Selasa, 30 April 2013

How to Troubleshoot a 2002 Monte Carlo

How to Troubleshoot a 2002 Monte Carlo

The Monte Carlo has been in and out the Chevrolet product lineup since 1970, finally coming to an end in 2007. Throughout its entire production run the Monte Carlo remained a two-door coupe. Like most modern cars, the Monte Carlo has many mechanical and electrical systems. To troubleshoot the Monte Carlo, eliminate potential causes of the problem you are experiencing with the car.

Instructions

    1

    Look under the 2002 Monte Carlo on a regular basis after the car has cooled down. These regular inspections will reveal any small leaks from the engine, transmission, brake lines or power steering systems.

    2

    Insert the key into Monte Carlo's ignition and turn it to the accessory position. Check the car's electrical systems, including the windshield wipers, fan motor, radio and other systems. If any of them are not working, turn the key back and remove the key from the ignition. Inspect the fuse box located under the dashboard on the driver's side. Remove the fuse and inspect the plastic end, if the metal strip inside the plastic end is broken, then the fuse will need to be replaced.

    3

    Listen to the car when trying to start it. If the car is turning over but not starting, the spark plugs may not be providing a good enough spark to get the Monte Carlo started. Open the engine compartment, disconnect the spark plug cables and remove the spark plugs using a spark plug wrench. Inspect the bottom of the spark plug. Clean the carbon off the spark plug using a wire brush. If the carbon buildup is excessive, then replace the old spark plugs with new ones.

How to Troubleshoot Electric Car Windows

How to Troubleshoot Electric Car Windows

Electric car windows are convenient to use. With just a touch of a button, you can operate your windows with ease. When something goes wrong with electric car windows, it can be frustrating when trying to figure out a solution. Some of the common problems with these types of windows can be identified with a few troubleshooting steps. In little time, you will have the ability to operate your windows without having to spend money on expensive repairs you are able to do yourself.

Instructions

    1

    Check the fuse to see if it is blown if your electric window won't move. Generally, if only one side of your car window has the problem, the fuse is okay. Check the car's manual for directions on how to change the fuse or bring the car to a repair shop.

    2

    Check for a bad window switch. Remove the window switch from the panel of the car door. Insert a small screwdriver with a flat tip under the release tabs for the switches. Turn the car key to the "ON" position and use a voltmeter to test the window switch.

    3

    Lubricate the tracking on your car's window tracking if when you are opening the window it moves slowly. You will need to remove the door panel to lubricate the tracks. Check your car's manual for detailed instructions.

    4

    Use a voltage meter to test for proper voltage for the power window motor plug. If there is insufficient voltage, it will cause the window to move slowly.

How to Troubleshoot a U-Joint

Universal joints compensate for the offset between the transmission and the rear differential, as well as the variable height of the differential as the suspension allows the rear axle to move up and down. The U-joint consists of a yoke on each end of the drive shaft that connects to the yokes on the transmission and the rear differential via the U-joint bearing. Bearing wear because of lack of lubrication or hard use can introduce play into the U-joint and ultimately lead to failure. Bad U-joints display symptoms that can be confused with other drivetrain problems, but can easily be isolated as the problem with a few tests.

Instructions

    1

    Start the engine. Press firmly on the brake pedal and put the transmission in Drive. Listen for a clicking or clunking sound as the transmission engages. Shift to Reverse and listen again. The noise may indicate a bad U-joint bearing. To test in manual transmission vehicles, set the emergency brake and let the clutch out enough to turn the drive shaft slightly without stalling the engine.

    2

    Turn the engine off. Chock the front wheels. Raise the rear of the vehicle using a jack at the approved jacking points. Support the vehicle on jack stands.

    3

    Inspect all of the U-joints for signs of lubrication containment failure. Bad U-joints will have a greasy or caked appearance from road grime trapped by the bearing grease. This indicates the seals are gone on the bearings and that they will fail soon. Replace the bearings.

    4

    Inspect the bearing caps on each side of the yoke and make certain they are tight. Tighten any loose bearing caps with a wrench before proceeding.

    5

    Grab the drive shaft near each U-joint and alternately push and pull on the shaft. There should be no relative motion between the shaft yoke and its mate. Any relative motion or noise while performing this step indicates worn bearings that need replacing.

    6

    Inspect the boot on constant velocity type U-joints for tears or signs of escaping grease. Replace according to manufacturers procedures.

Senin, 29 April 2013

A 2000 Lexus ES300 Code P1130

With a 3.0-liter six-cylinder engine and a four-speed automatic transmission you have power and luxury in a car that didn't cost you 3 million dollars to purchase. Like all vehicles of this era, your lexus has an on-board diagnostics system that is used to help technicians diagnose problems within the engine and powertrain; in most cases before they are even serious enough to notice. Code P1130 specifically relates to your bank 1 sensor 1 air/fuel sensor, also commonly referred to as an oxygen sensor.

What It Does

    Your vehicle uses multiple catalytic converters to purify the noxious gases created from the combustion process so that it doesn't escape into the earths atmosphere. In order for the catalytic converter to work as efficient as possible the engines air to fuel ratio has to be kept within a certain range. The four sensors installed in your exhaust system detects and monitors the amount of oxygen left over in the exhaust after the combustion process and after the exhaust has been filtered through the catalytic converter. The on-board computer then uses information transmitted from the sensor to adjust the engines air to fuel ratio accordingly. The sensor in question for trouble code P1130 is located just below the exhaust manifold for the rear cylinder head.

The Meaning

    Code P1130 means a malfunction has been indicated with the indicated oxygen sensor. This being said; however, is very vague because it could mean a variety of different things have occurred from a failure in the air or fuel system all the way to a faulty sensor. It can be difficult to determine the root cause of code P1130 but there are steps you can take that will help find and repair the cause. You may not notice any drivability or running issues, but if your air to fuel mixture is too rich, or the sensor is relay the incorrect information to the computer you can find yourself falling victim to a failed emissions test, if your state subjects you to them.

Determining the Cause

    You would have to procure a Lexus automotive scanner to perform the pinpoint testing the dealership can perform, but a dirty MAF sensor or open vacuum passage can and has been known to set trouble code P1130 because the computer may receive an incorrect air reading. The MAF sensor is located in the air intake tubing and has a square top on it. Remove the MAF sensor and clean it with MAF sensor cleaner. Also inspect the air tubing and throttle body for any blockages, and repair any damaged vacuum lines. Clear your trouble codes with a common OBD-II scanner and drive the vehicle. If the trouble code is provided again, support the vehicle with jack stands and inspect the harness wiring leading from the engine harness to the oxygen sensor and make any repairs as necessary. A break in any of the oxygen sensor wiring will trigger a check engine light. If a repair was made, test drive the vehicle and check for trouble codes. Chances are if you are still having code P1130 the oxygen sensor is bad and needs replaced.

Replacing the Oxygen Sensor

    To replace the oxygen sensor you will need an oxygen sensor socket, ratchet and copper anti-seize. Don't attempt removal while the exhaust or engine is hot or you can be injured and damage could occur to the exhaust piping. Disconnect the sensor harness and rotate the sensor counterclockwise with the oxygen sensor socket and ratchet. Clean the threads of the pipe with a wire brush and apply fresh copper anti-seize to the threads of the new sensor. The sensor installs with a clockwise rotation and should be tightened to 27 foot-pounds. Connect the sensor and clear any trouble codes. If the sensor is hard to remove you can heat the area around the oxygen sensor with a propane torch to assist in removal.

Minggu, 28 April 2013

Saab 9.3 Troubleshooting

Troubleshooting problems with your Saab 9.3 can be a very frustrating and time-consuming process if you do not know what areas to look at first. Auto manufacturers today now equip their cars with an onboard diagnostic computer that allows both drivers and mechanics to scan the diagnostic system for error codes. There are error codes given out for each unique component of your car which has a sensor that is connected to the diagnostic computer. You can scan for these error codes to find out which parts are failing, saving you time in the troubleshooting process.

Instructions

    1

    Find the location of your 9.3's onboard diagnostic port. Check the owner's manual if you cannot locate it on your own. Typically, the diagnostic ports are located underneath the steering wheel somewhere in the driver's side foot well. The specific location can vary depending on what year and generation that your 9.3 is.

    2

    Put your key into your Saab's ignition and turn it to the "II" or "III" position, which will respectively either turn on the electronics system, or activate the electronics and turn on the engine. When troubleshooting some problems, your engine may not be able to run, so it is sufficient to turn it to the second position only.

    3

    Insert the code reader's plug into the diagnostic port while your car's electronics are turned on. Allow the code reader to scan for error codes that are present in the diagnostic system.

    4

    Watch the display of the code reader as it scans for error codes. Write down a list of error codes that appear on the display.

    5

    Contact your local Saab dealer, auto parts store, or local Saab mechanic and explain that you are having trouble decoding error codes on your Saab. Each of these three resources will be able to provide you with the specific parts that are associated with each error code, allowing you to determine which parts need to be replaced.

How to Troubleshoot the Climate Control on a 2002 Jeep Liberty

How to Troubleshoot the Climate Control on a 2002 Jeep Liberty

Chrysler's 2002 Jeep Liberty utility vehicle includes multiple zones for its heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Air can be blown to the panel, floor and windscreen, or to a combination of zones. Multiple blower positions can vary fan throughput allowing for a range of heat and comfort levels. Problems with the climate control can include the Liberty's cabin becoming too hot, too cold or stale. These kinds of problems can be corrected by following some troubleshooting.

Instructions

    1

    Turn the blower fan knob all the way to the right if the Jeep is too hot when you get into it. Then turn the mode selector to the "Panel" position and open the windows for a few minutes. When the Jeep has cooled down, turn the mode selector to the "A/C Recirculation" stop.

    2

    Turn the mode selector to the "A/C Recirculation" position if the Jeep is too humid. You may have to leave the mode selector in this position in humid climates. If you're in a more arid climate, you can use regular air conditioning, which can also reduce mustiness.

    3

    Unblock air vents if parts of the car are too hot or cold. The system is dependent on air traveling through the passenger compartment. Anything blocking the dash registers, like cell phone holders, for example, will affect performance. Remove toys, coats or shopping bags from the foot wells where ducts are located.

    4

    Clear any leaves or snow from the Jeep's main input grille found below the windscreen. This is a crucial part of the climate control system because it's where the fresh air that's heated and cooled enters your Jeep. Clearing debris in this area will result in marked improvement to the system's performance.

Sabtu, 27 April 2013

What Are the Causes of Leaky Wheel Cylinders?

If brakes leak fluid, the results can be deadly. For this reason, it is imperative that brakes be 100 percent leak free and functioning at all times. Wheel cylinders, found inside drum brakes, are very precise devices made with tightly fitting parts designed to hold fluid. When you press on the brake pedal, it sends fluid down to the wheel cylinders, pushing internal pistons out which activates the brakes. When a wheel cylinder leaks, something is definitely wrong. Understanding the potential causes of leaky wheel cylinders is the first step in correcting a potentially dangerous situation.

Internal Corrosion

    Internal corrosion is the chief culprit of leaky wheel cylinders. Brake fluid, by nature, is hygroscopic--meaning that it absorbs water. If the fluid is not changed for several years, the moisture in the fluid rises to considerable levels. The moisture, in turn, contributes to internal rusting, which eats away at the cylinder bore, leaving holes. These holes allow fluid to leak past the pistons and out to the environment.

Shoddy Workmanship

    When brakes are bled after work is done, the bleeder nipples must be closed all the way and tightened down securely according to the manufacturer's recommended torque setting. Bleeding is a process of removing all air from the system. If the person bleeding the brakes did not put the correct torque setting on the bleeder nipples, they will vibrate loose over time. When this happens, fluid leaks out from the bleeder area. Suspect loosened bleeder nipples if you had the wheel cylinders replaced but within the year the same wheel cylinder starts to leak again.

Worn Piston Seals

    Piston seals will eventually wear out due to age. The seals are made out of a compound of rubber, and over time, they become brittle. When this happens, they can crack and allow fluid to leak past the pistons.

How to Troubleshoot Fuel Gauge Problems

How to Troubleshoot Fuel Gauge Problems

What a downer it is when you don't make it to the gas station in time and you get stuck on the road. Imagine that you get stuck on the road and your fuel gauge shows that you have half a tank of fuel left when really it's really empty. If you have a malfunctioning fuel gauge, then you never know how much fuel you really have left. You can troubleshoot your fuel gauge issues on your own with a bit of mechanical ability.

Instructions

    1

    Start your vehicle. Tap your finger on the fuel gauge. Sometimes the gauge will stick and a tap will release it. If the gauge moves when you tap it, then the issue is with the gauge.

    2

    Locate the two wires that attach to the rear of the fuel gauge and make sure they are connected well. Wiggle the wires and see if the gauge moves.

    3

    Turn the ignition key off and find the fuse box for the vehicle. Pull out the owner's manual to help you find the fuse box and the correct fuse that controls the fuel gauge. Pull the fuse that controls the fuel gauge out and examine it. If it is burnt, then you will see the little wire inside is not solid. There are extra replacement fuses usually located on the fuse cover.

    4

    Ask your friend to sit in the vehicle and turn the ignition key to the first position. Go to the fuel tank area of the car and find the two wires attached to the fuel level sending unit. The fuel level sending unit is usually inside the fuel tank but the wires are normally accessible. Wiggle these wires while your friend looks at the fuel gauge. Have him tell you if the gauge moves. If the gauge does not move then remove both wires and touch them together. Ask your friend if the gauge moves when you rub the wires together. If the gauge moves, then the issue is with the fuel level sensor. If the gauge does not move, then you will need to replace the fuel gauge.

My 2007 Saturn Won't Start

My 2007 Saturn Won't Start

Saturn was formerly a General Motors brand. It was discontinued as of 2009. If you are having trouble getting your Saturn to start, there a few easy steps that could have you back up and running in no time.

Check the Battery

    If your 2007 Saturn won't start, it could be due to a drained battery. Any number of things from a dysfunctional alternator to leaving the lights on overnight can deplete a car's battery. You can test this by connecting the battery to a voltmeter. If you don't have access to a voltmeter, try jump-starting the battery with another car and a set of jumper cables.

Check the Fuel

    If the battery is working properly, ensure that the car has a sufficient amount of fuel in the tank. If the electronic gauges in the car are still working, check the fuel gauge. If the electronics aren't working, get a gas can and add a gallon to the tank, then try starting the car.

Call a Mechanic

    If the battery is working normally and there is gas in the tank, it may be time to call a mechanic. You may have to make arrangements to have the car towed into the shop or hire a mechanic willing to assess the problem on-site.

Jumat, 26 April 2013

The Mercedes W124's Fuse Box Location

The Mercedes W124's Fuse Box Location

The fuse box of your Mercedes Benz W124 holds important fuses for the electrical components of your vehicle. There are times when you need to go into the fuse box to change a blown fuse so the electrical currents can run properly. Once you locate the fuse box, you need to remove the plastic lid that protects the fuses inside. Once you've done that, you will be able to locate the proper fuse, pull it out with your fingers or a needle-nose pliers, and replace it with a new one.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood of your Mercedes Benz W124 and stand in front of the bumper.

    2

    Look in the upper right corner of the engine compartment. Locate the small sealed plastic box near the firewall and brake fluid reservoir.

    3

    Grab the lid of the plastic box and pull it. The clasps that hold it in place should release when you pull the lid off.

Kamis, 25 April 2013

Troubleshooting Turn Signal Problems on a 1985 Ford F150

Troubleshooting Turn Signal Problems on a 1985 Ford F150

The 1985 Ford F150 followed a similar setup to all Ford trucks and SUVs with regard to the turn signal. The signal routes through the ignition switch to the turn signal relay. The relay interrupts the signal before going to the light, allowing the light to flash on and off. Problems with any aspect of the system will cause the lights to not activate, or remain lit without flashing off. Determining the cause takes about 10 minutes.

Instructions

    1

    Start the vehicle and activate the hazard lights. The hazard relay is separate from that of the turn signal. If all lights flash properly, the problem is with the turn signal relay or the switch. Activate the turn signals for the driver's and passenger's sides, and monitor the activity of the lights.

    2

    Replace the bulb if the same-side light on the opposite end of the vehicle flashes wildly while the corresponding light does nothing. You might have two burned out bulbs on one side, so check both.

    3

    Replace the fuse if nothing happens at all with the turn signals but the hazard lights operated properly. The fuse panel is located beneath the dash at the access panel to the left of the steering column. Check the fuses for both the flashers and the turn signals. A diagram is printed on the cover to the fuse panel showing the locations of both. Needle-nose pliers make pulling the fuse easy.

    4

    Replace the turn signal relay if the flashers worked but none of the turn signals activated, or all of the lights activated without turning off. The relay is on top of the fuse panel. It is a cylindrical plug in the lower corner of the fuse panel. It pulls straight out.

    5

    Trace the wiring to the light fixtures. The majority of the wiring is hidden, so look at the connections to the bulbs. The chance of a problem with the wiring is very slim. Replace the plugs if there are major signs of rust or corrosion, and you are familiar with the process of splicing wires. Otherwise, you should have a professional replace the damaged wires.

    6

    Take the vehicle to a professional to have the switch replaced if the fuse, bulbs, connections and relay are all operating properly.

Rabu, 24 April 2013

Suzuki Forenza Headlights Won't Work

If the headlights on your Suzuki Forenza don't work, one of four major components of the headlight system may have failed: the headlight bulbs, the wiring harness bringing power to the headlight bulbs, the fuses that protect the electrical system from surges or the headlight switch that allows the driver to turn On or Off the low and high beam headlights. Any of these components may be the cause for the failure of your headlights to turn on. Fortunately, the diagnostic procedure is simple and straightforward.

Instructions

    1

    Replace the headlight bulb on the Suzuki Forenza in the headlight assembly that does not turn on. Turn off the Forenza and prop open the hood. Disconnect the wiring harness from the rear, twist the weather cap off, take out the bulb and replace with the new one. Replace the cap and wiring harness and turn the Forenza back on to check that the headlight bulb works. Continue to the next step if it does not.

    2

    Check that the fuses for the left and right headlights are not blown out. Turn the vehicle off, open the Forenza's hood, and locate the black, plastic box on the right side of the engine compartment that houses the fuses. Check the fuses for both the low and high beams. If any are blown out, replace them and turn the headlights on to verify that that was the problem.

    3

    Connect the positive lead from the voltmeter to the positive terminal on the battery. Connect the negative lead from the voltmeter to the power lead on the wiring harness that feeds power to the headlight that is not turning on. Verify that power is coming through the wiring harness. Replace the harness if the voltmeter detects no power. If it does, continue to the next step.

    4

    Check the headlight switch if none of the headlights are turning on. Disconnect the negative battery cable in the engine compartment. Remove the steering column bezel and disconnect the wiring block from the back of the headlight switch. Inspect that the leads of the wiring harness are clean. If so, replace the headlight switch by removing the three screws mounting it to the steering wheel and installing the replacement part.

Why Does My Car Vibrate When I Am Stopped?

Why Does My Car Vibrate When I Am Stopped?

In years past, owners simply dealt with mild engine vibrations. In some cases -- particularly in classic muscle cars -- drivers even saw mild vibrations when stopped as a sign of engine power. Automakers take extreme measures in modern vehicles to eliminate all vibration. Mechanical failures, however, can negate all of the vibration-eliminating measures and result in a vibration when stopped.

Vehicle Misfire

    Internal combustion engines require a delicate balance of fuel, air and spark to operate correctly. When any of the three elements of internal combustion lack in purity or consistency, a misfire may occur. A severe enough misfire may cause the engine to vibrate, especially at idle. This engine vibration, if severe enough, may result in the entire vehicle vibrating at idle.

Low Engine Idle

    Every vehicle has a specific idle range to prevent vibration and stalling. In modern vehicles, an on board computer regulates the vehicles idle. If the idle drops below its specified range, you may experience a vibration at when stopped, especially when stopped with the vehicle in gear -- if equipped with an automatic transmission.

Broken or Weak Engine or Transmission Mounts

    Every engine has engine and transmission mounts -- the number and locations vary, depending on the vehicle. The mounts are metal frames with rubber inserts inside the frames. Metal brackets on the engine or transmission connect the engine or transmission to the engine or transmission mounts.

    If the rubber insert becomes weak or breaks, it allows the engine to move more that it's intended to. This may result in a vibration when you stop the vehicle -- especially when fitted with an automatic transmission and stopped in gear.

Engine Failure

    If the engine comes out of balance from internal component failure, such as: main bearing failure, connecting rod failure, crankshaft failure or balance shaft failure, this balance may be adversely affected. This can result in a severe vibration at idle, but you may also experience vibration throughout the engine's rpm range and hear loud noises from the engine.

Vacuum Loss

    All modern vehicles use a vacuum created by internal combustion, to drive engine controls. If a vacuum leak develops, these engine controls may not have enough vacuum to function correctly. This can result in a mild to severe vibration at idle, and may sometimes result in poor acceleration.

How to Test a Tractor Light

Almost all tractors come equipped with headlights, tail lights, brake lights and side marker lights. Just because the lights stop working does not necessarily mean that the bulb is burned out. There could be a faulty ground wire, broken ground wire, faulty light plug or a faulty light switch. The key to diagnosing a tractor light that does not work is to apply proper basic troubleshooting steps. Always start with the obvious components.

Instructions

    1

    Park the tractor on a flat surface and turn the engine off with the transmission in gear.

    2

    Visibly inspect the inside of the light to ensure that the light bulb element is still intact. The light bulb element inside of the light is the two prongs that are secured by one wire. If the light bulb is blown, the one secure wire will be broken and separated away from the two prongs. If you can't see the bulb inside of the light, remove the light source from the tractor

    3

    Remove the tractor light from the tractor with a ratchet and socket if needed to remove any mounting bolts. Remove the bulb from the light source and inspect the bulb to see if it is blown. If the bulb is blown, replace it with the proper size bulb. Test the wiring harness plug that connects to the light source plug next to ensure that power is getting to the light source.

    4

    Turn the tractor's ignition key to the accessory position. Turn the light switch to the "On" position. Locate a clean bolt or metal surface on the side of the tractor to use as a ground source. Hook the black ground lead clamp on the test light to the grounding location on the tractor. Test the wiring harness plug that hooks to the light plug first.

    5

    Slide the tip of the test light into one of the prongs inside the wiring harness plug. If the light inside the test light does not light up, move the tip of the test light to the other prong inside the wiring harness plug. If the light inside of the test light lights up, this will show that the proper amount of power is making it to the light bulb, which will then determine that the light bulb is bad. Replace the bulb. If the light does not light up inside of the test light, check the ground wires attached to the light source.

    6

    Locate any ground wire that is attached to the light source. The ground wire will usually be colored black or white and it will be attached to a metal surface on the tractor. The ground wire will generally be secured to the metal surface by a small bolt, nut or screw. Before removing the ground wire, inspect the grounding surface for any corrosion or rust. Corrosion or rust can prevent the ground wire from making proper contact and prevent the light from working.

    7

    Loosen and remove the bolt or nut that is securing the ground wire to the metal surface. Inspect the ends of the ground wire for any damage, corrosion or rust. Use a wire brush to clean away any rust or corrosion from the metal surface and the ground wire. The ground wire has to have a clean metal surface to be able to make the proper ground for the light source. If the ground wire is damaged, replace the ground wire with a new wire.

How to Repair Faulty Turn Signals on a 2005 Chevy Truck

How to Repair Faulty Turn Signals on a 2005 Chevy Truck

There a few possible reasons for a faulty turn signal in your 2005 Chevrolet truck. The wiring connections might be loose, the fuse might have broken, or the bulb might have simply burned out. Regardless of the problem, there's a simple way to resolve the issue on any 2005 Chevy truck.

Instructions

    1

    Park the truck and open the hood. Remove the keys from the ignition.

    2

    Remove the two pins on top of the headlamp assembly. Pull the headlamp assembly out. Make sure the electrical connector is securely plugged into the rear of the headlamp assembly. Push the turn signal bulb into place, making sure it is not loose.

    3

    Press the turn signal retainer clip to release the turn signal housing. Press the locking release lever on the housing to release the bulb. Remove the old bulb and install a new one. Chevrolet trucks use 3157 bulbs for the turn signal lights.

    4

    Reinstall the tail light housing and replace the headlamp assembly back into the vehicle. Push down on the two pins to secure the headlight.

    5

    Open the fuse box located under the hood on the driver's side. Check the fuse marked "LT TRLR" for the left turn signal and "RT TRLR" for the right turn signal. If either is broken, it should be replaced. A fuse is broken if the metal bar inside is broken. Use a fuse puller to remove the fuse and install a new one.

Selasa, 23 April 2013

Problems With the Cruise Control Drive in a 2005 Toyota Tacoma

Problems With the Cruise Control Drive in a 2005 Toyota Tacoma

The 2005 Toyota Tacoma has had a recall and technical service bulletins (TSB) published on the truck for problems with the cruise control drive. The cruise control drive locks the speed of the Tacoma into place so the operator does not have to press the gas pedal while driving. Once the cruise control drive fails or has problems, the operator must use the gas pedal to maintain speed.

Speed Control Problem

    There were 3.8 million Toyota vehicles recalled because of speed control problems, including the 2005 Toyota Tacoma. According to Toyota, the speed control problem is due to a design defect in the floor mats, making the gas pedal stick in the open position; however, other reports from Toyota state that the gas pedal sticks because of a wiring problem with the cruise control. The gas pedal can jump into the open position, and the driver will not be able to stop the truck. The dealership will replace the floor mats as well as install a newly designed gas pedal and inspect the cruise control wiring harness to resolve the problem.

Range Sensor Problem

    A TSB was issued on the 2005 Toyota Tacoma concerning a problem with the transmission range sensor. This sensor can cause the Tacoma to hesitate while using the cruise control under normal driving conditions. This cruise control drive wiring problem can cause the transmission range sensor to fail, but no direct correlation has been made between the two components. The dealership, however, will replace the transmission range sensor as well as inspect and replace the cruise control wiring harness to correct this problem in the 2005 Toyota Tacoma.

Cruise Control Drive Wiring Problems

    Toyota has published a TSB on the 2005 Tacoma about problems with the wiring connection for the cruise control drive. The connectors can become corroded and not work properly due to a contact problem. Dust and debris can build up in the cruise control drive wiring connections, causing the failure of the cruise control drive to engage. The contact points of the connectors on the cruise control drive wiring harness will not allow electrical signals to be sent to and from the cruise control drive switches. The wiring harness needs to be replaced or spliced properly to fix this cruise control drive problem.

How to Reset a Super Chips Programmer

How to Reset a Super Chips Programmer

The Super MicroTuner programmer allows to download new information to your car computer or store the original stock computer program of your vehicle. The adjustable parameters, such as fuel ratio, injector flow rates, spark timing and automatic transmission acceleration can be selectively modified during the tuning process. If you have used the programmer with the program from another car manufacturer, the Superchips MicroTuner programmer must be reset to return your computer back to the stock condition.

Instructions

    1

    Connect the Superchips MicroTuner programmer to the diagnostic port located under the dash panel of your car. Verify that the ignition switch is turned off.

    2

    Press the ">" key on the keypad after the "Begin with Ign. Off" message appears on the screen.

    3

    Press the "Yes" key after the programmer displays the "Return to Stock? Yes or No" message.

    4

    Turn off the ignition switch and press the ">" key on the keypad after the "Turn Ignition Off" message prompt to start the initialization of the programmer memory.

    5

    Turn on the ignition switch after the "Turn Ignition On Do Not Start Eng." message appears.

    6

    Press the ">" key after the "Ready to Return to Stock" and "Do Not Turn Off

    the Ignition!!!" messages to reset the Superchips MicroTuner programmer to the preloaded stock program.

    7

    Turn off the ignition switch and disconnect the Superchips MicroTuner programmer from the diagnostic port.

Senin, 22 April 2013

Problems With a Torsion Bar

Problems With a Torsion Bar

There are three basic types of spring suspensions: coil spring, leaf spring and torsion spring. Torsion spring suspensions (not to be confused with torsion beam axles) are a vast departure in design from coils and leafs, and utilize an hexagonal or octagonal bar connected to the chassis on one end and the vehicle's lower control arm on the other. When the wheel moves, the torsion bar twists along its center axis instead of bending like a coil or leaf. This compact design offers easy ride height adjustability and replacement, but also creates a number of unique problems.

Progressivity

    Many coil and leaf springs are progressive in nature, meaning that they get stiffer as they compress. Progressivity allows the spring to absorb small bumps and road irregularities for ride comfort on level ground, but are still capable of effectively controlling body roll during cornering. Not all torsion bars are completely linear, but even torsion bars designed for some amount of progressivity don't offer nearly the range of spring rate change as a coil of leaf spring suspension. This is the primary reason that torsion bars aren't as common as other types.

Control Arm Stress

    Cranking the suspension to raise the vehicle can put excess stress on the lower control arm and control arm bushings. Lowering the vehicle excessively can hurt the upper control arm, but this is fairly rare since the tire will typically bottom out in the wheel well before any damage occurs.

Camber Changes

    Camber is the tire's inward or outward tilt from the vertical axis. An slight inward tilt (referred to as negative camber) can help to improve cornering stability and increase handling limits, but will reduce stability under braking and drastically increase wear on the inside edge of the tire. Outward lean (positive camber) will destroy both your handling and braking and increase outer edge tire wear. A torsion bar suspension linearly gains negative camber (inward tilt) when lowered and positive camber when raised.

Spring Pre-Load

    Cranking the torsion bar suspension to raise the vehicle will put a pre-load on the spring, meaning that the torsion spring will twist a couple of degrees for every inch of change in ride height. The torsion spring will only twist but so far until it reaches its limits, so every degree of pre-load twist represents some loss of upward suspension travel. Additionally, even non-progressive torsion springs will get slightly stiffer near their limits when under pre-load; raising your truck 5 inches by simply cranking the torsion bars will almost inevitably result in a rock-hard ride with very little suspension compliance or off-road prowess.

Troubleshooting the Fan Controls on a 2002 Nissan Pathfinder

Troubleshooting the Fan Controls on a 2002 Nissan Pathfinder

Nissan's 2002 Pathfinder sports utility vehicle uses air flow to heat and cool the passenger compartment. Air is drawn into the vehicle through vents, the air is heated or cooled, and then it is blown out of registers in the dash and vents in the foot wells. The air is distributed by a fan, sometimes called a blower, which is operated by a control on the dash. On some models there's a rear fan control that's adjustable by rear seat passengers. Problems with the fan controls can be corrected by troubleshooting.

Instructions

    1

    Turn the fan control to a position other than "0" if the fan control doesn't appear to work. The fan control is the left-most heater-related dial on Pathfinder dashboard. You'll see a fan icon and settings available from 0 to 4.

    2

    Open the air flow registers on the dashboard by moving the ventilator slide or assembly so that the slats are horizontal or vertical and open if the fan control doesn't blow air out at face level. Remove anything blocking the foot well vents.

    3

    Set the mode control to a position that enables air throughput if air still isn't being blown. Identify the icons on the control and choose a setting where an arrow icon points at a part of the body icon. For example, the icon where the arrow points at the face will allow air to be blown through the dash registers.

    4

    Clear blockages from the wiper blade area of the Nissan Pathfinder windshield if the fan control indicates the fan is operating, by making a noise, yet there's no air being passed through. Snow and leaves can block the air input vents.

Minggu, 21 April 2013

Ford Explorer Engine Starting Problems

Ford Explorer Engine Starting Problems

Ford Explorers sometimes have trouble starting, although the vehicles are not particularly prone to such an issue. A number of problems could be to blame if the Explorer will not start These problems are generally classed into three areas.

The Battery


    Battery problems can easily render an Explorer inoperable. The battery might lack a sufficient charge. The positive and negative cables might not be working, or might not be correctly attached. The battery's terminals might not be functional due to corrosion.

Fuel System

    The Explorer's tank might be empty. Due to systemic problems, fuel might not be reaching the injectors. Components within the ignition system might be wet or damaged. The fuel filter might also be clogged. Water might be present in the gas tank.

Wiring

    The Explorer's electrical system plays a role in starting the vehicle. Check fuses, and replace any that are burnt out. Wiring around the battery and the starter motor might be wet or otherwise damaged. Some of the wiring might be loose or disconnected.

Other Mechanical Issues

    Problems with the pinion and the starter motor are sometimes the cause of Explorer starting problems. Look at the timing chain; this is a frequent repair. Explorers with an automatic transmission will not start unless "park" is fully engaged.

How to Get to the Fuel Pump on a 2003 Dakota SUV

The Dodge Motor Company was started by two brothers who had previously been early shareholders and engine builders in the Ford Motor Company. They produced their first car in 1914. By 1920, the company had become the second-largest car company in the Untied States by sales. The 2003 lineup for the company included the Dodge Dakota, a truck that was offered with both a six- and eight-cylinder engine. The 2003 Dakota was equipped with a fuel pump that sits inside the truck's fuel tank and occasionally needs to be replaced.

Instructions

    1

    Park the truck in park on a solid and flat surface. Engage the parking brake and put wheel blocks behind the front two tires of the vehicle. If the truck has a manual transmission, put it into first gear.

    2

    Siphon out all of the fuel from the Dakota's tank into a gas can. Turn the truck's engine on to burn off any residual fuel in the gas tank or fuel lines.

    3

    Detach the battery cables from the battery by using a wrench and needle-nose pliers. Remove the black negative cable first. Pull out the fuel-pump fuse from the truck's fuse box, which is located below and to the left of the truck's steering wheel.

    4

    Raise the rear end of the truck with two jacks. One jack should lift up the frame of the truck near each rear tire. The truck should be sufficiently lifted so that you can easily access the gas tank on the vehicle.

    5

    Set a wooden block or similar object directly below the center of the fuel tank to rest the tank on when you detach it from the truck's body. The wood block should be at least a few inches tall. Resting the tank on the fuel block helps avoid damaging or stretching the fuel lines that run from the tank to the truck's engine. Loosen the two metal straps that hold the truck's fuel tank to the body of the vehicle with a socket wrench. Set the strap bolts and straps nearby and slowly lower the fuel tank onto the wooden block beneath.

    6

    Pull the fuel tank from beneath the Dakota. The fuel pump sits inside the gas tank with the top sticking out. You can now remove the pump and insert a new one, inspect the hose connections or inspect the locking ring holding the pump in place.

Jumat, 19 April 2013

Why Would You Get Gas in Your Oil Pan on an AMC Jeep Eagle?

Why Would You Get Gas in Your Oil Pan on an AMC Jeep Eagle?

The American Motor Company's Eagle may well be the first crossover vehicle domestically produced in viable volumes. Although the term "crossover" had yet to be bandied about, the Eagle had landed. High ground clearance and full-time four-wheel drive were not features found on other domestic sedans or wagons at the time of the Eagle's production run. Discovery of fuel or combustion gases in the crankcase may seem a fatal symptom for this groundbreaking car, but some causes need only simple repairs or maintenance procedures. Extensive repairs may be worth the time and trouble to an enthusiast of this make and model.

Problem Pump

    Like most carbureted cars, the Eagle is equipped with a mechanical fuel pump. The pump lever extends into the engine block, where moving parts depress the lever repeatedly. The seal between the pump body and lever can fail, and gasoline is injected into the engine block with every stroke of the pump lever. In many instances, no outward sign of this failure is visible. However, the level displayed on the engine oil dipstick soon rises beyond the maximum full mark, even though no oil was added to the engine. The contaminated oil on the dipstick will be diluted and smell of gasoline. Test the pump for proper pressure and volume to confirm the failure.

Positive Ventilation

    Combustion gases and fuel vapors can also contaminate the engine oil. While the oil level remains stable, the composition of the oil does not. The contaminated oil takes on the odor of old gasoline and loses its lubricating qualities. Normally, these crankcase fumes are directed into the combustion chamber to be consumed along with the air and fuel mixture. This action is called positive crankcase ventilation, or PCV for short. A check valve, or PCV valve, is inserted into a rubber grommet in the engine valve cover. A hose connects the valve to an engine vacuum port at the base of the carburetor or intake manifold. The engine vacuum pulls combustion fumes through the valve and into the combustion chamber. This system must be in full working order to avoid engine oil contamination and excess exhaust emissions.

Head Gasket

    The gasket that seals the engine block to the cylinder head can suffer a partial failure. Raw fuel or combustion gases from one or more cylinders can cross the defective portion of the gasket and enter the crankcase. Such head gasket deficiencies can also affect engine idle quality and overall performance. A hard miss at idle may indicate a partial gasket failure. Inspect the spark plugs for signs of lost compression and incomplete combustion. Check for a spark plug that appears wet on the business end. A compression test on the cylinders with wet plugs might confirm head gasket failure at those cylinders.

Rings and Dings

    Another way liquid fuel can make way into the oil pan is by slipping past the piston rings. Scored cylinder walls or worn rings can allow fuel to travel below the pistons. Engine compression is greatly reduced, and the diluted oil may even be forced into the combustion chamber. Smoky exhaust emissions and pathetic engine performance are obvious by the time these conditions exist. Reduced compression on all cylinders might permit the engine to crank easily, but fuel and oil consumption is prohibitive to safe operation. Any Eagle displaying these symptoms should be grounded until repairs are made.

What Do You Do if You Think You Have Bad Gasoline in Your Tank?

What Do You Do if You Think You Have Bad Gasoline in Your Tank?

Bad fuel can wreak havoc on a cars engine, and the effects can range from a slight power loss to extensive engine damage. Remedying the effects of bad gas can involve an equally diverse array of actions, with costs that range from pocket change to thousands of dollars.

Treat the Gas

    Before treating a car for the effects of bad gas, drivers must first either remove or restore the gasoline itself. Depending on the condition of the fuel, vehicle owners may be able to resolve the issue with additive products like octane booster and fuel stabilizer. In cases where water may have contaminated the fuel, special water remover products can help restore the vehicles power and performance. Many automotive and discount stores carry these products, and prices may range from about $1 to more than $20 at the time of publication. More severe gasoline issues may require draining the fuel tank, and many drivers may need to visit a professional repair shop for this work.

Mechanical Repairs

    Bad gas can damage some components of a vehicles fuel system and even the engine, so drivers who still experience problems after treating the fuel itself may require more extensive repairs. Depending on the condition of the gas, mechanics may need to repair or replace fuel lines, fuel filters, fuel injectors or carburetors to restore the vehicle to full functionality. AOL Autos cautions that, depending on the extent of the damage, some vehicles may fail to start, frequently stall or run very poorly without these repairs.

Notify the Gas Station

    Drivers who suspect they have recently purchased bad gas should notify the gas station owner or manager as soon as possible. Employees may test the fuel and stop further sales that could inconvenience other drivers, and some station managers may offer to pay for necessary repairs. But Dave Lieber, a columnist for the "Fort Worth (Texas) Star-Telegram," cautions that drivers should not expect gas station managers to offer compensation for inconveniences or repairs. According to Lieber, the effects of bad gas can be difficult for drivers to prove, and the cost of seeking compensation through the legal system often exceeds the cost of the repairs.

Considerations

    Gas can go bad for a number of reasons. Because refining oil into automotive fuel involves an extensive process with numerous chemical additions, volatile gasoline can evaporate, oxidize or become stale over time. Gas must burn almost instantly in the engines combustion chamber, so water and other contaminates introduced into the fuel either through the filling stations pumps or added directly to the gas tank can cause the gas to go bad. Lieber recommends that drivers who cannot remedy the effects of bad gas with a fuel system additive should seek advice from at least two mechanics before paying for professional repairs.

Kamis, 18 April 2013

How do I Retrieve OBD Codes on a 2002 BMW 740Li?

A 2002 BMW 740Li sold in the United States uses OBD-II diagnostic codes, as vehicles sold after 1996 must be OBD-II compliant. You need a diagnostic scan tool to retrieve codes from your BMW. Most automotive store carry them, as do many discount retailers. Some parts stores and garages will let you use a scanner for free, while others charge a small fee.

Instructions

    1

    Open the BMW's driver-side door.

    2

    Look into the leg space under the steering wheel for an outlet with 16 pin receptors. This is the diagnostic port.

    3

    Plug the scan tool's cable into the diagnostic port and turn the tool on.

    4

    Place the keys in the ignition and start the car.

    5

    Wait a few seconds while the tool connects to the diagnostic system. You should now have access to the codes. They will appear on your screen, and depending on the brand of scanner, you can scroll through them and even export them to a laptop with a USB cable (See Tips).

The 1998 Dodge Neon Won't Start

The 1998 Dodge Neon Won't Start

Troubleshooting the reasons why your 1998 Dodge Neon won't start is a fairly simple process when you understand the basic needs and mechanics of a gasoline engine. To start and run, an internal combustion engine like the one in your car needs the same three things required by fire: spark, fuel and air. When an engine is not getting one of these three things, it simply will not start.

Instructions

    1
    Is your engine getting enough electrical power?
    Is your engine getting enough electrical power?

    Check for the presence of electrical power by turning on your headlights and walking to the front of the car. If your car has electrical power, the headlights should be shining brightly. If the headlights are dim or not lit at all, your cars battery may be low or completely discharged.

    While your car may have enough power left in the battery to run the lights, if the motor is slow to turn, it is a good sign that you simply don't have a strong enough electrical supply to crank the engine. In this scenario, you can likely get your car started by using jumper cables and another vehicle or replacing the battery.

    If the car refuses to crank at all, it could be a sign that your battery is completely dead, your starter is locked, the battery terminals are too dirty or loose to allow the passage of electricity or some other electrical issue is causing the problem.

    2
    Is your gas tank empty?
    Is your gas tank empty?

    Turn the key in the ignition to the ON position and listen for a hum as the fuel pump engages and starts to deliver fuel to the engine. If you hear this hum and your car isn't starting, even though the engine is cranking, check your fuel gauge. If your car starts, then sputters and dies, it can mean that you are extremely low on fuel or that your fuel pump is not sending the gas to the engine.

    3

    Check for air obstruction problems by opening the hood of your car and removing the air breather intake assembly cover. Pull out the air filter and set it aside. Try to start the car again and if it starts, you have found your problem. Visually inspect the air filter for large amounts of debris, dust or oil. If it appears to be dirty, gently tap it on a hard surface to knock some of the debris out of it or replace it with a new air filter.

    4

    Try to start the car again. If the car is cranking but will not start with the air filter removed, have an assistant spray a small amount of starting fluid in the air intake and immediately try to start the car. If if fires but immediately sputters and dies, this is a sign that your fuel pump is not delivering enough fuel to keep the engine running and will require maintenance.

How to Diagnose a Bad Electronic Ignition

When you turn the key in the ignition, you expect your vehicle to fire up on the first try. Eventually, most everyone will experience a "dead" vehicle at some point. You get into the car, turn the ignition key, and absolutely nothing happens. This means there is something wrong with the battery, ignition, starter motor or starter solenoid. A few quick troubleshooting steps can help you diagnose a bad electronic ignition.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle in a dark area so that you can monitor the headlights.

    2

    Turn on the vehicle's headlights and attempt to start the vehicle with the ignition key.

    3

    Watch the headlights. If the headlights dim when you turn the ignition key, this means that the ignition is sending power to the starter motor and starter solenoid. This means the ignition system works properly, and the issue is likely with the starter or solenoid. If the lights do not dim, the ignition is defective.

How to Find Vacuum Problems on a 1999 Blazer 4.3L

An internal combustion engine creates a natural vacuum when the fuel/air mixture is ignited. Automakers put this vacuum to good use by making it power different valves and solenoids. On occasion, the rubber and plastic vacuum lines or vacuum-powered component can crack or break, creating a leak. A leaking vacuum system on your 1999 Blazer can cause minor running issues or may even cause the SUV not to run at all. Since vacuum leaks are sometimes tough to find, a smoke machine is used to find the leak.

Instructions

    1

    Open the Blazer's hood and locate the brake booster (the brake master cylinder is bolted to this component). Grip the hose clamp on the rubber vacuum hose connecting to the top of the booster with pliers and pull it about 3 inches down the hose. Pull the vacuum hose from the booster.

    2

    Insert the tapered fitting on the end of the smoke machine's hose into the vacuum hose.

    3

    Open the smoke machine's lid and pour in the UV dyed smoke liquid. Refer to the smoke machine's instructions for the exact amount of fluid, as this varies between models.

    4

    Plug in the smoke machine and turn it on. Wait for the Blazer's vacuum system to fill with smoke. Refer to the smoke machine's documentation for the exact time to wait.

    5

    Put on the UV glasses and use the UV light to inspect the entire engine. Any dye leaking from a vacuum line or vacuum-powered component indicates a leak. The dyed smoke has a florescent yellow tint when the UV light shines on it.

    6

    Repair any leaks found and continue checking for other leaks.

Rabu, 17 April 2013

What Causes the Engine Light to Turn on for a 2000 Acura Rl?

Any passenger vehicle or light truck sold in the U. S. since 1996 must have an on-board diagnostic (OBD) computer to monitor sensors throughout the engine, particularly the emissions-control system. When a system is not functioning correctly, this computer turns on the "Check Engine" light on the dashboard.

History

    Although on-board diagnostic monitoring began in the 1980s, the Clean Air Act of 1990 requires that all 1995 or newer vehicles have an OBD system that uses standard codes. These codes are known as OBD-II (on-board diagnostic, generation 2) codes. A code coming from an OBD-II computer can be read with a hand-held scanner.

Codes

    An OBD-II compliant diagnostic computer continually monitors sensors throughout the engine and other vehicle systems. When a sensor returns a "bad" reading, the OBD computer stores a code in its memory and lights the Check Engine warning on the dashboard. On any 2000 vehicle, this code can be read with a scanner. Codes range from trivial (a loose gas filler cap) to warnings of conditions that can cause major engine damage.

Causes

    The Check Engine light is a warning that your Acura should be serviced as soon as possible to diagnose the problem. Without a scanner reading, it is impossible to determine what problem caused the light to come on, nor can you determine the problem's severity. Consult your owner's manual for specific instructions.

How to Troubleshoot No Spark in a Boat

Boat ignition systems work in the same basic way as car ignition system, primarily since most boat engines derive their designs from a land-borne predecessor. While ignition systems might seem a bit baffling to the uninitiated, diagnosing an electrical problem is really no different than finding a kink in your garden hose. Just start at the point of use and work your way backward to the source; you'll find the kink somewhere in between.

Instructions

    1

    Disconnect one of the plug wires and plug it into a new and correctly gapped plug. Hold that plug to a solid ground on the engine -- preferably the cylinder head -- and attempt to start the engine. The spark should be thin, white and jump the gap with an audible pop. If it's wide and yellow, then your ignition system output is low. If it's nonexistent, then you've got other problems. Hold the spark plug to your negative battery terminal; if the spark quality suddenly improves, then you've got a bad engine ground.

    2

    Check to make sure that the distributor, distributor cap and all of the wiring harnesses are tight. Mark the distributor cap position with a marker, then remove it and check it for hairline cracks. Examine the contacts inside and look for melted or corroded tips. Check the rotor for excess play; twist it back and forth until the advance springs max out. If the rotor seems to have excess play in it, then you may have worn distributor gears or worn shaft bushings. Either one will lead to spark scatter and misfire.

    3

    Use a digital multimeter to check for power to the ignition module and to the coil. If you've got power and a solid ground to both, then proceed with the coil test procedure. There is a method to test ignition modules, but it varies by manufacturer; testing the coil is easier and will give you the same answer by process of elimination.

    4

    Pull the coil out (if you have a coil-on-plug or coil-in-cap ignition) or remove the plug wire from the top of the coil. Unplug the wiring harness from your coil or remove the wire leads from the studs. Set your DMM to read in ohms of resistance and touch the DMM's positive probe to the coil's positive power terminal. Touch the negative end to the negative power terminal; you should get a reading of between 0.40 and 1.00 ohms. Touching the negative probe to the coil's main output should give you a reading of between 7,500 and 15,000 ohms, depending upon the size of the coil. Anything outside this range indicates a bad coil.

Selasa, 16 April 2013

Spark Plug Problems on My 2002 Ford Escape

Spark Plug Problems on My 2002 Ford Escape

Proper auto maintenance keeps your vehicle in good running order for the long haul. Spark plugs are a central component of automotive function, and problems with the plugs can adversely affect engine performance and reduce fuel economy. While a professional mechanic can service your vehicle, save money and pick up some auto repair know-how by servicing the plugs on your Ford Escape yourself. The process is relatively straightforward and requires only a few tools.

Instructions

    1

    Turn off the vehicle and disconnect the battery. Open the hood and locate the spark plugs alongside the engine.

    2

    Open the upper intake manifold and remove the cable bracket. Tie the cables out of the way.

    3

    Disconnect the throttle position sensor and the idle air control connectors. Separate the vent hose from the bracket under the throttle body.

    4

    Use a spark plug boot puller to remove the plug. Pull on the boot and not the wire; otherwise, you could damage it.

    5

    Examine the spark plugs for signs of damage or engine problems. Look for cracks or tears, wear and tear in the electrode, or excessive oil buildup. Also examine the color: A spark plug should be gray or light tan. If it is dark brown or black, it must be replaced, and it may indicate the presence engine performance issues.

    6

    Put a small amount of anti-seize on the threads. Install the new set of spark plugs. Adjust the torque to 11 foot-pounds.

    7

    Replace the cable bracket and cables you removed earlier. Secure the upper intake manifold.

Senin, 15 April 2013

Symptoms of Worn Struts

Symptoms of Worn Struts

Struts may seem like very complex components, but they're actually easy to diagnose if you know what you're looking for. Struts are combination components, equal parts of spring, shock absorber and upper control arm. This multipurpose capability means that struts can exhibit at least three different types of failure. The trick is to break the strut down into its individual components and diagnose it from there.

Spring Failure

    Just as a paperclip will get hot when you bend it back and forth, the spring gets hotter when it cycles up and down. Because spring material receives its springiness via heat-treating -- repeated heat cycling can cause it to get springier and softer. Sagging is one sign of a soft spring, but pushing down on the fender will tell you more. To test the springs, slowly push down on one corner of the car with three fingers; if you can move it more than a couple of inches -- then odds are that the springs are shot.

Shock Failure

    Shock absorbers work like medical syringes, slowing suspension movement by forcing oil through a number of small holes between the shock's two fluid chambers. Over time, the shock oil will break down and get thinner, allowing it to pass through the holes easier and reduce the chock's dampening effect. Without shock absorbers, the wheels and car body would just pogo up and down on the springs until they run out of energy. To test the shock, place both hands on the car's fender and give it a sharp downward shove. The car should bounce upward until the spring extends and then settle down again. If the car continues to bounce past one cycle, the shocks are probably bad.

Mechanical Failures and Leaks

    Struts can also fail in a number of mechanical ways, from loose bolts to bent brackets to worn out clips and rubber stops. Aside from a visual inspection, the mechanical failure's primary symptoms are squeaks, rattles, bumps and groans while cornering or going over bumps. If, when traversing a large pothole, your car suddenly slams down like the springs were made of concrete, then odds are the strut's rubber bump-stop has degraded and hardened. If you diagnose a bad strut, then clean the struts with a pressure washer and check the shock body for leaking oil.

Driving Diagnosis

    Shocks and springs exhibit two different but related symptoms while driving. Bad springs will not resist vehicle movement as well as they should, which will allow the car's body to lean more than it should when cornering. Bad shock absorbers will allow the car's body to lean quicker than it should, and to rock back and forth after exiting a hard corner. Both bad shocks and springs will allow the car to nose-dive more under braking, to lose traction under acceleration and turning and to make the ride excessively soft and compliant. If you hit a speed bump at 30 mph and don't spill your latte, then its definitely time to invest in a new set of struts.

How to Check the Electric Fuel Pump on a 1995 Ford Truck

All Ford trucks manufactured in 1995 were equipped with an electric fuel pump that sits inside the gas tank of the vehicle. The fuel pump sends gas stored in the fuel tank through the fuel lines of the truck and on to the engine to allow the engine to run. Because the fuel pump is located in an inconvenient location it is important to first troubleshoot the pump to ensure that it really needs to be replaced instead of another part of the fuel system.

Instructions

    1

    Attach the fuel pressure gauge to the engine's Schrader valve and determine the current fuel pressure level of the truck. The Schrader valve resembles the air valve on a bicycle or car tire and normally sits near the top of the engine block. Start the engine and let it idle. Check the fuel pressure gauge and determine what the current fuel pressure is inside the fuel system of the truck. If you are not sure what the proper fuel pressure level should be, consult with a qualified mechanic or your local Ford dealership.

    2

    Check the fuel pressure regulator and make sure it isn't faulty and causing the low fuel pressure inside your truck's fuel system. Reattach the fuel pressure gauge if you detached it after following Step 1, and restart the engine. While the engine is idling, lightly squeeze the fuel line connected to the fuel pressure regulator with pliers and check if the fuel pressure goes up. If the fuel pressure does go up the regulator is faulty and should be repaired or replaced.

    3

    Determine whether or not the fuel pump begins to function as soon as the truck's battery is on. After inserting the key in the ignition, turn it so that the battery energized but the engine is running. When the fuel pump is functioning correctly, gas will be pulled from the fuel tank and sent through the fuel lines when the battery is energized, even if the engine is not turned on. Listen for the fuel pump while you sit in your car or, if you can't determine whether you hear the pump running, have a helper listen outside of the car near the gas tank.

    4

    Check if the vehicle shows any symptoms of a failed fuel pump. Two major symptoms include the truck stalling when you press down on the gas pedal and the engine refusing to start.

Minggu, 14 April 2013

How to Troubleshoot Fuel Problems From Possible Vandalism

How to Troubleshoot Fuel Problems From Possible Vandalism

Despite all of the modern securities built into your vehicle, little protection is in place to keep your gas tank clean and tamper-free. If you are starting to suspect that something may be wrong, here is a list of substances that could have been added to your tank, each with their own set of symptoms.

Instructions

    1

    Check your gas tank for water if you start noticing hesitation, sputtering, engine knocking, loss of power, uneven throttle and sometimes excessive "white" exhaust. Water dilutes and weakens the combustibility of the gasoline. If you suspect you have water in your tank, add a prescribed amount of DryGas or another fuel additive that works by adding combustible octane to the gasoline. You could also have the tank drained or siphoned.

    2

    Investigate to see if there is sugar or salt in your gas tank if your vehicle begins sputtering, hesitating, or if you experience a loss of power or uneven throttle. Sugar or salt remains suspended in the fuel and can make its way throughout the fuel delivery system, clogging up the filters and fuel injectors. Major repairs are needed to restore a vehicle to a safe and working condition. Mechanics will have to take apart the entire fuel delivery system and either clean, repair or replace the parts.

    3

    Search for bleach in your gas tank if you notice that your fuel lines and gas tank have prematurely begun to rust and if your vehicle has started stalling. Of course, if you smell bleach around your car, this is another sign. If caught before turning on the vehicle, one could simply clean out the tank. If not, the entire fuel system will have to be replaced. The best thing to do is flush out the gas tank and fuel lines and replace the fuel filter.

    4

    Seek the help of a professional if you suspect sand has been added to your gas tank since it will be difficult to determine on your own. Unlike salt or sugar, sand settles at the bottom of the tank. Unless a large amount of sand was dumped into the tank (which could block the fuel intake pump), little damage will occur.

Sabtu, 13 April 2013

99 Jetta Stalls at Cold Start

Equipped with a 2.0-liter engine and a manual transmission your base model 1999 Volkswagen Jetta has become known as a reliable and trustworthy vehicle. It means a great deal in terms of reliability to be able to jump in your car and go at any given time if needed, so a stalling problem anytime the engine is cold is a serious issue. There are many different things that can cause your Jetta to stall immediately on start up, but finding the needle in the haystack wont be so difficult if you know the right places to look.

Air and Fuel

    When you initially start your engine your PCM detects the engine is cold and provides a rich fuel mixture. This fuel mixture is required because gasoline at a cooler temperature doesnt vaporize as quickly and warm gasoline. Once the engine warms up, the fuel vaporizes much quicker in the combustion chamber so the PCM can return the air to fuel mixture back to its optimum level. When cold stalling is a problem you should first check all of your vacuum lines and the gaskets around the throttle body and intake manifold. If there is extra unmetered air entering the combustion chamber the fuel mixture may be to lean to maintain proper combustion in a cool engine. If your Jetta runs great after its warmed up, this is likely your cause. A partially blocked fuel line or filter, along with clogged injectors can also lead to stalling upon startup due to the lack of fuel.

Sensors

    The throttle control module and the intake air temperature sensor could lead to a cold stalling situation. If the air intake temperature sensor reports a false value the PCM may supply to lean of a fuel mixture. If the throttle control module is faulty it may be allowing too much air into the engine when its cold. Your throttle control module is your throttle body, where the throttle cables attach and the air temperature sensor is located on the side of the upper intake manifold. The coolant temperature sensor relays the temperature of the coolant to the PCM. IF the coolant temp sensor is reporting the engine is warm all the time, the PCM will provide too lean of a mixture and cause the engine to stall when cold. The coolant temperature sensor is located on the coolant flange connected to the cylinder head.

Internal Engine Problems

    If your Jetta has a lot of miles, you may be victim of a worn engine. As the engine provides a long life of service, eventually friction will wear down parts like piston rings and valve seals. If your piston rings are worn and compression is low in one or more of your cylinders, the engine may not be able to sustain a cold idle. Performing a quick compression check on each cylinder will confirm if this is your problem. At new your engine should have between 145 and 189 PSI per cylinder. The engine is considered worn and in need of a rebuild if compression is less than 109 PSI or if there is a difference of more than 44 PSI between cylinders. If your valve seals are worn, they will not properly seal when closed and will allow extra air into the combustion chamber. This can also lead to low compression numbers and cold stalling.

Additional Thoughts

    Listed above are the most common problems related to a cold stalling scenario. There are still many other reasons for a cold stall, like worn or fouled out spark plugs. Aside from spark plugs, any part of the ignition system working incorrectly can affect your combustion at idle or under load. Even gasoline that has been contaminated with water can cause your engine to stall on start up and run sluggish while driving. Adding water to the combustion process causes and incomplete burn and causes the engine to run exceptionally lean. If you are a victim of bad gas you can either drain it and fill with fresh gas, or deal with it until your next fill up. You can always try using some variation of dry gas to see if that will help ease the cold stalling problem.

How to Check Clutch Problems

How to Check Clutch Problems

Clutch problems can have various causes, and you can check most of them yourself in order to diagnose the issue. If the problem is severe, like the clutch cannot engage the transmission to be in gear, then you need to ask for professional mechanic help. Checking for clutch problems yourself is important, as readjustment of the clutch is fairly easy, while getting it replaced by a mechanic is quite pricey if you don't know for sure as to what's wrong with the clutch.

Instructions

Slippage

    1

    Set the emergency brake, start the engine, and rev it up.

    2

    Place the transmission in a high gear.

    3

    Slowly release the clutch pad, and try to drive the vehicle in the forward direction maintaining very little speed.

    4

    Observe whether the engine is still running slowly as you release the clutch pedal.

    5

    Observe whether the engine is killed immediately or if it is running momentarily before the clutch makes it stall. If the engine is running momentarily before it dies, there must be a partial clutch slippage problem, but if it is running slowly, then there is a definite problem of slipping with the clutch.

Abnormal Noises

    6

    Turn the engine off, and listen for abnormal squeaking, scraping or clunking sound when the clutch pedal is moved up or down. These sounds indicate a worn out clutch release mechanism that might be in need of lubrication.

    7

    Engage the clutch, and listen for sounds like knocking and rattling. These indicate friction problems with the disc that might have worn out.

    8

    Disengage the clutch, and listen for abnormal sounds from the engine. This could indicate a problem with the clutch release bearing, which might need lubrication or binding.

    9

    Put the vehicle in neutral, and listen for abnormal sounds. These sounds might stop as soon as the clutch pedal is pushed and are caused by transmission problems.

Jumat, 12 April 2013

Ford Windstar Cranks Over but Won't Start

Ford Windstar Cranks Over but Won't Start

The Windstar was a minivan produced by Ford for the 1995 through 2003 model-years. The Windstar came equipped with a number of standard features, including a six-cylinder engine, dual airbags and anti-lock brakes.The Windstar was plagued by a number of mechanical issues, the most serious one being premature failure of the head gasket. Ford extended the warranty for this item to 100,000 miles on most Windstars. While a blown head gasket could be the cause of the vehicle's inability to start, there are some key areas of concern you should check to troubleshoot the problem.

Instructions

    1

    Check to make sure there is fuel in the vehicle. Even if the fuel gauge is not reading empty, you could be getting a faulty reading from the fuel gauge. If there is any question about how much fuel you actually have in the tank, add a gallon of fuel and try to start the vehicle again.

    2

    Change the fuel filter to be sure the engine is actually getting fuel. A clogged filter will restrict fuel flow and prevent the vehicle from starting.

    3

    Test the fuel pump to see if it has failed. Use a test gauge on the fuel system to check the fuel pressure in the system, which should be between 30 and 45 PSI while cranking the engine or idling. If the pressure is lower than this, the fuel pump is not operating properly and should be replaced.

    4

    Remove the spark plugs with a spark plug wrench and inspect the tips for excessive wear or carbon buildup. Spark plugs coated with thick, black carbon residue will not fire properly and can prevent the engine from running smoothly or prevent it from starting altogether. Replace the spark plugs if necessary and attempt to start the vehicle again.

    5

    Perform a compression test on one of the cylinders with a compression gauge once all the spark plugs have been removed. The cylinder should have a compression reading ranging from 125 to 160 PSI when the engine is cranked for five seconds. Loss of compression is a sign that the timing belt has failed and will need to be replaced.

Would an Oxygen Sensor Show a Faulty Converter on a Computer Test?

Beginning in 1976, the U.S. government required all on-road vehicles to have catalytic converters to convert the toxic gases created by the engines' internal combustion to less harmful ones. Newer, electronically controlled engines have sensors installed in the exhaust called oxygen sensors. One of the oxygen sensors measures the catalytic converter's ability to filter out harmful toxins before they enter the atmosphere. If the sensor reads a high concentration of toxins, the vehicle's computer will produce a catalytic converter failure code -- even if it's a false reading.

Upstream Oxygen Sensor

    The first oxygen sensor that the exhaust meets on its way to the tailpipe is the upstream oxygen sensor -- sometimes called a heated oxygen sensor, or an air-fuel monitor. This sensor is usually mounted in the exhaust manifold, or just in front of the catalytic converter. The sensor takes a reading of the exhaust as it comes out of the combustion chamber: First, it monitors the air and fuel mixture via the unburned fuel in the exhaust; then, it relays the gathered information to the vehicle's computer for analysis.

Downstream Oxygen Sensor

    The downstream oxygen sensor -- sometimes called a catalyst monitor -- mounts into the exhaust pipe, just after the catalytic converter. This sensor measures the amount of oxygen in the exhaust as it exits the catalytic converter; the sensor then relays this information to the computer, and the computer processes the downstream sensor's readings. If the computer finds an oxygen deficiency -- meaning the catalytic converter is not oxidizing the toxic gases correctly -- it produces a catalytic converter failure code and triggers the "Check Engine" light.

The Catalytic Converter's Function

    The catalytic converter performs three functions: First, it combines oxygen to the unburned fuel, turning it to carbon dioxide and water; then, it converts nitrogen oxide into nitrogen; lastly, it combines oxygen with the carbon monoxide created by the engine to turn it into carbon dioxide.

False Catalytic Converter Failure Codes

    If the upstream sensor fails, and as a result it begins to incorrectly read the air-fuel mixture, it can cause the computer to increase the amount of fuel sent to the combustion chamber. If the amount of fuel increases, then the catalytic converter may not be able to convert the unburned fuel into carbon dioxide. This may trigger a catalytic converter failure code, as the computer is still receiving a signal from the upstream sensor.

    The downstream sensor is the more likely of the oxygen sensors to trigger a false catalytic converter failure code. If this sensor does not properly read the amount of gases coming from the catalytic converter and sends this inaccurate reading to the vehicles' computer, the computer will then likely produce a catalytic converter failure code.

Functions Tests

    Due to the fact that a failed oxygen sensor can result in a catalytic converter failure code, it is important to diagnose the code correctly. Any single malfunction code found on a computer scan does not mean that component has failed. You must perform function tests using a diagnostic scanner in order to diagnose the problem correctly. Function tests involve looking at waveforms and analyzing the oxygen sensors' readings. Such a test includes inserting a monitor in the vehicle's tailpipe, so that the diagnostic scanner gets a direct reading of the exhaust. The reading is then compared to the one taken by the oxygen sensor. If they differ drastically, you need to replace the sensor and not the catalytic converter.

Symptoms of a Wrong Firing Order

Symptoms of a Wrong Firing Order

There are several steps in the firing of a cylinder in an internal combustion engine. With a piston starting at the top, the crankshaft pulls the piston down, opening the chamber for a mixture of fuel and air to be injected. The piston is then pushed back up the cylinder, compressing the fuel/air mixture into a very tight space. A spark plug ignites the compressed fuel/air mixture, driving the piston down and turning the crankshaft. In multi-cylinder engines this process repeats itself multiple times, delivering power to the crankshaft.

Troubleshooting Firing Order

    A critical component of a functioning engine is the firing order of the cylinders. When the firing order is wrong or delayed, the engine does not run properly. The spark may be delivered to the cylinder when there is no fuel/air mixture or before it is properly compressed. One symptom of an incorrect firing order is the engine does not run. Turning the ignition does not start the engine.

Causes of Wrong Firing Orders

    Every engine manufacturer provides a service manual detailing the correct firing order of their cylinders. Firing order begins with a spark plug wire leading from the number one cylinder to the number one position on the the distributor and the remaining spark plug cables connected to their respective cylinders. When one or more spark plug wires are crossed, the engine may not run, or runs roughly as the timing of fuel/air compression does not align with the delivery of the spark.

Correcting Firing Order

    Locate the number one terminal on the distributor and ensure that its spark plug wire runs to the number one cylinder. Ensure that the number two spark plug wire goes to the number two cylinder and so on. The vehicle's service manual will indicate where the number one terminal on the distributor is and which cylinder is number one. Check for shorts, cracks and frays in the wires themselves to ensure that a short is not causing the wrong firing order.

Timing problems

    While engine timing problems are not directly related to incorrect firing order, they cause similar symptoms. Failure to start, rough idling and backfires can all result from incorrect timing, assuming that the firing order is correct. A timing light aimed at the engine timing scale on the front of the engine helps determine if overly advanced or retarded timing is preventing the engine from firing at the correct time.

How to Know If a Wheel Hub Is Going Bad?

The hub of a car wheel is the point where the tire and rim is mounted and attached to the steering mechanism. If the hub degrades and starts going bad, your car's performance will start to suffer. There are a few simple checks that you can perform on your wheel hub to see whether it is going bad or not. You won't need any special tools or training to run through the tests, so you can do them almost anywhere or any time.

Instructions

    1

    Grip the wheel firmly at the very top and very bottom positions and try to shake the wheel. If the wheel moves and doesn't resist very much your hub may be bad.

    2

    Spin the wheel by hand without use of the engine. When you spin it you may feel friction and hear scraping. These are signs of a bad hub.

    3

    Check the hub after it has been used for 10 miles of driving. If the hub feels hot to the touch it may be bad. A good hub will feel only slightly warm while the wheel itself gets hot.

    4

    Drive on the wheel and pay attention to the behavior of the wheel. If you feel pulling during braking or lack of response when steering, the hub is not performing its job.

Rabu, 10 April 2013

How to Diagnose a Purge Valve

How to Diagnose a Purge Valve

As part of your vehicle's emission-control system, the purge valve controls fuel vapors collected inside a canister. The fuel tank produces these vapors, which the canister stores for burning whenever the engine is at operating temperature and running above idle speed. The purge valve, controlled by your car's computer, keeps emissions down and avoids rough idle. However, purge valves may become stuck. Diagnose the purge valve in minutes and help your engine maintain optimal performance. This guide applies to purge valves used on fuel-injected systems.

Instructions

    1

    Locate the purge valve in your vehicle. Typically, this is a small cylinder on the left (driver's) side of the engine compartment. The valve has an electrical connection at the bottom and an input-output vacuum hose port. One side of the port connects to a vacuum hose that goes to the purge canister hiding on the front and bottom of the engine compartment. The other side of the port connects to the fuel tank and the intake manifold with a vacuum hose through a dual plastic connector.

    2

    Disconnect the black (negative) battery cable with a wrench and isolate the cable terminal with a shop rag to prevent the cable from accidentally touching the battery post.

    3

    Inspect the vacuum hoses connected to the purge valve and check for damage, tears or loose connections. A vacuum leak can cause the purge valve to fail. Reconnect any loose hoses and replace damaged ones, if necessary.

    4

    Label the vacuum hoses connected to the purge valve and the ports they connect to on the purge valve and carefully disconnect the hoses.

    5

    Unplug the electrical connector from the purge valve.

    6

    Apply 5 inches of mercury with a hand vacuum pump to the source port on the valve, which connects to the intake manifold. The valve should hold the vacuum. If the valve allows air to pass through the source port, replace it.

    7

    Hold the 5 inches of mercury to the source port with the hand vacuum pump. Connect a jumper cable from the negative post on the battery to the black wire on the purge valve electrical connector and another jumper cable from the positive battery post to the other wire on the purge valve electrical connector. This time, the valve should let air go through the source port. If not, replace it.

How to Troubleshoot a 1996 Chevy Lumina

How to Troubleshoot a 1996 Chevy Lumina

The 1996 Chevrolet Lumina was a four-door passenger car with a 3.1-liter V-6 engine. The car was manufactured with an automatic transmission and seating for five passengers. It has very few complaints on record, with the majority of the common problems being related to the engine and cooling system. The 1996 Lumina was a top seller for Chevy as an affordable option with a powerful engine and reasonable fuel economy.

Instructions

    1

    Place the key in the ignition and start the car. If the Lumina makes a clicking sound and fails to start, it indicates a bad starter. Open the hood and locate the starter's cylinder on the passenger side of the engine. Tap the starter with a hammer and attempt to start. If the process fails, have the starter tested by an auto shop.

    2

    Test the power system if the vehicle engine fails to start and does not make any sounds. Attach a voltage meter to the battery and look for a reading of 12 volts to indicate the battery is charged. If the voltage reading is lower than 12 volts, attach the battery to a trickle charger and start the car when it is fully charged.

    3

    Drive the car and pay attention to the power as you increase the amount of gas. If the car surges and sputters, replace the fuel pump. A bad pump will cause inconsistent power and eventually the engine will die from a lack of fuel.

    4

    Check the gaskets and fluid levels if the engine overheats. The 1996 Lumina had issues with coolant leaks and gasket failures. Refill the coolant until you can locate and plug the leak. Also inspect the gaskets for ruptures and replace any that are damaged.

    5

    Flush the transmission and replace the fluids if the car has difficulty shifting gears. The problem was reported in a limited number of Luminas and the flush has the potential to correct the issue. If it the problem continues, the transmission must be inspected by a professional.

Selasa, 09 April 2013

How to Check the Engine of a 2002 Manual Miata

If a 2002 Mazda Miata's check engine light has illuminated, it frequently indicates a malfunction within the engine itself. The challenge lies in deciphering whether the car will need a costly repair, or whether the problem is a relatively simple one. Fortunately, if it was sold in the United States, the 2002 Miata has to conform to the Environmental Protection Agency's rules for standardized On-Board Diagnostic systems. This means that the car's computer will provide universal trouble codes you can use to diagnose the engine. An OBD-II scanner is the only means by which the codes can be retrieved.

Instructions

    1

    Uncover the 2002 Mazda Miata's Data Link Connector. This outlet is on the left hand side of the driver's dashboard. It is concealed behind the panel covering the Miata's fuse box.

    2

    Plug your OBD-II scanner into Miata's Data Link Connector. This diagnostic port serves as an entry point into the computer. Your scanner will feature a cable with a 16 pin plug that will easily fit into the DLC.

    3

    Activate your scanner by turning it on. You may not need to do this, depending on the type of OBD-II scanner you own. Some brands are preset to auto-start once they sense a connection with an On-Board Diagnostic system.

    4

    Stick your key into the Miata's ignition and turn to "On." This will turn on the electrical system and the diagnostic computer. Some scanners, however, also need the engine running too. If you own this typ of scanner, start the 2002 Miata's engine.

    5

    Enter a "read" command into your scanner, if you own one that is not preset to auto-retrieve trouble codes. The design of scanners differs by brand, and so you will need to consult your scanner's user manual for the exact retrieval process.

    6

    Consult the appendices in your scanner's user manual. Most scanners have lists of OBD-II codes there. You may also need to find Mazda's unique OBD-II supplemental codes on the internet (See Resources). Look up each of the trouble codes listed on the scanner's read-out screen. These code descriptions will help you decide whether you can attempt repairs yourself or if you should take the Miata to a Mazda certified mechanic.

Honda Distributor Oil Leak

The distributor on your Honda might seem to be functioning properly, but it still could be leaking oil just out of sight. For your distributor to function properly, it needs oil to act as a lubricant. Unfortunately, a leaky distributor can cause problems for the rest of your car.

Leak

    Your Honda's distributor has two seals. These seals are prone to wear and will erode over time, allowing oil to leak out of the distributor.

Location

    The distributor is housed directly over an antifreeze supply tube. Oil from the distributor can leak down and rupture that tube, causing antifreeze to drain out of your car.

Damage

    The resultant draining antifreeze can spill onto your Honda's transmission, causing it to malfunction. Repairing a transmission can cost in excess of $1000.

Senin, 08 April 2013

Signs of Oil Pump Failure

Signs of Oil Pump Failure

Oil pump failure can be a costly problem. A problem with a car's oil pump can lead to a loss of engine lubrication and cause various other engine components to malfunction or break. It is important to be aware of the signs of oil pump failure so you can take preventative measures and make timely repairs before the vehicle's engine is permanently damaged.

Low Oil Pressure

    Your engine will probably show low oil pressure on its oil pressure gauge if your oil pump is failing or completely stops working. Low oil pressure means that there may not be enough oil running through your engine to maintain proper lubrication.

Noises

    When an engine goes without proper lubrication, it will start making tapping or knocking noises as the lifters and piston rods hit metal while the engine runs. A whining noise from the oil pump itself may also be a sign of impending pump failure. Even if your engine oil shows full on the dipstick, you may still have a bad oil pump that is not allowing the oil to circulate, so you should take seriously any noises you hear coming from your engine or oil pump.

Increased Engine Temperature

    When an engine runs without proper lubrication, friction increases and heat builds within the engine. This heat will cause the overall running engine temperature to rise and the engine to possibly overheat. A overheated engine can cause a variety of problems for a vehicle because there are a number of different parts that fail or warp when exposed to very high temperatures.