into terminal "6". Repeat the rest of the steps to view all of the codes.

Subaru Legacy Speedometer Problems

Subaru Legacy Speedometer Problems

Despite being Subaru's longest-running model in the U.S., the Legacy is known to have infrequent speedometer problems. In particular, the 1999 Subaru Legacy has the worst track record of any year. A faulty speedometer results in your car registering an incorrect speed and total mileage.

Subaru Legacy

    Introduced in 1990, the Legacy is Subaru's major nameplate in the United States. Specializing in all-weather sedans and wagons, the Legacy is a favorite for families and outdoor enthusiasts. There have been five generations of Legacy vehicles, with the fifth starting in 2010.

Speedometer

    Although infrequent speedometer problems are reported in various Legacy models, the 1999 model experiences the most complaints. Drivers reported instances where the speedometer either reads the incorrect speed or drops to zero. MSN Auto labels the 1999 Legacy's speedometer malfunctions as a "moderate" problem. 1999 is the only year that the Legacy incurred moderate speedometer problems.

Solution

    According to MSN Auto, the cost to replace a 1999 Subaru Legacy speedometer head is estimated at $133 for parts and $97.50 for labor at 2010 prices. Due to the age of the car, a 1999 Legacy would not be covered under the Subaru factory warranty. If your newer vehicle experiences speedometer problems, it might still be covered under Subaru's 3-year or 36,000-mile basic warranty.

What Does a Service 4 Wheel Drive Light Mean on a 2000 GMC Jimmy?

What Does a Service 4 Wheel Drive Light Mean on a 2000 GMC Jimmy?

The 2000 GMC Jimmy was one of the first generation of GMC Vehicles where four-wheel drive could be engaged through dash-mounted buttons that tied into mode switches and electronic controls rather than the old school, floor-mounted switch. Like older model four-wheel drives, the SUV needed to be idle when gears were shifted from two-wheel to four-wheel drive and it was recommended that four-wheel drive not be engaged while on dry pavement. The system changed somewhat in the early 2000s as GMC redesigned its line of trucks and SUVs.

Warning Light Display

    GM 4WD warning lights normally come on briefly for several seconds when the vehicle is turned on and when moving between 2WD and 4WD. However, they are not lights that signal a time for routine maintenance. If they come on while driving or come on and then began blinking, it can signal a number of potentially serious conditions that need attention.

Failure to Engage

    The light should shine for several seconds when shifting from 2WD to 4WD. If the light only blinks briefly, it is signaling the vehicle did not succeed in shifting gears. This could signal a faulty position sensor in the encoder motor.

Incorrectly Attempting to Shift Into 4WD

    Blinking will occur if you are attempting to shift in a manner that is not allowed, such as trying to shift into 4WD when the vehicle is in motion. To successfully shift gears, the Jimmy must be either stopped or in neutral. .

Software Failure

    Software failures are rather common problems as these vehicles ages. The warning light will appear when the transfer case control module (TCCM) software is failing. This will require replacing the TCCM

Actuator Failure

    The actuator in the front differential may be sticking and need to be replaced. Check all vacuum hoses for leaks. Also check the actuator itself to see it the cable is pulling the axle coupler.

How to Troubleshoot a Prelude Fuel System

How to Troubleshoot a Prelude Fuel System

The Honda Prelude was produced from 1978 through 2001, and thousands of Preludes remain on the roads today. If you are having trouble starting yours up in the morning, you may need to troubleshoot your Prelude's fuel system. This will only take you an hour or two, but it requires some specialized tools. Before taking action, check with your local Honda dealership to find out if any parts of your Prelude's fuel system have been recalled. The 1986 model, for example, had several components that were recalled.

Instructions

    1

    Determine the ambient temperature; in hot weather (80 degrees Fahrenheit or higher), you can pour cool water on the gas line to help your car start properly. If the temperature is 30 degrees or lower, try pouring de-icer into the fuel tank.

    2

    Check the fuel level in the tank with the car parked on a flat surface. If your Prelude is parked on an incline, its fuel injector might be taking in more air than fuel. Try starting the car again once it's on a flat surface.

    3

    Attach an ignition tester to one of the spark plugs and start your car. There should be a spark in the space between the spark plug and the ignition tester. If you do not see a spark, all of the spark plugs will need to be replaced.

    4

    Disconnect the gas line with a gas line disconnect tool, available at most auto parts stores. Drain the gas line into a clear container and start the engine. Gas should pass through the line. If you do not see gas coming through the gas line, take your car to a mechanic. You may need to have your gas pump replaced.

    5

    Remove the gas lines from your Prelude and examine them for cracks or weak spots. If they are damaged in any way, they will need to be replaced.

How to Troubleshoot a 1996 Honda Accord

How to Troubleshoot a 1996 Honda Accord

When you're experiencing engine trouble in your 1996 Honda Accord, you have two options: take your car to a pricey automotive shop or troubleshoot the problem on your own. Troubleshooting isn't as difficult as you think. It's simply a matter of starting with the biggest and most likely engine components and working your way down to the smaller, more complex components. The tools involved aren't expensive and in many cases, such as having the engine codes pulled, you can do it for free. It's a process of elimination.

Instructions

    1

    Check the instrument panel for signs of trouble. Check the readings on the oil pressure gauge, battery gauge and temperature gauge. A deviation from the norm in any of these indicates where the trouble is coming from.

    2

    Identify the trouble pattern in your Honda. If the car is overheating, the problem may be related to the thermostat, water pump or radiator. If it has no power or dies while driving, the problem may have something to do with the battery, alternator or fuel pressure. If it runs well until it reaches a certain speed, the trouble is motion-related and may be due to loose wires, belts, hoses or cables.

    3

    Check the battery and alternator for proper voltage output. Connect a volt meter to the positive and negative battery posts while the engine is off to read the battery's output first. The reading should be between 12.5 and 12.8 volts. Crank the engine and check it again, this time reading the alternators output. The reading should now be between 13.6 and 14.3 volts.

    4

    Pull the fuses to inspect them for breaks or use a fuse tester light for faster results. Ground the tester, turn the key into the "On" position and test each fuse in turn. If the light doesn't come on, the fuse is broken and needs to be replaced.

    5

    Retrieve trouble codes stored in the Honda's computer. Connect a scanner to the Assembly Line Diagnostic Link (ALDI) located under the dash. Turn the key on, follow the prompts on the screen and read the codes. Refer to an owner's or repair manual for the code meanings. Take your Honda to an auto parts store where this check is performed for free if you don't own a scanner.

Rabu, 13 Maret 2013

How to Troubleshoot a Car With a Thumping on the Rear Passenger Side

How to Troubleshoot a Car With a Thumping on the Rear Passenger Side

A thumping sound in an automobile should not be ignored, as the sound is a sign of a problem. Delaying repairs may result in further damage, which could increase the costs of repair and make the car unsafe.

Wheel and Tire Problems

    Wheels can become bent from striking objects, and tires can develop bulges from broken belts or wear. Both problems may cause a thumping noise. Thumping sounds caused by wheel and tire problems will typically increase in frequency at higher speeds, though the sound may not be heard at lower speeds. These problems can often be spotted by visual inspection.

Suspension Problems

    Worn or broken struts or strut mounts can create a thumping noise, especially when the vehicle hits a bump in the roadway. To test struts, bounce the rear of the car by forcefully pushing down on it and letting go. After letting go, the car should settle back to its original position without bouncing or noise.

Loose Trim

    Loose trim pieces near or in the wheel well can flutter in the wind while a car is being driven. These trim pieces may create a thumping noise as they strike other objects. A car owner can check trim pieces for looseness to determine if that is the source of the noise.

G-Force OBDII Scan Tools

G-Force OBDII Scan Tools

A gravitational force (g-force) is the acceleration that an object feels relative to free fall, and free fall happens when gravity is the main force that an object is experiencing. In vehicles, g-forces are found within acceleration and braking systems, and you can measure these g-forces using scanner systems. Most of these scanner tools are designed to communicate with the on-board diagnostic II (OBD-II) system, which is the main computing component of a vehicle. These scanners help you diagnose problems with your vehicle.

Rev

    This is an iPhone and iPod Touch application that provides you with the same features as a standalone OBD-II scanner, and you can plug your phone or iPod Touch directly into your vehicle's engine control unit (ECU). This allows you to view real-time information, which means that you can capture vehicle statistics as your car is running. These statistics include information on acceleration and brake g-forces, fuel pressure, revolutions per minute (RPM) and vehicle speed. Other features of this application include seeing why your Check Engine light cam is on and resetting it, and you can create graphs of data and logs of statistical information. As of 2010, the Rev by DevToaster application costs $39.99, and you can download the app from the author's website.

PLX Kiwi

    The PLX Kiwi Wireless Internet (WiFi) Miles Per Gallon (MPG) Trip Calculator and OBD-II Scanner features a plug and play interface, which means that your vehicle system will recognize the device as soon as you plug it in. It allows you to keep track of mileage during a trip and it outputs diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs), which you can use to diagnose vehicle problems. You can also use this tool to clear DTCs and your Check Engine light. It also comes with a g-force calculator for acceleration, braking and lateral forces, and it has an inclinometer, which shows how your vehicle moves over different terrains. As of 2010, this product costs $149.99, and it is compatible with an iPod Touch and an iPhone.

AutoEnginuity

    The AutoEnginuity Scan Tool is a scan tool for OBD-II and Enhanced OBD (EOBD) IV vehicles, and it is universal serial bus (USB) 2.0 compliant. This tool allows you to measure g-forces, torque, miles per hour (MPH) and horsepower, and you can output vehicle speed information into graphical form. This tool outputs DTC information and can run tests on your system to determine whether or not it is working properly. Other features of this tool include capturing live data as your vehicle is in motion and obtaining data about your different sensors, including oxygen (O2), ignition and timing sensors. As of 2010, this product costs between $250 and $350.